Remembering When Meat Loaf Rescued A Puppy From A Dumpster While On Tour

Meat Loaf with Little Ms. Karma

Many abandoned dogs are rescued every day and when rock star singer Meat Loaf was on tour, the crew one night noticed someone left a puppy behind a dumpster. They decided to rescue the puppy and proceeded to feed, cuddle and take her to the vet.

They posted on their Facebook page a picture of the puppy they rescued. The puppy joined the band on the road and they named her Little Ms. Karma. The puppy temporarily joined them on tour and adjusted well as the band took turns giving her lots of love.

Meat said in the post “Some of you already know that the other night after our rehearsal, our crew saw someone dumping this beautiful baby girl behind a dumpster. They scooped her up and after a couple days of Vet visits, sleeping, lots of cuddles and settling into life on the road, Little Ms Karma, left us last night to go to her new forever home. We’ll miss her but she’s on her way to her new momma and sisters and a big ole ranch to run around and we’re even more excited that she’s staying a part of the extended Meat Loaf family forever!!!

But life on the road is no place for a dog and eventually, a forever home was made with the family of one of the crew. So Little Ms Karma said goodbye to the band to join one member of her extended Meat Loaf family who lives on a ranch with his wife and daughters. Remembering Meat Loaf’s famous Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Performance for “I’d Do Anything for Love” is truly reflected by the rescue.

Love is what makes us do things to have a little bit of heaven on earth. Love is also paying good karma forward and I think this is the main reason why Meat Loaf and his crew gave this sweet dog a whole lot of loving and a forever home.

Karma is much bigger now and has settled into her new life. She even has fans of her own!

Watch a video about Meat Loaf and Karma here:

Please share if you like this rescue story of love for Little Ms. Karma!

The Wildlife Friends Foundation Launches Largest Tiger Rescue In Thailand As Phuket Zoo Closes

The Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand (WFFT) is carrying out the largest tiger rescue in Thailand’s history as the renowned wildlife animal welfare and rescue organisation prepares to take custody of 11 tigers and two bears handed over by Phuket Zoo.

WFFT founder and director Edwin Wiek confirmed the news.

Edwin Wiek of the Wildlife Friends Foundation

“We are finishing off the new side enclosures for the Tigers right now, and we will be ready to pick up the first 4-6 in the coming week. We are still waiting for documents to move the Tigers, but I am pretty sure this ill be done by the end of the week.” Mr Wiek told Protect All Wildlife.

Part of the area at the WFFT site in Phetchaburi that the tigers and bears from Phuket Zoo will soon call home. Photo: Edwin Wiek / WFFT

Mr Wiek explained that he and Sangduen “Lek” Chailert, founder of the Elephant Nature Park, discussed the handover of the animals with the Phuket Zoo owners.

The zoo has been hard hit by the financial crisis brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving the facility without tourist visitors for nearly two years.

Despite previous encounters between WFFT and Phuket Zoo over the conditions many of the animals were kept in at the zoo, the parties set aside any animosity in order to determine the safe future for the animals, Mr Wiek noted.

Horrifying scenes inside abandoned Phuket zoo where starving animals are forced to live in squalor

“They were genuinely very concerned about the animals. They said they had refused offers for the animals’ skins and bones,” he said.

“As WFFT has the facilities and expertise to take care of large carnivores and currently houses more than 30 other bears, it was concluded that WFFT could provide the best life-long care for these animals which require urgent rehoming,” Mr Wiek explained. 

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand (WFFT) will also rehome two bears from Phuket Zoo. Photo: Edwin Wiek / WFFT

The rescue and rehoming of 11 Tigers to a sanctuary will be the biggest Tiger rescue in Thailand’s history. However, due to the financial impact of COVID-219, WFFT must first raise the funds required to rescue these 13 animals. As such WFFT is asking for financial support to undertake this historic rescue, he noted.

“This rescue will be no small feat for WFFT. The financial resources required to rescue and transport 13 large animals from Phuket to WFFT alone will be significant,” Mr Wiek said.

“Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic we have received more calls than ever from entertainment venues who cannot afford to feed their animals anymore. We try to help as many as we can. The fact is, though, that without financial support, we cannot help more.

“We are urging our friends in Phuket, in Thailand and around the world to please help with what will be a huge rescue, not only for WFFT, but for Tigers in Thailand,” he said.

