Daisy The Dog Was Saved From Euthanasia And Now She Happily Runs Around In A Wheelchair

DAISY NEVER LETS HER DISABILITY STOP HER LOVING LIFE

Daisy the adorable terrier didn’t have the best start in life. The pretty tan shorthair cross was born with an underbite, two wobbly front legs that never managed to work properly, and was abandoned when she was only two months old.

Daisy was abandoned on the streets of Bellflower at the age of 2 months, and was found by an animal control officer. 2 months passed and the shelter scheduled to euthanize her, but luckily, a volunteer from A Home 4Ever Rescue pulled her out just in time. Several months later, she found her forever home.

Sheena Main was looking for a special needs dog to adopt and found Daisy in the summer of 2011. Daisy was born with a congenital deformity in her front legs and uses a wheelchair to assist her walk. After learning that disabled dogs have a difficult time finding a forever home and are usually the first ones to be listed to euthanize at the shelter, Sheena was heartbroken.

And although Daisy managed to get around just fine on her paralysed paws, Sheena was concerned about the strain it was putting on her spine, so had a pink glittery wheelchair made especially for her.

DAISY MUST BE ONE OF THE HAPPIETS DOGS YOU WILL EVER SEE

In Sheena’s eyes, Daisy is a strong girl and she doesn’t pity her disability and feel the same way about all disabled dogs. She decided to use social media platforms to share Daisy’s story and raise positive awareness for all disabled dogs.

HITCHING A RIDE

With Daisy’s sweet nature, spunky attitude, and underbite smile, she has gained many fans from all around the world and I am beyond grateful. I hope that Daisy’s story and photos will continue to spread, and more people will open their hearts to dogs with special needs.

You can help dogs just like Daisy and other disabled animals by supporting the Miracle’s Mission Centre For Disabled Animals rescue, rehabilitate and rehome sick, injured and disabled animals worldwide by donating ANY amount, large or small, at ALL Animals DESERVE a 2nd Chance In Life!

“Animals using wheelchairs and prosthetics can live as good a life as fully able-bodied animals and that is what we want to show people” ~ Victoria Bryson, Miracle’s Mission founder.

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Who Saved Who: The Beautiful Story Of Double-Amputees Soi Dogs Gill Dalley And A Dog Called Cola

GILL DALLEY AND COLA

A double amputee has struck up an incredible bond with a rescue dog who only has two legs himself.

Gill Dalley, 57, lost both her legs to a virulent infection in 2004, a year after she left her home in Leeds to enjoy her retirement in Phuket, Thailand, with husband John, 67.

The pair had set up a charity called The Soi Dog Foundation to help the animals on the island and it was during a rescue that Gill waded through some water to reach the animal and contracted the infection.

Doctors were forced to amputate both legs as a result and she has had to get used to getting around on a pair of prosthetic limbs ever since.

GILL DALLEY

In the July of 2016, Gill heard of a dog called Cola, who had been brought to a vet in Bangkok by his owner after a neighbour cruelly hacked off both his front legs with a sword in revenge for the ten-month-old puppy chewing his shoes.

Walking into the vet’s Gill Dalley took one look at the terribly injured young dog and instantly knew she was going to adopt him.

What’s more, Cola seemed to know it too.

Despite the fact that he had had his two front legs cruelly hacked off with he started barking with excitement, rolling onto his back for tickles like he’d never done before.

What had caused this extraordinary connection?

Quite simply, the pair were kindred spirits.

Gill instantly knew what the dog, who had been given his own prosthetic legs, would be going through and decided to bring him back to her home.

She explained: “The moment I saw Cola, there was an instant bond between us.

“It was quite incredible, like nothing I’ve ever experienced before.

“It was as if we’d known each other all our lives yet we’d never met.

“I knew immediately that not only did I have to help him, but that I was in a unique position to be able to.

“I knew exactly what he was going through – I’d been through it myself.

“I could help him build up his strength, perfect his walking and take care of the sores the prostheses would inevitably create, like no one else could.

“In turn, he instantly trusted me in a way he didn’t trust any other person.

“He knew we were the same.”

COLA IS RESCUED

Gill managed to get a fresh set of prosthetics made for Cola and the puppy, who was then 16 months old, could do everything that other dogs can do.

Gill added: “He has to be the happiest dog on this earth – he never stops smiling, he grins from ear to ear and never looks sad…

“People say Cola’s lucky to have found me, but I think it’s the other way around.

