Daisy The Dog Was Saved From Euthanasia And Now She Happily Runs Around In A Wheelchair

DAISY NEVER LETS HER DISABILITY STOP HER LOVING LIFE

Daisy the adorable terrier didn’t have the best start in life. The pretty tan shorthair cross was born with an underbite, two wobbly front legs that never managed to work properly, and was abandoned when she was only two months old.

Daisy was abandoned on the streets of Bellflower at the age of 2 months, and was found by an animal control officer. 2 months passed and the shelter scheduled to euthanize her, but luckily, a volunteer from A Home 4Ever Rescue pulled her out just in time. Several months later, she found her forever home.

Sheena Main was looking for a special needs dog to adopt and found Daisy in the summer of 2011. Daisy was born with a congenital deformity in her front legs and uses a wheelchair to assist her walk. After learning that disabled dogs have a difficult time finding a forever home and are usually the first ones to be listed to euthanize at the shelter, Sheena was heartbroken.

And although Daisy managed to get around just fine on her paralysed paws, Sheena was concerned about the strain it was putting on her spine, so had a pink glittery wheelchair made especially for her.

DAISY MUST BE ONE OF THE HAPPIETS DOGS YOU WILL EVER SEE

In Sheena’s eyes, Daisy is a strong girl and she doesn’t pity her disability and feel the same way about all disabled dogs. She decided to use social media platforms to share Daisy’s story and raise positive awareness for all disabled dogs.

HITCHING A RIDE

With Daisy’s sweet nature, spunky attitude, and underbite smile, she has gained many fans from all around the world and I am beyond grateful. I hope that Daisy’s story and photos will continue to spread, and more people will open their hearts to dogs with special needs.

You can help dogs just like Daisy and other disabled animals by supporting the Miracle’s Mission Centre For Disabled Animals rescue, rehabilitate and rehome sick, injured and disabled animals worldwide by donating ANY amount, large or small, at ALL Animals DESERVE a 2nd Chance In Life!

“Animals using wheelchairs and prosthetics can live as good a life as fully able-bodied animals and that is what we want to show people” ~ Victoria Bryson, Miracle’s Mission founder.

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Who Saved Who: The Beautiful Story Of Double-Amputees Soi Dogs Gill Dalley And A Dog Called Cola

GILL DALLEY AND COLA

A double amputee has struck up an incredible bond with a rescue dog who only has two legs himself.

Gill Dalley, 57, lost both her legs to a virulent infection in 2004, a year after she left her home in Leeds to enjoy her retirement in Phuket, Thailand, with husband John, 67.

The pair had set up a charity called The Soi Dog Foundation to help the animals on the island and it was during a rescue that Gill waded through some water to reach the animal and contracted the infection.

Doctors were forced to amputate both legs as a result and she has had to get used to getting around on a pair of prosthetic limbs ever since.

GILL DALLEY

In the July of 2016, Gill heard of a dog called Cola, who had been brought to a vet in Bangkok by his owner after a neighbour cruelly hacked off both his front legs with a sword in revenge for the ten-month-old puppy chewing his shoes.

Walking into the vet’s Gill Dalley took one look at the terribly injured young dog and instantly knew she was going to adopt him.

What’s more, Cola seemed to know it too.

Despite the fact that he had had his two front legs cruelly hacked off with he started barking with excitement, rolling onto his back for tickles like he’d never done before.

What had caused this extraordinary connection?

Quite simply, the pair were kindred spirits.

Gill instantly knew what the dog, who had been given his own prosthetic legs, would be going through and decided to bring him back to her home.

She explained: “The moment I saw Cola, there was an instant bond between us.

“It was quite incredible, like nothing I’ve ever experienced before.

“It was as if we’d known each other all our lives yet we’d never met.

“I knew immediately that not only did I have to help him, but that I was in a unique position to be able to.

“I knew exactly what he was going through – I’d been through it myself.

“I could help him build up his strength, perfect his walking and take care of the sores the prostheses would inevitably create, like no one else could.

“In turn, he instantly trusted me in a way he didn’t trust any other person.

“He knew we were the same.”

COLA IS RESCUED

Gill managed to get a fresh set of prosthetics made for Cola and the puppy, who was then 16 months old, could do everything that other dogs can do.

Gill added: “He has to be the happiest dog on this earth – he never stops smiling, he grins from ear to ear and never looks sad…

“People say Cola’s lucky to have found me, but I think it’s the other way around.

“I’ve just learned so much from him.”

Sadly Gill passed away on the 13 February 2017. Every year, Soi Dog Foundation recognises this date as International Gill Dalley Remembrance Day, the day they commemorate their leader and co-founder.

Gill was the heart and soul of Soi Dog. Despite the many challenges that life presented to Gill, she always put the needs of homeless animals first.

Note: The neighbour was prosecuted and was sentenced to just a month in jail.

THANK YOU FOR CARING

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65 Jindo Dogs And Puppies Are Rescued By The Humane Society International After Notorious South Korean Dog Meat Farm Closes For Good

A dog meat farm on South Korea’s famous Jindo Island, which for more than 20 years bred and slaughtered Jindo dogs for human consumption despite them being the country’s national dog breed, has closed its doors for good after coming to an agreement with Humane Society International/Korea and Korean animal protection group LIFE. The 66 year-old dog farmer Mr Kim, who also runs a local restaurant where his dogs were on the menu, was found by local authorities to have breached the Animal Protection Act by killing dogs in front of each other, after concerned residents reported hearing dogs vocalising in terror on the farm. Instead of setting up business elsewhere, the farmer signed a contract with LIFE to give up dog farming forever and agreed to remove dog meat from the menu at his restaurant.