WFFT is a registered foundation in Thailand. 

“In Thailand, like in every country in the world, animals are abused and exploited for profit and human gratification. There are many examples of animal exploitation within the tourist industry, for example, photo prop animals, animals performing in degrading shows, and elephant camps. Furthermore, there is still a thriving illegal trade in wild animals for pets and medicine,” the organisation explains on its website.

The top three major goals of the organisation are:

  • To rescue and rehabilitate captive wild animals and provide high-quality care and a safe environment for them to live for the rest of their lives, in a setting as close to nature as possible.
  • To campaign against all forms of animal abuse and exploitation in Thailand, work towards ending the illegal pet trade and discourage people from keeping all wild animals as pets. WFFT actively seeks to combat the illegal wildlife trade and to rescue animals from poor conditions or exploitation from human entertainment.
  • To provide veterinary assistance to any sick or injured animal; wild or domestic.

To learn more about Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand (WFFT), visit the official website here: https://www.wfft.org/

This video shows various animals including Tigers, Bears, and Alligators left for dead at Phuket Zoo due to the Coronavirus pandemic. The tourism industry all over the world has definitely been brought to a sudden halt but the animals who played a major role in that have also been abandoned. The clip was originally uploaded on YouTube and was shot by an Australian named Minh Nguyen, who lives and works in Thailand. 

“We are still fundraising for the tigers, and hopefully we will get some more much needed financial support in the weeks to come.” told Protect All Wildlife.

If you like to help fund this amazing rescue operation please donate ANY amount, large or small, at Phuket Zoo Animal Rescue.

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Juno The Missing Norfolk Lowland Search And Rescue Dog Found After Being Missing For Six Days

Norfolk Lowland Search and Rescue deployed their team to assist in the search for the their missing search dog Juno. They deployed foot teams, drones and the boat. Juno was spotted by one of drone pilot Paul as he flew his drone overhead, and he was able to confirm that she was alive when she looked up at the drone. They immediately tasked their boat which was nearby on the river as well as both of their foot teams to the location. She was recovered by the boat and brought back to safety before being taken to the vets for a check up.This is a brilliant result for all involved and a great example of Lowland Rescue teams working together.

Juno was missing for six days missing over Christmas.

There JUNO IS REUNITED WITH HER OWNER IAN DANKS

There was an incredible turnout to search for Juno. Juno has been found alive & well, and is now off the vets for a check up. Monitor the news and our social channels later today for more info and video footage. Well done to all involved. As a team, we are elated. Juno was spotted by one of our Search Managers, using one of our drone assets. Today was a great example of inter-team working.

JUNO

Please be thankful for these amazing people and their rescue dogs who go out in ALL weathers to rescue us in our time of need.

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A VIDEO OF A JCB RESCUING A BABY ELEPHANT FROM A DEEP PIT GOES VIRAL

A BABY ELEPHANT GETS A HELPING PUSH UP FROM A JCB

One lucky little Elephant has captured the hearts of people across the internet after it was rescued from a mud pit in the Southern India state of Karnataka.

A video of the rescue operation staged by state forest officials has charmed netizens, as it also shows what some people say was an appreciative gesture from the Elephant, who turned to address the crane that helped to dig it out.

the BABY ELEPHANT being rescued FROM A DEEP PIT by a jcb

The incident took place in Siddapura Village in Coorg district of Karnataka, reported Indian Express.

A good Samaritan recorded and shared the clip, which has been viewed over one million times on Twitter alone. The beginning of the video shows the Elephant struggling to climb up and out of a slippery mud put. Each time it tries, it slips back down the hole’s steep walls. Eventually, an excavator machine pulls in and begins to dig mud out from around the Elephant.

THE ELEPHANT KEPT SLIDING BACK INTO THE PIT

Bystanders can be heard cheering as the arm of the JBC crane reaches behind the Elephant and gives it a gentle push, giving it the boost it needs to finally get its feet back on solid ground.

The lumbering animal then turns back around to face its rescuers, bumping its head and tusk to the machine’s bucket in what some are viewing as a sign of appreciation. Onlookers can be heard cheering loudly as it does, then officials set off a small firecracker to encourage the Elephant to leave the area and return to the forest.