“I’ve just learned so much from him.”

Sadly Gill passed away on the 13 February 2017. Every year, Soi Dog Foundation recognises this date as International Gill Dalley Remembrance Day, the day they commemorate their leader and co-founder.

Gill was the heart and soul of Soi Dog. Despite the many challenges that life presented to Gill, she always put the needs of homeless animals first.

Note: The neighbour was prosecuted and was sentenced to just a month in jail.

THANK YOU FOR CARING

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22 Photos Of Dogs Who Have Just been Rescued Will Inspire You.

GOING HOME

As you might have guessed, dogs can be unsure and scared during adoption. Why wouldn’t they be? The process involves removing them from the environment they have likely known all their life! They are then placed in a place that is completely new to them. Luckily, this is not always the case. Some dogs are happy to go through this and instantly adore their new owners! We are glad to report that such meetings have been caught on camera. We are sure the following images will warm your heart.

FIRST BITE!

Excitement can occasionally bring out the animal in all of us. And who can blame us when it happens? It sometimes leads to adorable moments as you can see in the photo below. It shows the dog biting his new owner’s nose. “Got your nose” is certainly fitting for the moment you see here.

FIRST BITE

WORTH KEEPING

She found the adorable dog alone on the roadside. As a compassionate human being, she wanted to take the poor pooch to the local shelter. However, her plans took a 360 when she saw adorable the dog was!

WORTH KEEPING

FIRST SELFIE

Well, this is one pup you can take as many pictures with as you want. She was not hesitant about posing for a photo. That ear-to-ear smile is truly endearing. We bet the guy was happy he took her home with him!

FIRST SELFIE

PUT YOUR HANDS UP

Can you guess what this cutie thinks about the adoption? We certainly can. Her face clues us in on how she feels! The same thing goes for her new owners. It looks like a bright future is in store for them.

PUT YOUR HANDS UP

LOVING LOOK

Oh, will you just look at how much they adore each other? Skeptics might think she only wants to get more treats! However, we are certain that they will both love the coming years they will have together.

LOVING LOOK

HAPPY SMILE

It seems like this dog is truly living the life. What else could be better than a hug from your owner and sunshine on your face? Nothing at all. We would not be surprised to see this photo on a shampoo ad.

HAPPY SMILE

LOVEY-DOVEY

When you adopt a dog, hugs and kisses should be automatic. Sorry, we don’t make the rules. Tata the pup clearly enjoys this sweet moment. We can totally see why adoption made her as happy as can be!

LOVEY-DOVEY

ROCK-A-BYE BABY

She could not help cradling her new dog as soon as they met each other. She seems to adore him completely, and he does not mind the attention one bit. He seems to enjoy it a lot, as a matter of fact.

ROCK-A-BYE BABY

HOLD ME CLOSE

Emotional doesn’t even begin to describe what it is like when you take in a new pet. This guy was so touched by the surprise his significant other had in store for him! He loves it and will love it forever!

HOLD ME CLOSE

A PERFECT MATCH

You will have so much fun when your dog can pose like this with you. Can you see how he manages to make the same expression as his owner? Not a lot of dogs can do that, and we feel jealous of this guy.

A PERFECT MATCH

BEAR HUG

Aww, that look of contentment on this boy is nothing short of adorable. Moreover, we just love how the dog is looking at him to see that he is delivering the best hug in the world. They sure make a good pair!

BEAR HUG

OLD & YOUNG

When her husband died, she felt more than a little lonely. We understand, of course. It’s a good thing her son was brilliant enough to get her a new dog. No doubt about it, this dog will be cared for very well.

OLD & YOUNG

WHO’S MORE EXCITED?

Getting a dog will never not be exciting, but the kids especially enjoy it. After her parents introduced her to Harley the pup, she was absolutely thrilled! It must’ve been unbelievable that they could keep him!

WHO’S MORE EXCITED?

“I’M GOING HOME!”

His collar matches her shirt, and his smile matches her smile. This is a match made in heaven! Max was happy that he finally found someone to take good care of him. What a good pair these two make.

“I’M GOING HOME!

NAP TIME

When dogs are comfortable, sleeping will be very easy. The pup was very contented in the arms of this woman right here. We would feel the same way as well! There is nothing for him to worry about now

NAP TIME

KISSES GALORE

Although there are dogs that go for hugs, some of them like kisses better. Of course, these acts are always reserved for their owners! How would you react if your dog gave you a kiss fest as thanks?

