Potentially Devastating Melting Arctic Sea Ice Causing Deadly Phocine Distemper Virus (PDV) To Spread In Marine Mammals!

Climate change could be to blame for spikes in a deadly virus among otters, seals and sea lions around the Arctic, a new study has suggested.

Phocine distemper virus (PDV) has been common in the northern Atlantic ocean for decades but as a result of melting Arctic sea ice it has now appeared among marine mammals in the northern Pacific ocean too.

When the virus started to spread across species of Otters, Seals and Sea Lions in the northern Pacific Oceans, scientists thought melting ice could be the culprit. 

The 15-year study which tracked the animals via satellite found PDV, which can kill some species, was most common in years when so much Arctic ice melted it became possible for mammals to move freely from the Atlantic to Pacific regions.

a dog swimming in a body of water
Sea Otters

Steadily rising global temperatures due to climate change have meant more and more sea ice is melting around the Arctic, opening up sea lanes which for thousands of years have been impassable.

Between 1979 and 2018, Arctic sea ice declined on average 12.8 per cent each decade, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

“These sea ice changes in September are likely unprecedented for at least 1,000 years,” the IPCC said in a report published in September.

Researchers studied 15 years of data that tracked 2,500 marine mammals in a variety of locations via satellite to find if upticks in PDV matched with declines in sea ice. They also studied measurements of Arctic sea ice over the same time period and examined blood and nasal swab samples from 165 dead ice-associated animals. 

Testing showed about 30 per cent of Stellar Sea Lions in the northern Pacific Ocean were infected with the disease, which had previously been mostly confined to Atlantic populations.

Steller sea lions swim through waters off the coast of British Columbia. Scientists are concerned that a deadly virus killing northern sea lions could spread farther south as the ice melts, infecting marine mammals off the coast of California.
Steller Sea Lions swim through waters off the coast of British Columbia. Scientists are concerned that a deadly virus killing Northern Sea Lions could spread farther south as the ice melts, infecting marine mammals off the coast of California.

Researchers concluded that melting Arctic sea ice caused by human-driven climate change paved the way for PDV to spread to new regions and infect new populations of marine mammals, especially along the northern Russian coast and along the coast of northern Canada. 

Please SHARE to raise awareness to this issue. You can also SUBSCRIBE to receive news and updates straight to your inbox.

Image result for climate change is real

The Best Dog Breeds For Mental Health Support

It’s been proven by science — dogs are good for your health.

The beneficial affects of dogs on people with depression has been well documented, and is it really any surprise?

Those furry, four-legged, tail-wagging dogs bring tons of joy into our lives, and for those coping with depression, the unconditional love of a dog can have tremendous power.

Dogs can help with anxiety, depression, PTSD, and many other mental health issues that affect your day-to-day life. Some dogs even provide emotional support as a full-time gig, working as service animals that are placed in schools, hospitals, nursing homes, and other locations.

While the advantages of dog ownership are huge, it’s worth asking – what are the best dogs for depression? You’ll want to find the right dog for you.

Picking the wrong dog for your lifestyle can increase stress and anxiety, so finding a dog that’s a good fit is essential for reaping the mood-boosting benefits of canine ownership.

In separate studies conducted by the “Journal of Psychiatric Research” and the “Journal of Applied Developmental Science,” researchers found that owning a dog not only made people suffering from mental health issues feel better, but it also made them more likely to help others. Additional research has shown that dog ownership also lowers blood pressure, elevates serotonin and dopamine in the brain, and even lowers triglycerides and cholesterol.

If you’re already a dog owner, some of these things may already be a given. You know what it means to have a dog and how it’s impacted your life. But if you’re still on the fence about dog ownership and are also experiencing mental health issues, dogs offer companionship and comfort, and can help ease loneliness, depression and anxiety. Check out or list of the best purebred and hybrid dog breeds to choose from if you need a loving best friend to brighten your day.

It’s also worth noting that you by no means need to get a purebred dog – make sure to consider adopting a rescue dog from a shelter.

These dogs tend to have boundless love to give, and are often especially appreciative of finding their new forever home. Mixed breed dogs, often found in shelters, can have the best of multiple breeds, so make sure to consider them for your canine companion!

The Best Dogs For Depression: Canines That Can Cure the Blues

The Cavalier King Charles spaniel is loving and gentle.
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

The Cavalier King Charles spaniel is on practically everyone’s list as a great support dog because of its rep as a “cuddlebug.” These super affectionate pups are true companion dogs and are quick to learn and eager to please.