Sudha Ramen, Deputy Conservator of Forests, Tamilnadu Forest Department shared the video from her Twitter account. She told Newsweek, “Elephants are mostly human-friendly until they get aggressive stimulated by human behaviour or have some hormonal imbalances. They are known to recognize the aid received when they are in need.”

Even though this behaviour can be observed in subadult and adult Elephants, young ones are not as human-friendly or expressive.

She added that when such rescues happen in a crowded environment, the animal is usually in panic mode and may get aggressive because of human presence or too much noise.

“But in this situation not many outsiders were present. Still, I do not say that the animal returned a gesture in this case. It may be an exhibit of stress too,” Ramen told Newsweek, addressing the belief shared by many that the head bump was ‘thank you’ in the Elephant language.

Her tweet with the video has been viewed more than a million times. She credited the video to Indian actor Satish Shah who initially shared it on his Twitter page.

Sudha Ramen, Deputy Conservator of Forests, Tamilnadu Forest Department shared the video from her Twitter account.

The usage of machinery such as a JBC depends upon the terrain, the animal involved in the rescue, and other safety factors, according to Ramen. The vehicle often comes in handy as many of its features make it able to handle slushy, slippery ground, and many rescue operations are carried out in the forest or nearby in areas that are usually non-motorable larger vehicles.

“Such operations are done only in the presence of the forest officials and vet doctors, so the driver gets guided by them,” Ramen told Newsweek.

“This made my day 1,000 times. Kudos to the construction crew and operator. And Mr. Elephant is the classiest mammal I’ve ever seen,” commented one user.

While many appreciated the machine operator’s work, some also questioned the use of smoke crackers in the end.

“It seems the Elephant was actually very grateful to the JCB for helping her/him by doing a head bump with it. Instead of busting smoke to scare it away, we could be gentler next time by keeping some food nearby so that they can replenish and get busy without charging at anyone,” wrote another.

THE RESCUED ELEPHANT APPEARS TO THANK THE JCB

However, the rescue team is always advised to carry the smokers along for safety reasons, Ramen told Newsweek, saying it is not necessarily standard practice to use them but they are commonly deployed when herds venture into villages or human habitations.

“It is used on occasions to direct the animal back into the forest and also to protect the nearby people if the animal tries to attack them,” she said.

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‘IF THEY DIE, WE ALL DIE’ – DROUGHT KILLS IN KENYA!

The withered carcasses of livestock are reminders that drought has descended yet again in northern Kenya, the latest in a series of climate shocks rippling through the Horn of Africa.

Mohamed Mohamud, a ranger from the Sabuli Wildlife Conservancy, looks at the carcass of a giraffe that died from hunger. (AP Photo)

As world leaders addressed the global climate summit in Glasgow, pastoralists watched their beloved animals suffer from lack of water and food. Yusuf Abdullahi says he has lost 40 goats. “If they die, we all die,” he says.

Herder Yusuf Abdullahi walks past the carcasses of his forty goats that died of hunger in Dertu, Wajir County, Kenya. He said “If theY die, we all die!” (AP Photo)

Kenya’s authorities has declared a nationwide catastrophe in 10 of its 47 counties. The United Nations says greater than 2 million individuals are severely meals insecure. And with individuals trekking farther in quest of meals and water, observers warn that tensions amongst communities may sharpen.

Wildlife have begun to die, too, says the chair of the Subuli Wildlife Conservancy, Mohamed Sharmarke.

“The warmth on the bottom tells you the signal of hunger we’re going through,” he says.

Rain has failed for two seasons in the east African country, leaving families without enough food and water. It also has snuffed out pasture for livestock, crippling herder communities throughout the nation.

In September, Nairobi and aid agencies estimated that 2.1 million people in 10 counties were affected by the drought. The numbers are expected to rise to 2.4 million by this month, relief agencies reported.

The harrowing footage was taken by Kevin Mtai, a climate campaigner from Pokot in Kenya.

He said: “In Kenya we have contributed less carbon emissions, but we are the ones paying the highest price.

“Animals are dying and people are suffering because of the climate crisis.”

The children of herders walk past cattle carcasses in the desert near Dertu, Wajir County, Kenya. (AP Photo)

Experts warn that such climate shocks will become more common across Africa, which contributes the least to global warming, but will suffer from it the most.

“We do not have a spare planet in which we will seek refuge once we have succeeded in destroying this one,” the executive director of East Africa’s Intergovernmental Authority on Development, Workneh Gebeyehu, said last month.