KISSES GALORE

SECRET TIME

When you have a secret you just want to share, it’s not wise to do so. Unless you do it to your pet! The trustworthy creature here seems to enjoy her secret. Maybe it has something to do with adopting him.

SECRET TIME

PUPPY EYES

Kodak is probably named for his photogenic smile, and we love it. The beautiful Labrador and Shephard mix was saved from a hoarder. We are glad that he finally found his forever home!

PUPPY EYES

BETTER AND BETTER

You can see the first time Krystal cradled her new pup below. There is a world of difference between the first and second photo. The latter was taken after she was cleaned up and taken in by her new mum.

BETTER AND BETTER

PURE BLISS

We know dogs are unable to see as many colors as we can, but it seems apt to say that this dog can see all the colors of the rainbow. When you find your new home, it will suddenly seem like life is better!

PURE BLISS

EVERYTHING THE LIGHT TOUCHES

We are sure you remember the iconic scene in Lion King when this line was delivered: “Simba, everything the light touches is our kingdom.” For this pup, this was the version he got: “Everywhere the grass touches is your playground.”

EVERYTHING THE LIGHT TOUCHES

HOME AT LAST

Rex did not have an easy life before Dan decided to adopt him. Before this moment, he got severe neck trauma and suffered from this affliction. It seems like he can now forget about those days and look forward to new ones!

HOME AT LAST

Please ALWAYS consider adopting your next dog. Saving one dog will not change the world, but for that one dog, the world will change forever!

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Powys Animal Rescue Founder Among Volunteers Who Helped Transport Nowzad’s Dogs

Graham Geran  of the Wales Ape & Monkey Sanctuary in Powys collected a number of dogs.

GRAHAM GERAN WITH SOME OF NOWZAD’S DOGS

The founder of an animal rescue centre in Wales was among the volunteers who helped transport Pen Farthing’s cats and dogs.

Farthing arrived at Heathrow Airport with 173 rescues from his Nowzad animal charity in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday, August 29, and was met by a number of vehicles involved in transporting them to their quarantine centres.

SOME OF THE DOGS WHO ARRIVED AT HEATHROW

Among them was Wales Ape & Monkey Sanctuary founder Graham Geran, who had volunteered to collect some of the dogs in a special transport vehicle free of charge.

The animal rescue, based in Powys, is on the list of premises and carriers authorised by the Government for rabies quarantine in England, Wales or Scotland.

Graham said “I was up at three o’clock in the morning as I had to be in Heathrow for 7:30… and then it was a case of waiting for the checks and then get them from the plane into the quarantine centre.”

There were said to around 18 other vehicles involved in transporting the animals.

Speaking about the dogs, Graham said: “They came out of the crate and they were straight up jumping on us.

GRAHAM WITH ONE OF THE RESCUED DOGS

Graham also revealed that he had received ‘numerous phones calls’ from people wishing to adopt the animals after it was discovered he was involved in transporting them.

He added: “People want to adopt the dogs, so they will go out to quarantine and to good homes.

The animals, with an estimated total of around 100 dogs and 70 cats, are in quarantine kennels across the UK, with hundreds of people looking to adopt them.

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Pet Abduction To Be Made A Criminal Offence In Crackdown On Pet Theft

Ministers want to change the law so it reflects the severity of the pet thieves’ crimes by considering the emotional distress it can cause the animal and acknowledging that pets represent far more than just property to their owners.

  • Pet Theft Taskforce delivers report with recommendations to tackle reported rise of pet theft
  • Government working with the police to improve recording and tracking of pet abduction cases
  • Improvements to pet microchipping processes to support the identification of lost and stolen dogs

A new criminal offence for pet abduction is set to be introduced under government plans to crack down on pet theft following a reported rise in pets being stolen during the pandemic. The new law will recognise the welfare of animals and that pets are valued as more than property.

The new offence is one of several recommendations in a report published today by the Government’s Pet Theft Taskforce which was launched in May 2021. The Taskforce, made up of officials from Defra, the Home Office and the Ministry of Justice along with operational partners including the police CPS, Border Force and Local Government, considered evidence from academics, animal welfare organisations, campaign groups, enforcement agencies and industry experts.