Being Korea’s national dog breed didn’t save countless Jindo dogs from slaughter, but at least for some of them the nightmare is now over. A dog meat farm on South Korea’s Jindo Island has closed its doors after 20 years of breeding and slaughtering dogs for consumptions – including the iconic Jindo.

After coming to an agreement with Humane Society International/Korea (HSI/Korea) and Korean animal protection group LIFE, the farmer signed a contract to give up dog farming forever and agreed to remove dog meat from the menu at his restaurant.

LIFE and HSI/Korea saved all 65 Jindo dogs and puppies found languishing in small, wire battery cages on the farm. A statement reads, “The South Korean government designated the Jindo the country’s 53rd Natural Monument in 1962, nominally affording them protection under the Cultural Heritage Protection Act, meaning the farmer could face additional charges.”

Nara Kim, HSI/Korea’s campaign manager, said, “All the dogs on this meat farm are Jindos which is supposed to be Korea’s national dog breed.  But instead, these poor dogs have been locked away in filthy wire cages, fed on restaurant waste, denied even the most basic care and any level of human kindness.

“As a proud Korean I always find it upsetting to see the cruelty of dog meat farms, but it felt especially shocking to see our country’s national dog breed being exploited like this on Jindo Island. I shed tears when I saw the killing area where I know dogs were killed in front of each other. There was a big pile of collars where they were electrocuted.”

She added, “Thankfully, together with our friends at LIFE, we have been able to get these dogs out of that horrible place and ensure that no animals will ever suffer again in those cages. The authorities will also pursue cruelty charges against the farmer.

“As the Animal Protection Act currently offers little protection for dogs on dog meat farms, it’s encouraging to see law enforcement officials making use of those few regulations at their disposal.

“But in order to fully crack down on this brutal industry, we will continue to campaign for a ban on the breeding, slaughter and sale of dogs for meat.”

While only a small minority of South Koreans consumes dog meat, with more and more dog meat farmers retiring from an industry “without a future”, dog meat farms and vendors are still active in the country.

In-Seob Sim, president of LIFE, said, “I feel anger beyond misery. We boast about Jindo dogs being our national dog, but at the same time they are on someone’s dinner table. This is a direct example of the duality of humans, but also of the contradiction in Korean society.

“Is there really a difference between a treasure Jindo dog and an edible Jindo dog as the dog meat traders encourage us to think? The answer is a definite NO! They are both just Jindo dogs, almost perfect pets for companionship with people.”

The Korean jindo

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22 Photos Of Dogs Who Have Just been Rescued Will Inspire You.

GOING HOME

As you might have guessed, dogs can be unsure and scared during adoption. Why wouldn’t they be? The process involves removing them from the environment they have likely known all their life! They are then placed in a place that is completely new to them. Luckily, this is not always the case. Some dogs are happy to go through this and instantly adore their new owners! We are glad to report that such meetings have been caught on camera. We are sure the following images will warm your heart.

FIRST BITE!

Excitement can occasionally bring out the animal in all of us. And who can blame us when it happens? It sometimes leads to adorable moments as you can see in the photo below. It shows the dog biting his new owner’s nose. “Got your nose” is certainly fitting for the moment you see here.

FIRST BITE

WORTH KEEPING

She found the adorable dog alone on the roadside. As a compassionate human being, she wanted to take the poor pooch to the local shelter. However, her plans took a 360 when she saw adorable the dog was!

WORTH KEEPING

FIRST SELFIE

Well, this is one pup you can take as many pictures with as you want. She was not hesitant about posing for a photo. That ear-to-ear smile is truly endearing. We bet the guy was happy he took her home with him!

FIRST SELFIE

PUT YOUR HANDS UP

Can you guess what this cutie thinks about the adoption? We certainly can. Her face clues us in on how she feels! The same thing goes for her new owners. It looks like a bright future is in store for them.

PUT YOUR HANDS UP

LOVING LOOK

Oh, will you just look at how much they adore each other? Skeptics might think she only wants to get more treats! However, we are certain that they will both love the coming years they will have together.

LOVING LOOK

HAPPY SMILE

It seems like this dog is truly living the life. What else could be better than a hug from your owner and sunshine on your face? Nothing at all. We would not be surprised to see this photo on a shampoo ad.

HAPPY SMILE

LOVEY-DOVEY

When you adopt a dog, hugs and kisses should be automatic. Sorry, we don’t make the rules. Tata the pup clearly enjoys this sweet moment. We can totally see why adoption made her as happy as can be!

LOVEY-DOVEY

ROCK-A-BYE BABY

She could not help cradling her new dog as soon as they met each other. She seems to adore him completely, and he does not mind the attention one bit. He seems to enjoy it a lot, as a matter of fact.

ROCK-A-BYE BABY

HOLD ME CLOSE

Emotional doesn’t even begin to describe what it is like when you take in a new pet. This guy was so touched by the surprise his significant other had in store for him! He loves it and will love it forever!

HOLD ME CLOSE

A PERFECT MATCH

You will have so much fun when your dog can pose like this with you. Can you see how he manages to make the same expression as his owner? Not a lot of dogs can do that, and we feel jealous of this guy.

A PERFECT MATCH

BEAR HUG

Aww, that look of contentment on this boy is nothing short of adorable. Moreover, we just love how the dog is looking at him to see that he is delivering the best hug in the world. They sure make a good pair!

BEAR HUG

OLD & YOUNG

When her husband died, she felt more than a little lonely. We understand, of course. It’s a good thing her son was brilliant enough to get her a new dog. No doubt about it, this dog will be cared for very well.

OLD & YOUNG

WHO’S MORE EXCITED?