Loving and gentle, the King Charles was a top dog in royal circles back in the day, but they don’t have the attitude of a monarch; they’re happy just to be in your presence, whether you’re on a long walk or snuggling on a couch. They are excellent companions for those with depression or PTSD.

Pugs have a certain grin that will make anyone smile.
Pug

The “clowns” of the dog world, pugs delight nearly everyone they come across with their human-like facial expressions and friendly, fun demeanor. Pugs are extremely sociable and make great emotional support animals for almost any affliction.

These small, charming companions are well mannered, even tempered and do especially well with children.

The standard poodle is obedient and clever.
Standard Poodle

These medium-sized, regal dogs are not just for show — they’re smart, obedient, easy to train and are valued as a wonderful mental health companion. Standard poodles are working dogs that love a good challenge, physical activity and that thrive in any environment.

They are friendly and do well around humans and animal companions alike, but their top priority is their compassion and responsibility toward their owner.

Labrador retrievers bring much-needed energy to someone struggling with mental health.
Labrador Retriever

The labrador retriever is an energetic, sturdy companion dog who lives up to the name “retriever” as that’s what he was bred to do — find things, carry them and ultimately drop them at the feet of his cherished human.

The lab is smart and obedient with a calm demeanor, which makes for a top-notch emotional support animal for any mental health issue. Those with ADD or autism often feel more grounded and settled in the presence of a loving lab.

Yorkies make the perfect lap dogs.
Yorkshire Terrier

You’ll see many Yorkies as service or support animals and there are several reasons as to why that is. Yorkies are small enough that they fall under most rental policies and they can be taken anywhere dogs are welcome, which, as the Psychiatric Service Dog Society claims, is vital to specific mental health issues.

Yorkies also rise to the occasion for lap duty, providing caregivers the opportunity to physically embrace them when needed. These tiny wonderdogs can also be taught myriad tasks, from pulling open cabinet doors to alerting their owners to specific sounds.

Border collies make loyal and friendly companions.
Border Collie

Breeds don’t come much smarter than this! The border collie is a devoted, friendly companion that is easily trainable, affectionate and a people pleaser. A herding dog by nature, the border collie will motivate and inspire you to get moving even when you don’t feel like it. 

This trait makes them an excellent dog for those who deal with depression. Additionally, if you suffer from anxiety, this calm, content canine will provide plenty of grounding and physical comfort.

This breed also makes an excellent guide dog.
Corgi

While their height makes them unsuited for some service dog jobs, Corgis were also bred for herding and make wonderful guide dogs. They have a strong instinct for picking up on their owners’ emotions and helping them accordingly. These energetic working dogs are smart, curious, eager and easy to train.

Corgis are also known for being aware of their surroundings at all times, which makes them perfect for people who need constant emotional support.

The vizsla will get its owner outside to enjoy the fresh air.
Vizsla

The vizsla is a lesser-known breed in the U.S. but is gaining popularity as a companion pet and emotional support animal. Bred for hunting, these Hungarian pointers are joyful and people-focused. Vizslas have a ton of energy and do need outdoor exercise, so if you’re not a person that gets out much, this may not be the dog for you.

Vizslas are intelligent, quick learners that carry out any task put before them, and their cheerful disposition makes them an excellent choice of support dog. Like pugs, vizslas bond with nearly everyone and do well in a home with children.

English bulldogs are low key and calm.
English Bulldog

The English bulldog is delightful emotional support companion that is perfect for apartment living and also for those who don’t spend much time exercising or doing other outdoor activities. They are kind, affectionate dogs that are low key and offer a sense of calm to whoever they come in contact with.

If you’re interested in a brachycephalic (short-nosed) breed as a companion animal, it’s best if you don’t travel by plane much. Many of them, particularly bulldogs, have been banned from flying as they can have breathing issues due to the change in air pressure.

Related image
German Shephard

Germans shepherds have strong protective instincts, which can lead to aggression if they are not carefully trained. If you are interested in this breed, make sure you have the upper hand in your dynamic. Germans are smart, responsible and love a good challenge — all of which makes them highly trainable for a variety of jobs.

They are also herders by nature and tend to lead the way, which is good for someone who needs a little motivation. The breed’s size also lends itself to strength and physical support if needed.

Image result for golden retriever
Golden Retriever

Goldens are one of the most popular breeds around overall and are considered one of the best mental health support dogs out there. They are energetic, loving and comforting to those who need it, and are super social with other animals and people.

These intelligent, gentle giants are loyal companions that are easy to train and are willing to perform nearly any task put before them.

The Lhasa apso is small but very intuitive.
Lhasa Apso

This little dog has a warm disposition and is excellent for those suffering from with PTSD, depression or bipolar disorder. They, too, are “mood readers” and are known to “nudge” their owners toward the right course of action in certain situations.