Since its establishment, the Taskforce has considered available evidence from academics, animal welfare organisations, campaign groups, enforcement agencies and industry experts to help inform its recommendations.

The report found that seven in 10 of the animal thefts recorded by the police involve dogs. Evidence suggests that around 2,000 dog theft crimes were reported to police in 2020, causing considerable distress for owners and their pets alike. The price of some breeds increased by as much as 89% over lockdown as people spent more time at home, potentially making dog theft more appealing to criminals looking to profit from the spike in public interest in owning a pet.

The Taskforce’s recommendations include:

  • The creation of a new ‘pet abduction’ offence:Pet theft is currently treated as a loss of property to the owner, but we know that does not reflect the true severity of this crime. The new offence will prioritise the welfare of our pets as sentient beings and recognise the emotional distress to the animal in addition to its owner.
  • Identifying and tracking cases:Reliable data on pet theft is limited and improved recording and data collection about these crimes will build a stronger evidence base about the problem.
  • Improving the recording of ownership and transfer data:New requirements to register additional details and a single point of access to microchipping databases will support tracking lost and stolen dogs.
  • Tackling the fear of crime:Police will work together with partner agencies to raise awareness about police initiatives and prevention measures

These changes will make it easier for the police to track pet abduction incidents making it easier to clamp down on offenders. The Home Office will ensure that pet abduction is recorded in a consistent manner across police forces, while officials from each department will be able to review the way data is collected across the criminal justice system.

Pet microchip databases will also be made more accessible under the proposals. There are currently 16 microchipping databases in England, however the Taskforce found that they can be difficult to navigate for pet owners and law enforcement, making it difficult to trace stolen dogs. Under the new proposals a single point of access to all databases will simplify and streamline the system and more robust rules will also be introduced across all of the pet microchipping databases for recording the transfer of dogs to new owners to ensure full traceability.

Taken together, these proposals will make it far harder for thieves to steal and sell pets, will make it easier for the police to catch them, and will ensure that the impact on the animal is reflected in the sentences or penalties given to offenders.

The new measures will also allow the Government to capture more data on pet theft crimes and raise awareness of police activity in combatting the issue and actions owners can take to keep their pets safe.

Environment Secretary George Eustice said:

Pets are much loved members of the family in households up and down the country, and reports of a rise in pet theft have been worrying. Pet owners shouldn’t have to live in fear, and I am pleased this report acknowledges the unique distress caused by this crime.

Its recommendations will reassure pet owners, help the police to tackle pet theft, and deliver justice for victims. We will consider its findings carefully and work with colleagues across Government to start implementing its recommendations.

The Lord Chancellor, Robert Buckland QC MP, said:

Many of us have sought the companionship of pets during the pandemic which makes this crime even more cruel.

These proposals will make sure police can better identify and track down criminals who peddle in this heartless trade, whilst ensuring they are appropriately punished for their actions.

Home Secretary Priti Patel said:

Stealing a pet is an awful crime which can cause families great emotional distress whilst callous criminals line their pockets.

The new offence of pet abduction acknowledges that animals are far more than just property and will give police an additional tool to bring these sickening individuals to justice.

At the same time, police will continue to work to raise awareness about how owners can best to protect pets from being targeted.

Taskforce partner, Deputy Chief Constable Amanda Blakeman said:

The work of the taskforce means that police forces across the country will now be better placed to respond to pet theft through an improved recording process and a specific crime that recognises pets as valued members of the family with a significant emotional impact”.

We would also encourage anyone buying a puppy or dog to make sure that they are buying from a responsible and genuine home. Advice on checks that can help buyers make the right choices is available through Blue Cross or RSPCA website.

RSPCA chief executive Chris Sherwood said:

We’re really pleased to hear the Government’s Pet Theft Taskforce recommendations. Pet theft can leave families in utter turmoil and have serious welfare implications for animals ripped away from everything they know.

The new Pet Abduction Offence will acknowledge the seriousness of this crime and we hope this will encourage courts to hand out much tougher sentences to pet thieves. We’re also thrilled that the Government wants to simplify the microchipping database system and we believe this will help to tackle pet theft as well as other animal welfare issues and irresponsible pet ownership generally.

The police advise that dog owners should avoid leaving their pet unattended while out in public, vary their routines when walking their dogs and should take basic security steps at home such as checking locks on doors and garden gates. The Blue Cross has also published detailed guidance for pet owners on how they can protect their animals from theft.