As if in a macabre parade, cattle carcasses line the two sides of the dusty road leading into Biyamadow, a sleepy village in northern Kenya’s Wajir county.

The grisly spectacle of dismembered animals rotting beneath the scorching sun is the result of a prolonged drought that has been pushing pastoral communities here – and the livestock they exclusively rely on – to the brink of disaster, reports Aljazeera. 

“In 72 years of life, I have never seen something like this,” said Ibrahim Adow, a Biyamadow resident.

cattle carcasses line the two sides of the dusty road leading into Biyamadow, a sleepy village in northern Kenya’s Wajir county.  [Virginia Pietromarchi/Al Jazeera]

Gabriel Ekaale, a policy officer for the World Food Programme based in Lodwar told Sky News: “It’s estimated about 600,000 members of the population in Turkana County are in need of food or cash assistance.”

Kenya’s Catholic Bishops met in Nairobi this week to ask the country’s Catholic faithful to donate food to regions affected by severe drought, the Vatican News reports.

They released an open letter stating: “It is becoming clear that the frequent droughts that we are experiencing in many parts of our country are as a result of global climate change and environmental degradation.

“Here in Kenya, it seems our model of development has led to a culture of degradation of our environment and the depletion of our natural resources.”

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A TURKISH COMPANY MAKE ROOF TILES THAT ALSO DOUBLE AS BIRD NESTING BOXES

Today, approximately 55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, according to the UN. As a result, animals are forced to find ways to share these tight urban spaces with us humans, and it isn’t always straightforward. Birds are no exception. The creative designs could be key to solving a decline in urban bird populations.

TURKISH COMPANY HITIT TERRA MANUFACTURE ROOF TILES THAT DOUBLE AS BIRD SHELTERS

It all began when the Dutch product design agency Klaas Kuiken came up with the idea to design a roof tile that doubles as a bird house. The idea was pounced upon by Hitit Terra, a Turkish terracotta manufacturer based in the town of Çorum, which then started producing the bird nest tiles for the local communities.

Mahmoud Basic, the regional director for Turkish National Parks, told a local news website that the tiles were to be produced and distributed to the people free of charge.

The Hitit Terra founders, Cengiz Başaranhıncal and Ali Arslan, said that the idea to produce bird nest tiles came after they saw the design on social media. Ali explained that the price of the tile online came out at around $70* which, in his opinion, was too high and they started making their own product for a local market.

*The Dutch tiles they are referring to are in fact more than twice that price, so wherever they saw them for $70 was a bargain.

Hitit Terra’s bird nest tiles were tested by Afyon Nature Conservation and the 5th Regional Directorate of National Parks and re-designed according to the demand. They now produce 5 different tile designs that accommodate different bird species.

Ali Arslan, one of the company partners, said they started producing roof tiles with bird nests two years ago. They have sent 3 thousand products to various municipalities and institutions so far.

Explaining that they redesigned the birdhouse tile on the internet in a different way, Arslan said, “It was sold on the Internet for around $ 70 each. We thought it was a disadvantage to launch a product related to nature with such a high price. We get the point. Those who want, instead of bringing Turkey from abroad, we provide access to these products from Corum.”

“Demand is increasing as it is a new product” Expressing that the interest in bird nest tiles is increasing day by day, Arslan stated that until today, the 5th Regional Directorate of Afyon Nature Conservation and National Parks, municipalities of various provinces, companies and citizens who want to put them on the roof of their homes have produced 3 thousand pieces.

Stating that they received very good comments, especially on social media, Arslan said: “Especially in many buildings built during the Ottoman period, we see that there are such structures for the eating, drinking and sheltering needs of birds. We also wanted to keep the tradition of our ancestors alive and contribute to the animals we share our world with. We received very good reactions from all segments after production. Congratulations from many places, especially organisations and municipalities, and thanks on social media. This happiness leads us to make more quality and different products. The demands are increasing gradually as it is a new product.

A PRODUCT THAT CONTRIBUTES TO THE INCREASE OF THE BIRD POPULATION IN CITIES AND VILLAGES

In consultation with Vogelbescherming Nederland (Dutch organisation concerning the protection of birds), Klaas Kuiken originally developed “Vogelhuisjesdakpan” (the Birdhouse roof tile); the merge of a basic terracotta roof tile with the archetypal shape of a house. The result is a remarkable product that not only looks good, but also contributes to the increase of the bird population in cities and villages.