Lhasa apsos are easily trainable, highly demonstrative and are perfect for individuals in need of uplifting companionship.

Image result for collie
Collie

If you remember the television show “Lassie,” you’ll remember the Collie that comes to the rescue of her family in every episode. Collies are known to make great support dogs for many mental health ailments, including PTSD, as they are highly intuitive to human feelings. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and gentle, all of which are great qualities for an emotional support animal or psychiatric therapy dog.

Collies are also very protective of their families and have a large bark to prove it. The very act of petting a dog lowers stress hormones, and the Collie, with its soft and fluffy fur, seems to have been created just for this purpose.

Rotties are often misunderstood, but they are quite friendly and patient.
Rottweiler

Known for its strength and guarding abilities, the rottie also makes for a great mental health support companion. A breed must have a good disposition and temperament, and be friendly, patient and at ease in all situations to be a psychiatric or emotional therapy dog. Rotties indeed fit this bill.

While some people believe rotties to be vicious, that is not the case at all. They are lovable cuddlers who are fiercely loyal to their owners. You can lean on a rottie for help, both figuratively and literally.

Image result for Chihuahua
Chihuahua

The Chihuahua proves you don’t have to be big to be a loving, responsible support animal. These small dogs win big in intelligence and loyalty and are highly alert to verbal and visual cues and commands.

Like most smaller dogs, Chihuahuas can live or travel anywhere, and for those who have 24/7 emotional support and mental health needs, a Chihuahua will never need to leave your side. This breed can also live to 15 years old or longer.

Image result for french bulldog
French Bulldog

Frenchies are cute, friendly clowns with happy dispositions who can tackle any mental health need from anxiety to depression, stress and emotional trauma. They are both a stress reliever and a shoulder to cry on for anyone needing a friend.

Frenchies are low maintenance, love people, are OK with being handled and have good manners. They are also especially loving toward kids. As with any brachycephalic breed, Frenchies don’t do well in hot weather — so be sure to keep them cool!

Related image
Dachshund

This low-to-the-ground pup is one of the most adorable emotional support animals out there, but don’t let the breed’s diminutive size fool you — it packs a punch in beating back the blues. Dachshunds are born hunters with a keen sense of smell and are emotionally intuitive. They are friendly, loyal and do exceptionally well with kids.

You can also prepare to have this loyal breed around for the long haul because they live, on average, about 15 years, sometimes even up to 20 years.

Related image
Borzoi

Borzois have such a keen intellect, independent streak and protection instinct — so much so that they are one of the chosen breeds of the non-profit Operation Wolfhound. The organization places dogs with vets suffering from PTSD.

Borzois can live to the ripe old age of 15, and are quiet, loyal and able to physically support a person if needed. They, like Irish wolfhounds, are gentle giants and enjoy spending time at their owner’s side. Remember, however, they need proper training and plenty of exercise to keep them well behaved and happy.

Image result for australian labradoodle
Australian Labradoodle

This mixed breed is a popular mental and physical therapy dog. It can answer to several different mental health needs, depending on the dog’s personality.

Australian labradoodles are specifically bred for companionship and guidance. They have an even keel temperament and are loving and highly intelligent. Australians can “pick up” on human emotions and can answer your needs accordingly. They’re happy, love to play and will bring a smile to just about any face.

Do you have an emotional support pet, official or unofficial? How does your dog help you through the day? Share your experience in the comments!

Please SHARE to raise awareness to mental health therapy dogs. You can also SUBSCRIBE to receive news and updates straight to your inbox.

Image result for dogs for mental health support

A Tragic Wolf Called ‘Romeo’ Loved Too Much, And He Deserved Better.

On a twilit night in Juneau, Alaska, in December 2003, and Nick and Sherrie Jans were walking with Dakotah, their yellow Lab, in the Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area not far from their house. Suddenly, a young black wolf appeared on the ice—and began running in their direction. Awestruck but scared, the couple watched as Dakotah broke loose and charged the predator, which was twice the size of the dog. The animals stopped yards apart and gazed at each other “as if each were glimpsing an almost-forgotten face and trying to remember,” recalled Jans. After a few moments, Dakotah ran back to her owners, and the three hurried home, listening to the wolf howl

The locals named him Romeo, and soon his presence was noted by the entire town. Most found it fascinating that Romeo was so friendly, while others assumed that this naturally predatory animal would give into his natural instincts at any moment, potentially attacking their pets and children.

During this time Nick Jans started documenting Romeo. When he did, he uncovered an emotional story, the heart of which describes the tenuous relationships between wild animals and the humans around them.