The Taskforce’s recommendations are part of the Government’s commitment to further strengthening the UK’s position as a global leader in animal welfare standards, as outlined in the Action Plan for Animal Welfare, and follow Defra’s recent announcement of new measures to crack down on the illegal smuggling of dogs and puppies.

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CHARITY APPEAL TO HELP BUILD THE FIRST CENTRE IN THE UK FOR DISABLED ANIMALS

As thousands of disabled animals are put to sleep across the UK, animal welfare charity Miracle’s Mission is looking for help to build the UK’s first centre for disabled animals – where they can be rehabilitated before finding their forever homes.

Victoria Bryceson, founder of Miracle’s Mission, says that countless disabled dogs are euthanased unnecessarily, despite the fact they could have a good quality of life with the right physical therapy and prosthetics.

She says, “At the moment amputation of one leg is common practice with UK vets, as dogs can live very well and still be very active with three legs, especially if it is a back leg, as most of the weight is on the front legs.

“However, when it comes to a double amputation leaving the dog with two legs, the general vets that I have seen in the UK have said it’s definitely not possible to do this as the dogs won’t be left with a good quality of life.”

As thousands of disabled animals are put to sleep across the UK, animal welfare charity Miracle’s Mission is looking for help to build the UK’s first centre for disabled animals – where they can be rehabilitated before finding their forever homes.

Many people may not be aware that dogs who have wheels and prosthetics can live as good a life as a fully able bodied dogs – much like Ella, who was found wandering the streets of Egypt, paralysed from the back down after being thrown off the top of a building.

Miracles’ Mission brought her to the UK, giving her a second chance. A wheelchair for dogs was made so she could get around, and soon Ella was running around with other dogs, living life to the fullest. Victoria is looking to let owners know that their disabled dogs could live happily, too, if only given a chance.

She adds, “The specialist hospitals seem more open to it as they have more experience in the area, but even they have problems where most of their dogs in these conditions are euthanased – not because they need to be but because, in their words, it is the owners of the dogs who can’t cope with the thought of a two legged dog. So there is a huge need for education in this area, amongst the public, dog owners and vets.

“General practice vets that have seen my journey with double amputee dogs have said that they have had a huge education on disabled animals and they can now see the possibilities and potential of a disabled dog. They are now much more open to using wheels and prosthetics. Dogs using wheels and prosthetics can live as good a life as a fully able-bodied dog and this is what I want to show people.

“I was stopped so many times when I was with a double amputee dog, to ask about her wheels as people hadn’t seen them before. They told me stories about their dogs back legs deteriorating and they thought the only option was euthanasia, but now they would look into wheels.”

The new centre will provide dedicated care for the most vulnerable dogs and cats. Animals under its care will receive thorough veterinary assessments, MRIs, surgeries, the fitting of prosthetics, and doggy wheels. Their personalised rehabilitation plan will include physiotherapy and hydrotherapy as well as daily massage and TENS machine stimulation.

Victoria says, “The animals coming into our care will initially all be stray dogs with nowhere else to go and no one else to help them. They will either have been born with some sort of condition, such as a bent leg that they can’t walk on or they will have been in an accident – for example hit by a car or they will have been abused.”

Once the patients have been emotionally and physically rehabilitated as much as possible, Miracle’s Mission get to work to find them all forever homes.

Victoria explains, “We will offer a full rehabilitation programme right through from assessment to surgery to rehabilitation, recovery and re-homing. This is again why education is so important, so that people become open to adopting disabled dogs.

“If we don’t re-home the dogs the centre will be full on day one and then we won’t be able to help anymore, so it is really desperately needed that the dogs be re-homed.”

There already is a waiting list of disabled dogs, but Victoria cannot accept them until she is able to finance the centre.  She is currently crowd funding to raise £20,000 to secure a deposit for the centre, which if secured will be built in Yorkshire in 2020.

If you’d like more information get in touch by writing to info@miraclesmission.org

Paul Christian, founder of Protect All Wildlife and Patron of Miracle’s Mission.

Images by Andrew Price

Please help Miracle’s Mission by donating ANY amount, large or small here.

Two-Legged Street Dog That Was Shot In The Head Lives To Tell The Tale And Now LOVES Life.