Inside the Birdhouse, underneath the roof tile, a carefully designed nesting basket made of wood and bird screen is attached. This nesting basket ensures good ventilation, prevents the birds from moving to other places underneath your roof and makes it really easy to clean the nest after a breeding period.

By installing one or more of these Birdhouse roof tiles, you ensure that birds are provided with a safe place to stay and raise their chicks. Instead of crawling under the roof tiles to build a nest, the birds can now linger in their own cosy cottage.

Bird houses are rooted in Turkish history. Back in the times of the Ottoman Empire, people would build elaborate architectural miniature palaces for the birds. Not only did they give animals shelter, they were also believed to grant good deeds to whoever built them.

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AN ABANDONED BABY FOX WHO CAN’T USE HER BACK LEGS GETS A SPECIAL WHEELCHAIR

ASIA IN HER WHEELCHAIR

One little fox has been gaining a lot of attention on social media, for one very unique reason. While she may have a disability, the folks at the Kentucky Wildlife Center are determined not to let that stop her.

When you walk through the doors at the centre, you may be greeted by the friendly house cat waiting for an ear scratch, or the curious bunny ready for her close up.

“That’s what we do here. We take care of every animal to the max,” said PK Blankenship.

For some, it’s a place to rest and rehabilitate before being released back into the wild. For others, it becomes their home.

“She’s come a long way, she really has. It used to be that there wasn’t any movement in those back legs at all,” Blankenship said.

Asia the three-month-old Red Fox became a “permanent resident” back in May. She was found by a Boone County couple who immediately called the center’s director, Sam Opp, when they saw Asia try to walk.

“They noticed she wasn’t using her back legs,” Opp said.

It’s a disability Opp believes Asia has had since birth, and something that would have left her defenceless, and eventually dead, in the wild.

“You would never know she can’t use those back legs. She thinks she’s a regular fox. She pounces like a regular fox. She jumps like a regular fox. She crawls over you like a regular fox,” Blankenship said.

But what you may not see on a regular fox is the shiny wheelchair.

“Sometimes it’s funny. We put her in it and she’s like a NASCAR race driver. She takes off,” Blankenship said.

While Asia may have the need for speed, learning to use the chair isn’t always a smooth ride.

“I’m not saying she won’t bump into something, it does frighten her. It’s just like as a child. She would tumble off her mom and shake it off,” Blankenship said.

Still a wild animal, there are days Asia isn’t in the mood for physical therapy.

“If she’s just having a bad day, she’ll get more free time, which is after every session anyways,” Opp said.

With the help of Opp, her handler Blankenship, and the wheelchair, she will most likely be able to walk using her back legs one day.

“She has shown improvement in using those back legs to actually stand on her own. She is a very determined fox kit. She’s not giving up and we’re not giving up on her either. We’re in it for the long haul,” Blankenship said.

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A 10-POINT BUCK SOUGHT SANCTUARY INSIDE A SOUTHERN MICHIGAN CHURCH ON THE OPENING DAY OF THE STATE’S DEER HUNTING SEASON

THE BUCK INSIDE THE CHURCH

On the first day of deer season for firearms in Michigan, a 10-point buck apparently sought to find refuge in Grace Christian Fellowship Church in Sturgis, breaking through a window and becoming a huge surprise to the pastors when they got to the church Monday morning.

“When Luke Eicher, Justin Wickey and Amanda Eicher arrived at the church this morning, they found signs of breaking and entering,” stated the church’s description on the video. “Little did they know that a 10-point buck had come for prayer in the auditorium on opening day of gun season.”

When the three walked into the church’s office Monday morning, they noticed light coming from a darkened window in the auditorium.

“When I peeked inside, I saw the window was broken and heard loud banging,” Amanda Eisher told Storyful. “My husband rushed in and found this 10-point buck. On the opening day of the gun season of all days!”

“I was just shocked by how high he could jump,” Amanda Eicher said. “I was amazed at how big he was.”

The buck didn’t appear to have any gunshot wounds and was bleeding just a bit from what appeared to be cuts from the glass, she told the Kalamazoo Gazette. Besides the broken window, the only other damage was blood stains on the carpet.