“The first thing I saw was tracks out on the lake in front of our house on the outskirts of Juneau,” Jans said in an interview with National Geographic. “A few days later, I looked out from my house and there was this wolf out on the ice. I’d had 20 years of experience around wolves up in the Arctic and immediately knew it was a wolf, not a dog. I threw on my skis and found him.”

lifebuzz-b0112ad59033e68b137766a1f4bd21fb-limit_2000
ROMEO

According to Jans, Romeo seemed totally relaxed and friendly.

lifebuzz-8a7a4b896aca36347a53911001df32a2-limit_2000

And it wasn’t just one interaction, either: Romeo remained his curious, friendly self for the better part of six years.

lifebuzz-79d7c399e4ca7f8254c59b3f38b9f361-limit_2000

“For want of a better word,” Jans said, “The only thing I can say from a human perspective is that it amounted to friendship. If you wanted to be scientifically correct, it would be “social mutual tolerance.” But it was more than that. The wolf would come trotting over to say hi, and give a little bow and a relaxed yawn, and go trotting after us when we went skiing. There was no survival benefit. He obviously just enjoyed our company.”

lifebuzz-4c37ad0be54e52a7f107014cc3a29aa7-limit_2000

Romeo’s behavior was definitely unusual, as many wolves tend to assert dominance by attacking dogs and other animals.

The wolf got his name because Jans and his family noticed how Romeo was kind of a flirt — particularly with their “Juliet,” a dog named Dakotah. Here, they’re standing nose-to-nose in what seems to be an all-too-perfect photo moment.

lifebuzz-58ac1a0bf3848e6b7025ad6bdb8fb768-limit_2000

Romeo survived for years despite many mortal threats: scented traps, busy roads, illegal hunting, and even a poisoning attempt. He also had to contend with the natural dangers of starvation, injury, and attack by another pack of wolves. By almost any standard, his prolonged proximity to humans and dogs constituted incredibly rare behaviour. There was no obvious survival benefit to his socializing, yet the wolf lingered persistently, a late echo of the original process that must have initiated the domestication of dogs.

lifebuzz-dff2dc99743c4309765d387d075f0a06-limit_2000

“When you get down to the genetic difference between a wolf and a domestic dog, whether it is a Chihuahua or a Great Dane, all dogs are 99.98 percent genetically a wolf. That 0.02 percent obviously looms huge, because if you raise a wolf cub from the time it opens its eyes, it may make a wonderfully bonded animal, but it will not be a dog, no matter what you do. It will act like a wolf and be a wolf. It takes generations to shape the soul of a wolf and its physical shape into man’s best friend.”

lifebuzz-d4d7d7759312ba2472282a6da9858fc5-limit_2000

Romeo stayed in the area for as long as he lived — and he lived three times longer than most wild wolves do.

05-a-wolf-called-romeo-close-up-fsl

“Romeo was the single most transformative event of my life,” Jans said. “The amazing thing was Romeo’s understanding. It wasn’t just our understanding and tolerance. It was the combination of his and ours and the dogs’. We were these three species working out how to get along harmoniously. And we did.”

lifebuzz-b37ac6ad0826d2d19bdd19a77ad10a23-limit_2000

What happened to Romeo?                                                                                                   Romeo disappeared in late September 2009. After some sleuthing, a supporter found he had been shot and killed by Juneau resident Park Myers III and his Pennsylvanian friend Jeff Peacock. Both men were arrested and ended up paying fines, serving a few years on probation, and losing hunting and fishing privileges for a limited time. In late November 2010, a memorial service was held for Romeo and this plaque was laid along a path where he once roamed.

02-a-wolf-called-romeo-plaque-fsl

“Nothing can take away the miracle that was Romeo and the years we spent in his company,” writes Jans. “Love, not hate, is the burden we carry.”

Nick Jans’ beautiful account of his unusual relationship is now in a book called A Wolf Called Romeo.

Please SHARE to let others read this beautiful but tragic story. You can also SUBSCRIBE to receive news and updates straight to your inbox.

Senate Unanimously Passes PACT Act, Which Will Make Animal Cruelty A Federal Felony!

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would make animal cruelty a federal felony. The Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act, or PACT Act, bans abusive behavior including crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating, impaling and other bodily injury toward any non-humans.

The bill was introduced by two Florida congressmen, Democrat Ted Deutch and Republican Vern Buchanan, in January. It was approved Tuesday by a voice vote.

Representatives Ted Deutch, left, and Vern Buchanan, sponsors of the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act (PACT), in Washington in July. The House unanimously approved the bill.