Getting a dog will never not be exciting, but the kids especially enjoy it. After her parents introduced her to Harley the pup, she was absolutely thrilled! It must’ve been unbelievable that they could keep him!

WHO’S MORE EXCITED?

“I’M GOING HOME!”

His collar matches her shirt, and his smile matches her smile. This is a match made in heaven! Max was happy that he finally found someone to take good care of him. What a good pair these two make.

“I’M GOING HOME!

NAP TIME

When dogs are comfortable, sleeping will be very easy. The pup was very contented in the arms of this woman right here. We would feel the same way as well! There is nothing for him to worry about now

NAP TIME

KISSES GALORE

Although there are dogs that go for hugs, some of them like kisses better. Of course, these acts are always reserved for their owners! How would you react if your dog gave you a kiss fest as thanks?

KISSES GALORE

SECRET TIME

When you have a secret you just want to share, it’s not wise to do so. Unless you do it to your pet! The trustworthy creature here seems to enjoy her secret. Maybe it has something to do with adopting him.

SECRET TIME

PUPPY EYES

Kodak is probably named for his photogenic smile, and we love it. The beautiful Labrador and Shephard mix was saved from a hoarder. We are glad that he finally found his forever home!

PUPPY EYES

BETTER AND BETTER

You can see the first time Krystal cradled her new pup below. There is a world of difference between the first and second photo. The latter was taken after she was cleaned up and taken in by her new mum.

BETTER AND BETTER

PURE BLISS

We know dogs are unable to see as many colors as we can, but it seems apt to say that this dog can see all the colors of the rainbow. When you find your new home, it will suddenly seem like life is better!

PURE BLISS

EVERYTHING THE LIGHT TOUCHES

We are sure you remember the iconic scene in Lion King when this line was delivered: “Simba, everything the light touches is our kingdom.” For this pup, this was the version he got: “Everywhere the grass touches is your playground.”

EVERYTHING THE LIGHT TOUCHES

HOME AT LAST

Rex did not have an easy life before Dan decided to adopt him. Before this moment, he got severe neck trauma and suffered from this affliction. It seems like he can now forget about those days and look forward to new ones!

HOME AT LAST

Please ALWAYS consider adopting your next dog. Saving one dog will not change the world, but for that one dog, the world will change forever!

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An Elephant Graveyard: 282 Elephant Deaths Registered In Odisha In 3 Years

In Odisha, rapid urbanization, mining and industry, expansion of linear infrastructure and fragmented habitats have sent Elephants into a growing conflict with humans over the last several years.

Seven Elephants WERE Electrocuted by Sagging Power Lines

 A total of 282 Elephants died in Odisha from 2018 through August 31, 2021, the state’s forest minister Bikaram Keshari Arukha said.  The highest number of Elephant deaths (93) took place in 2018-19, followed by 82 in 2019-20, 77 in 2020-21 and 30 till end of August this year. 

As many as 43 of the Elephants were electrocuted, seven were killed by poachers, 13 were hit by trains, four in road accidents and 59 died in other accidents. The rest succumbed to infections — 18 died of anthrax, six of herpes and 77 of other diseases. As many as 34 Elephants died of natural causes and 21 due to unknown reasons. 

A train stops to let an elephant & calves cross the East Coast Railway In odisha
Unfortunately not all elephants are so lucky!

The eastern state had 1,976 Elephants in 2017, according to the last census. This was an improvement from 1954 in 2015 and 1930 in 2012, the minister noted at the state assembly.

“Odisha’s forest and environment department has selected 14 traditional Elephant corridors in the state for smooth movement of the Elephants,” he added.

The Minister also informed that the state lost 17 Leopards in this period which included two Royal Bengal Tigers, killed in electrocution and disease separately in 2018-19. Five Leopards were killed in poaching. The Special Task Force of Odisha Police, State Forest department as well as the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau have seized at least 29 Leopard skins since April 2020. Nine Leopard skins were seized by Forest officials in Kalahandi alone in July this year.

Three of the leopard skins seized by forest officials in kalhandi

The Tiger population in Odisha plateaued at 28 between 2014 and 2018, according to the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA).

The number of Leopards in the state, however, more than doubled to 760 in that period, according to the NTCA report released December 21, 2020.  

‘Leopards occupy areas vacated by Tigers and this is one of the main reasons behind the increasing Leopard population in the state, according to LA Singh,  former wildlife research officer of Similipal Tiger Reserve

Leopards also breed more often than Tigers and can survive in almost any type of habitat and need less space, he added. Tigers, the biggest of the big cats, thrive in larger forest expanses, said the expert.

a royal bengal tiger Similipal Tiger Reserve

To curb poaching of wild animals, the State Government has formed anti-poaching and anti-smuggling squads in the sensitive areas.

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Asian Elephants Face New Threat Due To The Illicit Traffic In Skin Trade For Traditional Chinese Medicine And Luxury Goods

A female Asian elephant skinned in Myanmar.

Once targeted for their ivory tusks, Asia’s already endangered elephants are facing a new threat to their survival: Poachers in Myanmar and elsewhere are selling their hides to be turned into purported cures for stomach ulcers and cancer as well as jewellery and prayer beads for sale in China. Elsewhere, the skins are being turned into luxury leather goods from golf bags and designer boots to wallets, belts and even motorcycle seats.

Trafficking in Asian elephant hides has grown over the past four years from small-scale sales of skins to a wholesale commercial trade. In Asia, this includes sales on open, online forums as well as by some Chinese pharmaceutical companies, according to the U.K.-based wildlife conservation group Elephant Family, which believes most of the Chinese products come from illegally traded Asian elephant hides. Legally licensed trade in hides from four African countries is strictly controlled and regulated.