“There was some damage to the building and our pastors are a little traumatized,” the church reported. “But the buck left strengthened in the Lord to go face his battles.”

Credit: The Grace Christian Fellowship Church

Bird Aid : URGENT Help Needed For Hailsham Gull Sanctuary

A bird charity has very little time to save itself, and the thousands of injured gulls it cares for.

Bird Aid‘s sanctuary in Hailsham, East Sussex, houses 250 attacked or injured birds at any one time, including 100 permanent residents.

It needs £170,000 to buy the land it’s on, after an investor pulled out.

Owner Julia Gould said: “We need help, time is nearly out. We’re the only gull rescue centre in the country, we’re vital, without us thousands will die.”

JULIA GOULD WITH SOME OF HER GULLS

“I know they have a reputation for stealing people’s food, but they’re not nasty birds and they have no talons, no hooked beak, no weapons,” Mrs Gould said.

“It’s a shame Brighton or Sussex doesn’t adopt them as our county bird and do more to appreciate and protect them.

“The seaside wouldn’t be the same without them.”

Bird Aid began in Eastbourne at the home of Julia and Ian Gould. Julia had worked with garden birds and gulls for many years and decided to set up a separate charity dedicated to gulls. They had aviaries in the garden and four learning disabled adults who came for work experience. The facilities were limited so they decided to look for a bigger property. A large factor in their decision was an urgent need to give their, much loved, blind gull a better life by building him a bespoke aviary.

One of the Trustees said he wanted to give some of his own money to the Gould’s so that a larger place could be purchased. He said he was fully supportive of Julia’s work with the gulls and wanted Bird Aid to help as many gulls as possible. After a long search they found Hydeaway, which was perfect for the birds and would provide plenty of work for Learning-Disabled volunteers too. Hydeaway is set on a two-acre site which now has superb facilities that cannot be bettered by any rescue centre. 

 After a change in circumstances we have had to come to an agreement that Bird Aid has one year to raise enough money to buy this person out. If the money cannot be raised, then this centre of excellence for gulls all over Southern England will close.

Herring gulls are on the RSBPs red list for threatened birds, as the species has seen a sharp decrease in population over last 25 years.

Mrs Gould has been operating the centre for eight years and said she has seen some horrific injuries to the seaside birds.

One came in with a broken leg, wing and ribs after being “beaten to near death” by a man in Eastbourne. t recovered but due to neurological damage can never be released back into the wild.

“People attack them, throw them into bins, it’s horrendous,” she said.

Gulls from across the country are taken to Bird Aid, and people from all over the world ring Mrs Gould for advice on caring for injured gulls.

“People call them a nuisance, but they adapt to us. They’re not wanted on the beach, we keep building hotels, houses, towns on the beachfront and they’re not wanted there either.

“They need to live somewhere. They have a right to be here, and be treated kindly.”

If you would like to help you can donate here: Help Hailsham Bird Sanctuary

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Appeals For Information After A Staffordshire Bull Terrier Was Found Tied To A Tree And Abandoned In A Flooded Area

THE STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER FOUND TIED TO A TREE BY A METAL LEAD.

The RSPCA is appealing for information after a Staffordshire Bull Terrier was found tied to a tree in a flooded area in Croydon.

The female dog, now named Lorraine by RSPCA staff, was found off Kestral Way in New Addington in the old Pitch and Putt site on an unused footpath which had become severely flooded. She had been tied to a tree by a metal lead and was scared and barking.

Torrential rain had formed a river around her on the footpath which was approximately 1.5ft deep.

RSPCA Inspector James Whipps attended and rescued the dog on Sunday 31 October.

He said: “This poor dog was terrified when I arrived. The area was completely flooded around her and she’d been tied to a tree and abandoned. I rescued her and took her to our RSPCA Leybourne Animal Centre in Kent where she is now getting some much needed TLC.

“We know that people’s circumstances may change which means they can no longer care for their pets but there is never an excuse to abandon an animal like this. This dog was scared and cold and in danger due to the flooding. Abandoning a dog like this is just cruel.

“I’d urge anyone who saw anything in the area or who recognises this dog to please contact us, in strictest confidence, on the inspectorate appeal line on 0300 123 8018.”

Editor’s Note: Regardless of the dog owner’s circumstances, there is NO excuse for abandoning Lorraine. Tying her to a tree with no chance of escaping from the floods is DISGUSTING!!!!