The PACT Act expands the Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act, which was passed by Congress in 2010 and made the creation and distribution of animal crushing videos illegal. However, the new act closes a loophole by prohibiting the underlying acts of animal abuse, according to the office of Congressman Deutch

“There’s no place in a civilized society for maiming and torturing animals – period,” said Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, who is a co-sponsor of the Senate bill. Current federal law prohibits animal fighting and only criminalizes animal cruelty if the wrongdoers create and sell videos depicting the act. Under the PACT Act, a person can be prosecuted for crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating and impaling animals and sexually exploiting them. Those convicted would face federal felony charges, fines and up to seven years in prison.”I’m glad Congress is finally sending the PACT Act to the President’s desk to be signed into law,” Blumenthal said.Right now, all 50 states have laws in their books against animal cruelty on the state level. If President Trump signs the bill, authorities can go after the wrongdoers because they will have federal jurisdiction and will not be bound by state laws. They can also prosecute criminals if the cruelty occurs on federal property.

The Humane Society Legislative Fund called Tuesday’s Senate vote a well-deserved victory. “We’ve made the case for this measure for many years, and view it as one of the largest victories for animals in a long time,” President and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States Kitty Block said. She went on “Over the course of 30 years in animal protection, I have encountered terrible animal cruelties, but acts of intentional torture are the most disturbing because they demonstrate how some people treat the most vulnerable in our society,” . “Reps. Ted Deutch (D-Fla) and Vern Buchanan (R-Fla) are tremendous advocates for animal protection, and we thank them for their leadership in closing this important gap in the law.”

The bill has been endorsed by the National Sheriffs Association and the Fraternal Order of Police.

What Trophy Hunting Does To The Elephants It Leaves Behind

Trophy Hunters Slaughter An Elephant In Zimbabwe

There was outrage when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the remains of Elephants legally hunted in Zimbabwe and Zambia could now be legally imported to the United States as trophies.

This new policy overturned a ban put in place by the Obama administration in 2014. African Elephants are considered “threatened” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a step below being endangered. The animals’ numbers have plunged from around 10 million 100 years ago to around 400,000 today, largely because of poaching and habitat loss. The Fish and Wildlife Service has not changed the Elephants’ status; instead, it now argues that supporting “legal, well-managed hunting programs” will help provide “much-needed conservation dollars to preserve habitats and protect wild herds” in Zimbabwe and Zambia, the agency’s principal deputy director, Greg Sheehan, said in a news release.

But then, to further complicate matters, President Donald Trump tweeted Friday evening that nothing would actually change until he “reviews all conservation facts.”

The idea that killing more elephants will help save the species is counterintuitive, and its line of reasoning is difficult for many conservation organizations to support: Let rich hunters pay hefty sums to shoot elephants, and use the money to help conservation efforts and local communities. Supposedly, the villagers won’t then need to poach elephants to feed their families and pay their kids’ school fees. Still, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, or IUCN, a respected organization that sets the conservation status for all species, supports the notion.

But the evidence that “hunting elephants saves them” is thin. The hunting-safari business employs few people, and the money from fees that trickles down to the villagers is insignificant. A 2009 report from the IUCN revealed that sport hunting in West Africa does not provide significant benefits to the surrounding communities. A more recent report by an Australian economic-analysis firm for Humane Society International found that trophy hunting amounts to less than 2 percent of tourism revenue in eight African countries that permit it.

And then, there is a larger moral question: How does hunting affect male elephants, especially the “big tuskers” that hunters want, and the overall population?

If elephants are recognized as legal persons, a term the U.S. courts have granted corporations, it would be more difficult to hunt them at all—let alone import their body parts. Wise’s lawsuit cites extensive scientific studies that have established elephants’ cognitive abilities, emotional and empathetic natures, complex social lives, lifelong learning, and memory skills. “Taken together, the research makes it clear elephants are autonomous beings who have the capacity to choose how to live their lives as elephants,” he tells me.

German Trophy Hunter Rainer Schoerr Proudly Poses With One Of The Biggest ‘Tuskers’ Ever Slaughtered In Zimbabe

One thing elephants would not choose, Wise and elephant researchers agree, is to be hunted. “It doesn’t matter to elephants if they are killed by poachers or trophy hunters,” says Joyce Poole, who has studied African elephants in the wild in Kenya and Mozambique for more than 40 years and is the codirector of ElephantVoices, a conservation organization. “Either way, you’re a killer. And if elephants understand that about you, they change their behavior.”