Conservationists fear that elephant skin may even begin to replace ivory as a motive for poaching, and that any legal trade provides a loop-hole for illegal trade. For these reasons, they have urged countries to completely ban its importation.

PIECES OF ELEPHANT SKIN

Asian Elephants live across a vast range of 13 countries, from India to Indonesia, yet their global population of 30,000-50,000 is barely 10% of their African cousins. While all Elephants face the threats of habitat loss, conflict with people, and poaching for ivory, Asian Elephants are also threatened by illicit live trade for the entertainment industry and, most recently, by poaching for the illegal trade in their skins.

An investigation by Elephant Family into the illegal trade in Asian Elephants since 2014, through research, analysis and field investigations. Initially monitoring live trade, they were alarmed to discover a marked  increase in poaching in Myanmar, and seeing images of carcasses found with strips of skin missing but with the rest of the body left largely intact. They began investigating the trade in Elephant skin products both online and in physical markets and, in 2016, exposed this trade to the international conservation community at the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), in Johannesburg, South Africa.

The first conservation organisation to investigate the Elephant skin trade chain, their research revealed that this trade continues to grow both in scope and in volume. Traders are diversifying and experimenting.

Initially, powdered Elephant skin was sold as a traditional medicine ingredient. Then a new trend emerged where dried Elephant skin was carved and polished into prayer beads and other Chinese collectibles, with traders extolling the qualities of the blood-red hue in the translucent subcutaneous layers.

There is now an increase in the online advertising of powdered Elephant skin for sale to, apparently exclusively, buyers in mainland China. Videos posted on marketing sites show images of backyards in Myanmar and Laos being used by traders to carve up chunks of Elephant skin, remove coarse hair with blow-torches and dry it in ovens before grinding it into a fine powder. It is then packaged for sale as Traditional Chinese Medicine for stomach ailments. Field investigations revealed that while some consumers are satisfied with these prepared products delivered to them by courier, more discerning buyers in China’s cities prefer to buy whole skin pieces complete with creases and hair to prove their authenticity, before grinding them into powder themselves.

The main source for Elephant skin is, at present, Myanmar, where officials have identified a poaching crisis that has developed rapidly since 2010. But traders have also mentioned other Asian Elephant range countries. Undoubtedly, the vast majority of known importers, online traders, physical salespeople and consumers are in China. The product labels are printed in Chinese, online traders communicate in  Mandarin and prices are quoted in Chinese currency. In early 2018, the investigation found Elephant skin products on sale in Yunnan, Guangdong, and Fujian provinces of China.

Like many forms of illegal wildlife trade, traffickers are exploiting a traditional, usually medicinal use, to create new trends that drive demand, and allow them to profit from poaching. Of particular concern is the discovery that Chinese pharmaceutical companies are advertising the sale of medicine that contains Asian Elephant skin derivatives, and that China’s State Forestry Administration has apparently issued licenses for these products.

At a time when China has shown commitment to ending its domestic trade in Elephant ivory, it would be troubling and perverse to find that, at the same time, it is creating a new legal demand for Elephant skin products. Conservationists, law enforcement specialists and many governments agree that domestic wildlife markets facilitate the laundering of illicit commodities while simultaneously placing increased demand on law enforcement agencies as they attempt to address a growing and illegal wildlife trade with limited resources, inadequate criminal justice responses and institutional corruption.

The report outlines Elephant Family’s findings and provides evidence of a profoundly worrying trend in Elephant skin trade that severely threatens already fragile populations of Asian Elephants. Moreover, this new trend could easily spread to Africa as has been seen with other species. As one trader told Elephant Family investigators “it’s only skin – who cares if it comes from Asian Elephants or African Elephants”.

A trader in Xishuangbanna, China, weighs a piece of Asian elephant skin in August 2016. This 420.3g piece would cost about $335

The report aims to provide greater insight into the illicit trade in Asian Elephant skin. We also raise critical questions that need answers, and make recommendations to guide urgent action by key stakeholders.

Key Findings Of The Report Found:

Since 2014, the trade in Asian Elephant skin has expanded from small-scale use to wholesale commercial trade as traffickers stimulate demand.

The first account of manufacturing Elephant skin beads was posted online in 2014. Elephant skin powder is now a dominant commodity sold as a medicine for stomach complaints.

Manufacture of Elephant skin products is taking place in Myanmar, Laos and China. The market in China is where skin products can reach several times the value at source. Elephant skin beads and powder are mainly traded through open online forums such as Baidu, and private personal messaging platforms such as WeChat. Traders use only Chinese language on forums and quote prices in Chinese currency.

The primary source of Asian Elephants used in the skin trade now appears to be Myanmar where poaching incidents have increased dramatically since 2010, with Elephant carcasses found with their skin removed entirely or in strips. Most traders also confirm that Elephant skin products use Asian Elephants, a species protected under Appendix I of CITES.

Elephant skin products have been found in physical markets in Mong La, Myanmar, and Xishuangbanna, Yunnan province, China and in January 2018 were also found in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China.

Documentation shows that China’s State Forestry Administration (SFA) issued licenses for the manufacture and sale of pharmaceutical products containing Elephant skin. These commercially produced products, claiming to contain African and Asian Elephant skin, were advertised for sale by several Chinese companies.

AT RISK

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Killed By Poachers Before It Had A Chance To Live. Pregnant Rhino And Calf Shot Dead By Poachers In Pilanesberg National Park

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No chance: An unborn Rhino calf who died in its mother’s womb after she and its sibling were shot dead by poachers in South Africa
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Heartbreaking: The markings around the mother’s horn show that the poachers had made an attempt to cut it off, but fled the scene when park staff arrived

The Rhino was heavily pregnant and roaming Pilanesberg National Park in Mogwase, north-west South Africa, with its calf when they were hunted down for their horns.

These heartbreaking images show an unborn Rhino calf who died after its mother and sibling were shot and killed by poachers.

Photos show the poachers began hacking off the mother’s prized horn, but they were interrupted by park rangers and fled before they had time to remove it.

When park staff tried to save the unborn calf, it was found to have died inside its mother’s womb.

Pilanesberg National Park wrote on its official Facebook page: ‘There are no words.

‘Mom and calf shot and killed by poachers. Horns are still on as the murderers fled the scene when they heard a game drive approach. Mom looks very pregnant as well. We are devastated.’

Pilanesberg National Park added in the post that a reward will be issued for any information leading to an arrest and prosecution of the poachers.

A spokesperson for the park told MailOnline that the mother Rhino was aged eight and the calf just two years old. The unborn foetus would have been due in February next year.

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Killed: The heavily pregnant Rhino and its calf lie by the roadside where they were shot

‘We have lost 16 Rhino and 3 unborn calves so far 2017 – that we are aware of,’ the spokesperson said.

‘This loss is not due to lack of interest or effort from Park management, as this is a large park with many valleys and hills, which is a difficult territory to operate in.’

Since 2007, more than 6,000 Rhinos have been shot and butchered for their horns in South Africa alone.

The majority of those have come in the last four years with around a thousand being killed every year since 2013.

Sometimes the Rhinos are shot dead, in other cases they are brought down with a tranquiliser gun before having their horn hacked off – leaving the Rhino to wake up and bleed to death painfully and slowly.

The province of KwaZulu-Natal, which has the greatest density of Rhino in South Africa, has seen 139 slaughtered already this year.

Despite countries such as China, Vietnam, South Korea, Malaysia and even India believing Rhino has medicinal values, repeated studies have not found any evidence to support the claims.

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Sad: Park rangers and guests gather at the heartbreaking scene in Pilanesberg

Rhino horns are made from a protein called keratin, the same substance that human fingernails and hair are made of. The horn is essentially just a compacted mass of hairs that continues to grow throughout the animal’s lifetime, just like human hair and nails.

It is similar in structure to horses’ hooves, turtle beaks, and cockatoo bills – however these animals are not hunted and slaughtered in the same way.

Tragically tradition and cultural beliefs in some Asian countries mean the demand for Rhino horn has not waned despite just some 20,000 white Rhino being left in the wild.

Poachers are now being supplied by international criminal gangs with sophisticated equipment to track and kill Rhinos. Based on the value of the Asian black market, Rhino horn price is estimated at $ 65,000 USD per kg*. In the near past, the Rhino horn price soared up around $65,000 per kilogram. This price hike turned the Rhino horn more valuable than gold and many other precious metals, also many times more worthy than Elephant ivory. (*2020 figures)

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The Barbaric ‘Tradition’ Of ‘Breaking The Spirit’ Of Elephants For Their Use In The Tourism Industry

breaking The Spirit of the elephant

The use of elephants in the tourism industry has become incredibly popular. Vacations boasting everything from a chance to ride on an elephant, to seeing them paint, or even getting a massage from an elephant have popped up all across Asia. While these might appear to be fun activities for you and your family, the reality is that the experience is anything but for the elephants.

Although elephants are incredibly intelligent and docile by nature, there is very little about the behaviors exhibited by captive elephants in the tourism industry that is natural. To get these wild animals to interact with humans, they must undergo an extraordinarily cruel breaking process, called “Phajaan,” that renders them submissive to their human trainers.

Breaking Baby Elephants
Baby elephants are taken from their mothers at a very young age, usually three to six years old, but often younger. After a young elephant is in the captivity of its handlers, the aim of the Phajaan program is to break its spirit. Babies will be kept in small crates similar to those found in the intensive pig farming industry. Their feet will be tied with ropes, their limbs will be stretched, they will be repeatedly beaten with sharp metal and other tools, they will be constantly yelled and screamed at, and they will be starved of food. Bull hooks (a tool used in most forms of elephant control) will be used to stab the head, slash the skin and tug the ears.

The next time you see an Asian elephant used in trekking, elephant rides, movies, in a circus or any other form of entertainment, take a look at the state of its ears. Captive elephants often have shredded or torn ears from their tissue being ripped and pulled away in the training process. They also often have scars on their foreheads from deep lacerations caused by beatings.

Ropes are used to tie and stretch the elephant’s limbs, these will eventually be replaced with tight, constricting chains. The Phajaan may last for weeks and they have no rest from physical torture and mental domination. Gradually, their spirits break and their handlers achieve control.

parar1
The ‘Crush’

The “Bond” Between Trainer and Elephant
Traditionally in Eastern Asia, a mahout will be sole charge of a single elephant. As a mahout ages, his elephant is passed down through his family line. An elephant’s mahout will not be involved in the physical abuse during Phajaan. In the final stage of the Phajaan, the elephant’s mahout will bring the animal its first meal with water, and will be the one to “release” the elephant and lead it away from the crate.
After weeks of torture, of mental and emotional abuse, of loneliness, confusion and

separation, the elephant sees this human figure as its savior – the one it trusts. This is just another stage of mental and emotional manipulation, of course, but it is how a particular mahout gains such immense control over its animal.

This video illustrates the cruelty of this process. We will warn you, it is graphic.

What You Can Do
Getting the chance to interact with a baby elephant might seem like an incredible experience, but given the immense cruelty and abuse that that elephant has to endure for these interactions, is it really worth it? Asian elephants are highly endangered animals and are often targeted by poachers who capture them from the wild and sell them into the tourism industry. By visiting attractions that feature captive elephants and paying to ride or interact with one, you become complicit in this injustice.