Elephants aren’t considered game animals in most African countries with substantial populations of these animals. But trophy hunters after large male elephants can seek their prey in South Africa, Namibia, Cameroon, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Gabon, and Mozambique. Kenya banned the sport in 1973, while Tanzania continued to permit legal hunting. That caused problems for the elephants of Kenya’s Amboseli National Park, says Poole, who was studying the large males in the park at the time. The park borders Tanzania, and after the Tanzanian government opened a hunting block on the opposite side, the Amboseli male elephants who wandered across became prized targets.

“It was an awful time,” Poole recalled, “because on one side, the elephants learned to trust tourists—generally white people—in cars. From our studies, we know they can smell the difference between whites and local people. They also distinguish us by our languages. They know people who speak Maa, the language of the local Maasai people, may throw spears at them; those who speak English don’t.” However, the tables were turned on the Tanzanian side of the border. There, white people in cars who drove up close to see an elephant might lean out with a camera—or a rifle.

“The elephants didn’t run because they didn’t expect to be shot,” Poole said. Two of the large males she was studying were lost this way to trophy hunters. She and others protested to the Tanzanian government, and these particular hunting blocks were eventually closed.

Poole does not know how the loss of these big males, who’d fathered many calves, affected the other elephants. Female elephants, though, do mourn family members who die, and are especially troubled when the matriarch, their leader, passes. In 2003, for instance, researchers in Kenya’s Samburu National Reserve watched as Eleanor, an elephant family’s matriarch, died from natural causes. When Eleanor fell heavily to the ground, Grace, a matriarch from another family, used her tusks to lift her friend and helped her to her feet. Despite Grace’s efforts, Eleanor died that night. She had a tiny, six-month-old calf who never left her side. In a photograph, the calf stands like a small sentinel beside her mother’s body, while the rest of the family bunches together, grieving.

Researchers have rarely seen similar moments among male elephants, who as adults, live away from the female herds they grew up in, and return only to mate. That behavior led to a “myth that males are far less social than females,” said George Wittemyer, a conservation biologist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins who has studied elephants in Kenya for more than 20 years. His new research contradicts this notion. “Actually, the males are always in groups and have preferences for certain companions. They’re not the loners they’ve been made out to be,” he said.

“The death of a bull will cause less disruption than the death of a family member,” said Iain Douglas-Hamilton, a zoologist who founded the organization Save the Elephants. “If a bull is shot while associating with a family the others will normally run away.” But he noted: “Bulls will defend or help each other sometimes, when one is down.”

From a population standpoint, “older male elephants are very important to the health and genetic vitality of a population,” said Cynthia Moss, who has led the Amboseli Elephant Research Project in Kenya since 1972. While hunters in the past have used the belief that older males are reproductively senile as an argument for killing them for their ivory, research has revealed that they are in fact an elephant population’s primary breeders. “By living to an older age, [older males show that] they have the traits for longevity and good health to pass on to their offspring,” Moss said. “Killing these males compromises the next generation of the population.”

It’s not clear if the Fish and Wildlife Service will consider how trophy hunting affects individual elephants or their families. The agency didn’t comment on Trump’s tweet when contacted, but later issued a public statement confirming that permits would be put on hold. “President Trump and I have talked and both believe that conservation and healthy herds are critical,” Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said in the statement.

Wise believes that the emotional and psychological suffering the elephants endure from this sport is obvious. “One day it will be seen for the moral outrage that it is,” he said.

A North Dakota Brewery Is Helping Shelter Dogs Get Adopted By Putting Their Faces On Their Beer Cans

Craft beer cans featuring the faces of shelter dogs from the Fargo Brewing Company.

A North Dakota brewery is helping local pups find their forever homes by featuring their faces on the front of its beer cans.

Partnering with the rescue organization 4 Luv of Dog Rescue, Fargo Brewing Company hopes that adding the dog’s mugs will help these harder-to-adopt pups get noticed. The dogs featured have a hard time socializing, so they don’t do well at adoption events. Hopefully, the cans will change that.

Jerad Ryan, a volunteer with 4 Luv of Dog, says the partnership between the brewery and the non-profit was his idea.

“Our wonder dogs are dogs that will live their best life in a home by themselves and there’s no other pets,” Ryan said. “They can be a little bit tougher to find homes for, foster homes, that type of thing. We are featuring those dogs in a can and bringing them here, so the public can meet them,” he added.

“The harder-to-adopt dogs sometimes labeled as ‘Oneder dogs’ have always had a special place in my heart,” shelter volunteer Jerad Ryan told the outlet. “My first three-and-a-half years volunteering at the shelter I would spend extra time with the dogs that had been there long-term mostly due to the fact they don’t do well living with any other dogs. Many of our foster homes already have a resident dog or two so it is difficult to find these particular dogs a forever home.” 