We can all help to end this cruelty by boycotting tourism attractions that feature captive elephants. If you are headed to Thailand and want to experience elephants in a humane way, check out elephant sanctuaries like Elephant Nature Park or Boon Lott’s Elephant Sanctuary. These organizations are helping to spread the truth about the cruelty inherent in elephant tourism while providing a sanctuary for animals who have been rescued from such attractions.

But remember, these elephants would not need to be in sanctuaries if the elephant tourism industry didn’t exist so please share this knowledge with others so we can see the cruelty against elephants end, once and for all.

Please SHARE to raise awareness of the plight of ‘tourist industry’ Elephants. Please SUBSCRIBE to receive news and updates straight to your inbox.

The 2021 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Have Just Announced Their Finalists And Here Are 40 Of The Best Photos

Born from a passion for wildlife, and decades of experience living & working in East Africa, The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards began its life modestly in 2015 as a photographic competition.

Since then, steered by its founders, Paul Joynson-Hicks MBE and Tom Sullam, it has grown into a globally renowned competition seen by millions of people every year, and always with wildlife conservation at its heart.

The free competition, open to wildlife photography experts and novices, celebrates the hilarity of our natural world and highlights what we need to do to protect it. From a surprised otter to a swearing turtle, Comedy Wildlife’s photographs transcend cultures and ages to bring a smile to everyone’s face.

Find out more about the Comedy Wildlife mission HERE.

#1 Time For School

Time For School

“A smooth-coated otter “bit” its baby otter to bring it back to and fro for its swimming lessons” Cleo Kee Teo.

Michelle Wood, who is part of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards team said “The uniqueness of Comedy Wildlife compared to other photography competitions is the comedy aspect which can be a split-second decision to push the button at the right time,” she said. “We would probably say it’s a good idea to take your camera or camera phone with you whenever you are out and about, just in case that special moment arises,” she suggested always being ready to capture some amazing shots.

“And you have to be patient, very, very patient. Wildlife photography involves a lot of waiting around, Comedy Wildlife photography even more!! But the competition is free and so it is always worth entering your photo or video. By getting involved with the competition, even buying a print or calendar, you are directly helping us support our conservation charity and highlight our message, which is at the heart of the Awards.

#2 I Guess Summer’s Over

I Guess Summer's Over

“I was taking pics of pigeons in flight when this leaf landed on birds face” John Speirs.

#3 Ninja Prairie Dog!

Ninja Prairie Dog!

“When this Bald Eagle missed on its attempt to grab this prairie dog, the prairie dog jumped towards the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow. A real David vs Goliath story!” Arthur Trevino.

According to Michelle, how the Awards decide on what charity to support each year depends on a variety of factors. “We look at a range of factors, including sustainability, reach, location, species, long term goals. Save Wild Orangutans is an amazing initiative, set up by the Gunung Palung program helping the local population live and work in harmony with the Orangutan population and their habitat. We all share this world and have to work together to preserve it. This charity aligns with our core conservation message and we will do everything we can to shine a light on their work, through coverage of the competition.” 

The Category and Overall Winners of the competition will be announced on the 22nd of October, and I can’t wait to see who takes the cake (and our hearts). In the meantime, the 2021 competition finalists will be exhibited at The Photography Show in Birmingham.

#4 Did I Say You Could Take My Picture?

Did I Say You Could Take My Picture?

“I followed this Ruby-Crowned Kinglet for about 15 minutes as it hopped from one branch to another in fast succession. I think it knew I was following it because, all of a sudden, it just stopped and stared at me for all of about 3 seconds!” Patrick Dirlam.

#5 Peekaboo

Peekaboo

“I was photographing a group of goslings for a while when one broke away from the pack. It hid behind the leg of a bench for a few seconds before poking its little head out to say hello.” Charlie Page.

#6 Monday Morning Mood

Monday Morning Mood

“I took this shot while photographing a group of Pied starlings perched in a tree at the Rietvlei Nature Reserve in South Africa. It perfectly sums up my mood on most Monday mornings :)” Andrew Mayes.

The finalists include 42 images, plus the Portfolio and Video category entries. 2021’s shortlist showcases the biggest mix of animals seen in the competition so far. The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards team notes that among the entries are a laughing vine snake from India, a trio of strutting Gentoo penguins on the beaches of the Falkland Islands, and a Kangaroo performing a picture-perfect Pavarotti impersonation in Australia.

In a press release, Paul, the co-founder of the competition, said that the team has been overwhelmed with the number and quality of the entries they received this year. A whopping 7k photos were submitted to the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards for consideration from every single corner of the globe.

“It was an amazing turnout, especially given the impact of the pandemic. The huge number of images we receive every year illustrates the appetite there is to engage with conservation and reminds us that wildlife truly is incredible and hilarious and, we must do all we can to protect it,” Paul said.

#7 Don’t Worry. Be Happy!

Don't Worry. Be Happy!


 
A Dragonfly early in the morning on a flower looks into my camera and it seems as if it laughing. The year 2020/2021 was very hard for everybody because of Corona. But when you go outside and watch carefully the Beauty of our nature, then problems seems to get less for me. So if I have a bad day this image make me give a smile back” Axel Bocker.

#8 Quarantine Life

Quarantine Life

“Isolated inside with your family eager to get out and explore the world? These eastern raccoon kits are too. Just when you think there’s no more room in the tree hollow, mother raccoon appears and displays just how compact the space is. The babies clambered all over their mom and each another, struggling to take a look at the exact same time.  This photo was taken in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. After exploring a particular area with numerous tree hallows, I identified it as a hot spot for raccoon families. Since raccoons will move from den to den, often not spending more than one night at a time in a particular den, locating an area with numerous options is key to locating the animals. I stumbled across this family and immediately worked on leveling the camera with the hole to prevent an upward angle. When the camera and tripod were ready, the baby raccoons were extremely curious (and cooperative), sticking their heads out for a closer look!” Kevin Biskaborn.

#9 Mr. Giggles

Mr. Giggles

“Grey seal pup appears to be giggling. I loved the expression captured. It looks so human-like.  I was lying on a rocky beach for hours, as motionlessly as possible, patiently waiting for seal life to unfold around me. This seal pup came onto the shore for a bit of rest and ended up sleeping on its chosen rock for hours before the incoming tide forced it to move more inland. Occasionally, it would stretch and yawn and it was one of the yawns that led to this expression, looking as if the seal was giggling.” Martina Novotna.

#10 See Who Jumps High

See Who Jumps High

Chu Ha Lin.

#11 Draw Me Like One Of Your French Bears

Draw Me Like One Of Your French Bears

“This young Kodiak Brown Bear sauntered down the riverbed and stopped across from me. She proceeded to start making herself a bear bed pulling back the sand with her gigantic claws. Once she had her bed just how she wanted it she laid down, rolled over on her back and started smiling and me! And she didn’t stop smiling! I would have to say she was the most provacative bear I had ever seen!” Wenona Suydam.

#12 Majestic And Graceful Bald Eagle

Majestic And Graceful Bald Eagle

“Bald Eagles will use the same nest for years, even decades, adding new material to it at the beginning and throughout the nesting season. Normally, they are highly skilled at snapping branches off of trees while in flight. Possibly tired from working nonstop all morning on a new nest, this particular Bald Eagle wasn’t showing its best form. Yes, sometimes they miss. Although this looks painful, and it might very well be, the eagle recovers with just a few sweeping wing strokes, and choses to rest a bit before making another lumber run.” David Eppley.

The photographer who took the overall best picture will win a one-week safari with Alex Walker’s Serian in the Masai Mara, in Kenya, as well as a unique handmade trophy from the Art Garage in Dar es Salaam, in Tanzania.

A panel of experts will judge the finalists, and it’s quite an impressive turnout! The panel includes wildlife photographers Daisy Gilardini, Tom Laman, and Will Burrand-Lucas, travel editor Neil Stevenson, TV presenter Kate Humble, actor and comedian Hugh Dennis, co-founder of The Born Free Foundation Will Travers OBE, Managing Director of Serif, developer of award sponsor Affinity Photo Ashley Hewson, ThinkTank’s Simon Pollock, image expert Celina Dunlop, Amazing Internet’s Andrew Skirrow, and Bella Lack, the “formidable ambassador for conservation.

#13 Operatic Warm UPS

Operatic Warm UPS

“The kangaroo looked like he was singing ‘the hills are alive, with the sound of music’ in the field.” Lea Scaddan.

#14 Dancing Away To Glory

Dancing Away To Glory

“A young langur sways its body to give an impression that its dancing.” Sarosh Lodhi.

#15 Attitude!!

Attitude!!

“Males of these species of lizard chooses higher elevations to monitor their territory and display. Caught this particular male roosting on the twig of a bush during high heat summer.” Aditya Kshirsagar.

#16 Before And After Coffee

Before And After Coffee

“Baby Great Horned Owl shows human-like reaction as one wakes up before coffee and after having a cup. I was avidly watching the two cute owlets in the nest, hoping it would wake up and move. It took a pretty long time, as both babies were too sleepy and were nuzzling each other, sleeping with mouths open. When one finally started to stir, this is what I saw. It is too precious, half opening both eyes, opening one and finally both eyes looking like it was startled.” Nat Tan.

#17 Ouch!

Ouch!

“A golden silk monkey in Yunnan China – this is actually a show of aggression however in the position that the monkey is in it looks quite painful!” Ken Jensen.

#18 We’re Too Sexy For This Beach

We're Too Sexy For This Beach

“I was lying on the beach during a stretch of fair weather at Volunteer Point in East Falkland, just waiting to capture a Gentoo Penguin jumping out of the surf to land on the beach.  To my delight, a trio emerged from the water and walked straight in my direction.  I really enjoyed photographing this moment as it seems to capture some sassy personality displayed by these individuals” Joshua Galicki.

#19 The Butt Dunk / The Face Plant / The Shake Off / The Final Scratch

The Butt Dunk / The Face Plant / The Shake Off / The Final Scratch

“An elephant expresses his joy in taking a mud bath against the dead trees on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zimbabwe on a hot afternoon.” Vicki Jauron

#20 How Do You Get That Damn Window Open?

How Do You Get That Damn Window Open?

“This raccoon spends his time trying to get into houses out of curiosity and perhaps also to steal food” Nicolas de Vaulx.

#21 Laughing Snake

Laughing Snake

“Vine snakes are very commonly seen snakes in western ghats of India. When approached they show aggression by opening their mouth wide open. Nothing to scare of this beautiful harmless Vine snake.I was happy to find it and smiling and  It looks like he was smiling back at me.” Aditya Kshirsagar.

#22 Smoked Deer For Dinner

Smoked Deer For Dinner

“I have been following the family of a tigress called Paaro in India’s Jim Corbett National Park for many years. This is her daughter who has stood on her hind limbs to be able to scratch her face with a log. But, it appears as if she is carrying the log on her shoulders.” Siddhant Agrawal.

#23 Let’s Dance

Let's Dance

“Two Kamchatka bear cubs square up for a celebratory play fight having successfully navigated a raging torrent (small stream!)” Andy Parkinson.