Fargo Brewing will hold a beer release during which four of the dogs from the cans will stop by the brewery. The brewery also plans to donate any profits from the limited release to the rescue organization.

Meet rescue dog Nyx
Meet rescue dog Bizzy

Please adopt shelter pets. And if you can, please consider adopting a senior pet. Seniors already know so much and their hearts are open to love. with more to give back than you ever imagined! There is nothing I love more than a senior” dog or cat! They are some of the best pets you can invite into your life.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Anyone who believes that money can not buy you happiness has never paid an adoption fee!

When you buy an ‘Adopt Don’t Shop’ pin badge £1 goes to help PupAid in their fight to close #puppyfarms! Get yours at ADOPT DON’T SHOP PIN.

9-year-Old Pavel Sells His Custom Pet Paintings For Food and Supplies For Animal Shelters

Even the youngest of us can make a sea change in society only if we have the determination and dedication to do so. This is being proven by Pavel Abramov, who took up the responsibility of helping an animal shelter. The boy sells custom pet portraits in exchange for food and other supplies for the animal shelter. 

Pavel Abramov paints one of his pieces of art to help animal shelters

This idea came to his brilliant little mind when his family lost their pet “Barsik”. It had a great impact on his juvenile mind and since then he couldn’t bear to see stray animals suffering. About one year ago, Pavel and his mom Ekaterina Bolshakova started the “Kind Paintbrush” project.

Living in Arzamas city in Russia, the mom-son duo has also been managing “What a little volunteer is capable of?” This is a group on VK- a Russian social media site. It shows how a child is capable of bringing about huge changes. They don’t get any funds from any organization; neither do they have a manager or employees. It’s just the two of them and their patrons.

Pavel at a local animal shelter.

Pavel makes a contract with pet owners whereby the boy sells custom pet portraits of their pets in exchange for food, medicines, toys, etc., for dogs living in the animal shelter. What is more interesting is that he meets the pets whom he drew after finishing the painting. He likes getting to know about the rescue story of every single pet, of how they came to live with their current family.

Pavel and a cat ‘model’.

The 9-year-old kid is the youngest among all the volunteers of the sole animal shelter in Arzamas. It cares for more than 100 dogs and thus needs pet supplies regularly. Pavel sells custom pet portraits to the pet owners and in return asks for whatever supplies the shelter requires at that time.

Ekaterina Bolshakova says that the whole family takes pride in their son’s project “Kind Paintbrush”. As every kid of his age, Pavel wants to do several things and thus runs short of time. He wants to become an architect and build an animal shelter. Well, for now, what he is doing is enough because not every boy sells custom pet portraits in exchange for food and other supplies for a shelter!

You can see more of Pavel’s works here: Pavel’s Gallery For Rescues

Pavel’s art sells for supplies for rescues.

Thank you Pavel, you are a true HERO!!

Pet Therapy ‘Pet Shed’ Lunched At The James Cooke Hospital

When you have to spend a long time in a hospital bed it can be hard not seeing much of your friends – especially the four-legged kind!

But not anymore – Staff at the Trinity Holistic Centre at The James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough have pulled out all the stops to open up their own pet shed.

The purpose-built facility in the holistic centre garden now provides an opportunity for families to bring in small animals such as dogs, cats and rabbits so that patients can be reunited with their much-loved pets – providing they are well enough to leave the ward.

Patients will be accompanied by a staff member or therapeutic care volunteer from South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust throughout their pet therapy session and strict hand washing rules will be in place to comply with infection control rules.

The pre-arranged visits can be for up to an hour, but for safety reasons only one pet can be on site at any time and they must be kept under control by a family member.

Lauren Farrow, Macmillan information and support centre’s business manager said: “We wanted to use our garden to help patients who are missing their pets to spend some precious time with them.

“Pets are such an important part of our lives and can really affect our sense of wellbeing so this project fits really well with the holistic work that we do.

“Guidance from the Royal College of Nursing champions the importance of this kind of therapy so we were keen to make it a realistic option for our patients. After all, patients who spend long periods of time in hospital can actually have a quicker recovery if they have access to their pets.”

The Pet Shed was officially opened by Middlesbrough Mayor Andy Preston and patient Darren Strafford.

Darren, 50, of Appleton Wiske, has six dogs and is currently in hospital for up to six months after breaking his leg in two places in a sky diving accident.

He said: “I think it’s a fantastic idea. Dogs offer calmness and lift the mood and this gives you the chance to bring in your own dogs which is much more special.”