#24 The Green Stylist

The Green Stylist

K Gurumoorthy

#25 Flautist

Flautist

“I spent my days in my usual “gopher place” and yet again, these funny little animals haven’t belied their true nature.” Roland Krenitz.

#26 Foot Jam

Foot Jam

“There is a great big pine tree with a small to medium sized hole in it near my house where a young racoon has called this home for the past year. Well this year it appears that the little racoon has outgrown it’s tiny home as it barely fits!” Brook Burling.

#27 Directing Penguin

Directing Penguin

“Two Gentoo penguins having a discussion after coming out of the surf” Carol Taylor.

#28 Monkey Riding A Giraff

Monkey Riding A Giraffe

“During a game drive we found a group of monkeys playing around with each other, jumping up and down from a bare branch.It was a joy to watch. After a while I saw a giraffe coming from the right. By the moment the giraffe did pass the branch, one of the monkeys was on his post to ride the giraffe :-)” Dirk-Jan Sttehouwer.

#29 Treehugger

Treehugger

“This Proboscis monkey could be just scratching its nose on the rough bark, or it could be kissing it. Trees play a big role in the lives of monkeys. Who are we to judge…” Jakub Hodan.

#30 Are You Talking To Me? / Big Smile / Fluff / Lol

Are You Talking To Me? / Big Smile / Fluff / Lol

“While trying to make proper pictures with flash I visited two groups of wild horses for two years. Every now and then they didn’t try to eat my flashes or run over the stands and they posed for me.” Edwin Smith.

#31 Shhhh! I’m So Hungover It Hurts

Shhhh! I'm So Hungover It Hurts

“Burrowing owl youngsters are so amusing to watch.  This burrowing owl caught my eye because he looked like he a hangover.” Anita Ross.

#32 The Photo-Bombing Wave

The Photo-Bombing Wave

“Polar Bear mom and cubs frolicked in the icy waters of the Arctic.  They kept dipping under the water and once came up together with this amusing pose.  A tender moment is shared by mom and one cub while the other photo-bombs with a wave to the onlookers.  Or, it sure looked like a wave…..” Cheryl Strahl.

#33 Yes, I Did It

Yes, I Did It

“A frog climbed a flower from a plant, and when he made it to the end he laughed celebrating his success” Dieky Oesin.

#34 Leaning Post

Leaning Post

“A young cub decides to use his patient mother as a leaning post, the birds in the trees requiring closer inspection” Andy Parkinson.

#35 Peek-A-Boo

Peek-A-Boo

“I was photographing a group of goslings for a while when one broke away from the pack. It hid behind the leg of a bench for a few seconds before poking its little head out to say hello.” Pal Marchart.

#36 Cotton Eyed Joe

Cotton Eyed Joe

“Ever seen a grizzly bear square dance? Just need a jug, some spoons and a banjo. Gets ‘em every time”. Rick Elieson.

#37 Welcome To Nature!

Welcome To Nature!

“A red damselfly welcomes us into the world of macro nature. It was so amazing to see it climb up the straw, and pause at the intersection to say hi! :)” Mattias Hammar.

#38 Sweet Lips Are For Kissing!

Sweet Lips Are For Kissing!

“This picture was taken at Curaçao, Dutch Caribbean.  Usually box fishes are difficult to take pictures of, since they do not have a problem of a diver coming close, but if you show interest, they always turn the back and not the face to you. That’s why I tried to swim 0.5m above the fish and showing no interest at all to him. The same time I had my camera not in front of me, but below at my chest pointing to the bottom. When the right moment had come, I turned the camera 90 degrees to the front and just point and shoot, hoping to have the fish in focus. Never expected to have its beautiful lips that close!” Philipp Starr.

#39 Just Checking

Just Checking

“A male Vervet Monkey was hanging around a bridge over the Luangwa River in South Luangwa National Park looking for some action (handouts from passersby).” Larry Petterborg.

#40 Missed

Missed

“Two Western Grey Kangaroos were fighting and one missed kicking him in the stomach.” Lea Scaddan.

Powys Animal Rescue Founder Among Volunteers Who Helped Transport Nowzad’s Dogs

Graham Geran  of the Wales Ape & Monkey Sanctuary in Powys collected a number of dogs.

GRAHAM GERAN WITH SOME OF NOWZAD’S DOGS

The founder of an animal rescue centre in Wales was among the volunteers who helped transport Pen Farthing’s cats and dogs.

Farthing arrived at Heathrow Airport with 173 rescues from his Nowzad animal charity in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday, August 29, and was met by a number of vehicles involved in transporting them to their quarantine centres.

SOME OF THE DOGS WHO ARRIVED AT HEATHROW

Among them was Wales Ape & Monkey Sanctuary founder Graham Geran, who had volunteered to collect some of the dogs in a special transport vehicle free of charge.

The animal rescue, based in Powys, is on the list of premises and carriers authorised by the Government for rabies quarantine in England, Wales or Scotland.

Graham said “I was up at three o’clock in the morning as I had to be in Heathrow for 7:30… and then it was a case of waiting for the checks and then get them from the plane into the quarantine centre.”

There were said to around 18 other vehicles involved in transporting the animals.

Speaking about the dogs, Graham said: “They came out of the crate and they were straight up jumping on us.

GRAHAM WITH ONE OF THE RESCUED DOGS

Graham also revealed that he had received ‘numerous phones calls’ from people wishing to adopt the animals after it was discovered he was involved in transporting them.

He added: “People want to adopt the dogs, so they will go out to quarantine and to good homes.

The animals, with an estimated total of around 100 dogs and 70 cats, are in quarantine kennels across the UK, with hundreds of people looking to adopt them.

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