This project has been made possible thanks to the kind sponsorship of Middlesbrough and Teesside Philanthropic Foundation’s Golden Giveaway, Ageing Better, Serco and friends and family of Christine Wall.

Trinity Holistic Centre is a charitable organisation supporting patients, carers and staff at James Cook and at the Friarage Hospital in Northallerton.

The service is dependent on the generosity of its volunteers, supporters and fundraisers.

The Protect All Wildlife Online Store Is Now OPEN!

Protect All Wildlife are advocates for wildlife and expose animal abuse and abusers wherever in the world they are. We will NEVER stop fighting for better animal rights and welfare.

We are proud to have financially supported charities like DSWT, Thula Thula Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre, Lion Aid, The Orangutan Foundation, Elephantopia and PupAid through taking part in sponsored runs, skydiving and abseiling events.

Proceeds from sales go towards my various fundraising activities for animal charities. To date Protect All Wildlife have raised over £25,000 for animals.

There is NO excuse for animal abuse EVER!

Check out our store at https://protect-all-wildlife.ecwid.com/

Christmas Offer: Get a festive 25% of ALL orders over £25:00

This Is Why You Should Never Ride On The Back Of An Elephant If You Are Travelling In Asia!

Elephant rides, an ‘essential’ part of your Asian holiday?……..

Elephant rides are an attraction regularly offered to tourists in several Asian countries including Thailand. But to get there, the animals undergo a very particular training that is actually akin to real torture.

Between 35 and 40,000, is the number of wild Elephants that remain in Asia, according to estimates. A figure to which should be added the more than 15,000 domesticated Elephants. If you go to Asia one day, you will certainly meet these majestic pachyderms with big ears. You may even be asked to ride on their backs for a ride.

Millions of tourists enjoy this ‘attraction’ every year in Asia, especially in Thailand. Nevertheless, it hides a reality that few tourists are aware of: to get there, the animals suffer a real torture. If the words can seem strong, they are not, as all those who have seen with their eyes what is really happening. Indeed, to be trained, Elephants undergo a ritual called “phajaan”.

The principle is simple: “break the spirit” of the Elephant. As two globetrotters, Seth and Lise, explain, “the origin of phajaan comes from the ancestral belief that one can separate the mind of an Elephant from its body so that it loses its reflexes and instinct natural wilderness and be completely under the control of man “. Concretely, it is to submit the Elephant until he agrees to do everything asked of him.

…..IF ONLY THEY KNEW!!!

Beaten, hungry and sleep-deprived

From a practical point of view, it is only by using violence that the trainers achieve it. Phajaan lasts between 4 and 6 days and is carried out on young Elephants. The animals are separated from their mothers and locked in narrow cages where they are chained. Without being able to struggle or even move a limb, they are then repeatedly hit in strategic places, the most sensitive.

THE PHAAJAN

In addition to being beaten, Elephants are kept awake, deprived of food and water under the eyes of trainers (“mahout”) who recite prayers that can be translated as “Elephant, if you stop fighting, we do not you’ll hurt more, “says a documentary. The torture does not stop until after several days, when the trainers believe that the spirit of the Elephant is broken, that his behaviour has changed.

Out of his cage, the animal appears submissive, impressed by the fear of the man who subjected him to this torture. Then begins a real training that will consist in teaching the Elephant all the necessary commands or gestures intended to amuse the tourists. Once the specimen is formed, it can be used as an attraction for most of its life.

50% of Elephants die during the ritual

It is estimated that half of the Elephants would not survive phajaan. Others would become aggressive: about 100 mahouts are killed each year by their animals. Still others would go insane or have trouble with their experience, rendering them unusable for attractions. Most would then be killed.

The surviving Elephants are used to wander the tourists, to beg or for work. In order for them to remain submissive, they are given a few booster shots by hitting them or pressing the sensitive spots again. In tourism, an Elephant can spend the day carrying people without a minute to rest, eat or drink. The rest of the time, most animals are tied up so that they are not dangerous.

A life that would often lead to the appearance of disorders including neurological. “If you ever have a chance to spot domestic Elephants, watch them,” Seth and Lise explain. “Chance or not, all the Elephants we’ve seen had signs of recent abuse, scars, obvious signs of poor health, some are more damaged than others, and it’s extremely rare to see one of these well-treated animals. “.

“It is largely because of tourists that this business works, so it is up to tourists to make the right decisions. The future and especially the well-being of thousands of Elephants is at stake,” they conclude in their blog.

Tourists have a choice – Elephanst DON’T!!


Please SHARE this page to raise awareness to the so-called Elephant tourist ‘industry’ in Asia. You can also SUBSCRIBE to Protect All Wildlife to receive news and updates direct to your inbox. h