AMIRA WHEN SHE WAS RESCUED

A two-legged street dog from Thailand that was shot in the head and left to die has been rescued by a Canadian family – and now even has her own wheelchair. Lara Pleasence, 51, from Montreal, Canada, first heard about Amira’s tragic story through the Soi Dog Foundation, based in Asia. Administrator and personal trainer Lara first saw Amira in a video posted by the rescue centre in Thailand in October 2020. “This poor dog who was born without legs, lived on the streets having litter after litter, then after nine years of struggling to survive, someone shoots her in the head,” Lara told Jam Press. “I just broke down and cried.”

Amira was treated for her head wound by the Soi Dog rescue centre who shared regular updates of her progress on social media. “Sweet Amira was always wagging her tail; it just broke my heart that she still trusted humans even after everything she’d been through. “I knew I had to contact the rescue to see if I could help in any way, maybe even offer to be her forever family, although they doubted that she would ever be well enough to travel.” After a tense wait, the Soi Dog Foundation contacted Lara to tell her that Amira had recovered enough to be put up for adoption. “I was so stoked and so worried about what my husband was going to say, since we already had three dogs,” Lara admitted. “There was something about Amira, this incredible connection I felt for her from the very first time I saw her. “I wanted to right all the wrongs that were done to her, I just felt compelled to try. “I wanted desperately to show her all the love, security, happiness that she deserved, that every dog deserves, and that this poor sweetie had been denied for so many years.”

AMIRA’S LOVING AND LIVING LIFE TO THE FULL

To qualify to adopt Amira, Lara and her family had to go through a strict application procedure – including a virtual home visit, interview process and form-filling. “I was made aware that we would have to pay for her to be flown to Canada since, because of Covid, they didn’t have travellers who could take her on the plane for free.” “I think I would have mortgaged the house to get this sweet girl here.” When Amira touched down in Montreal in April 2021 after a 22-hour journey – which cost $2,000 – it was love at first sight. Lara said: “My husband was none too happy about even the idea of another dog since we already had three, but I told him that I had never felt this way about any rescues that I had seen. “I was so excited that we were getting her, I was practically bursting, and he knew that fighting it was a lost cause – happy wife, happy life.” Amira came with her wheelchair, after a man in Vietnam made a custom one for her and it was gifted to the pup by Soi Dog. “She literally came bouncing out of her crate and jumped all over us like the happiest kangaroo you’ve ever seen.” “She’d been in it for over 22 hours and didn’t even have an accident!” “We couldn’t believe the joy she exudes.

She is a true miracle. After everything she’s been through, Amira is fun-loving and outgoing. “She’s so trusting, she loves everyone she meets. “She absolutely loves to be held in your lap and will sleep there for as long as you will let her. “She is resilient and doesn’t let her past hold her back from trying new things or doing something a bit scary like canoeing or going on our paddleboard. “She is obsessed with our bed… If we’re not home, we have to block the stairs because we can’t risk her falling. “How a street dog, with no front legs, knows how to climb stairs is just one of Amira’s many mysteries. “She’ll let me kiss her nose 50 times in a row, my other three dogs will eventually pull their head away, but not Miss Amira, she loves it. “She gets these crazy puppy moments where she runs around on her nubs and jumps up on the furniture then flies right back off it. “These moments make my heart smile because it’s like she finally doesn’t have a care in the world and can just be a dog. “No more struggling for food or to keep her puppies safe and fed or hiding from bad people.”

AMIRA IN HER WHEELS

Now, Amira enjoys a happy life spending her days with her family and playing at her favourite spot. Lara added: “She loves going to the dog park, even though many of the dogs get freaked out by the “transformer dog” with wheels and just bark at her.”

FROM STREET DOG TO CRUISING THE STREETS

In videos posted to Instagram (@amira.amiracle), Lara shares Amira’s adventures with her new set of wheels. In one comical clip, which has been viewed over 725,000 times, Amira runs after a cat and ends up doing a headstand when she hits a curb. “She just waits for me to pick her back up and she keeps on going like it’s no big deal,” said Lara. Another video shows her gradually getting better at walking in a straight line with her wheels. Followers of Amira’s page are in love with the pup, and she regularly receives gushing comments. One person commented: “So beautiful to see this! You’re amazing, sweet and strong Amira.” “Love u Amira very much,” said another viewer. “She’s amazing and you’re amazing with her,” added another person. Lara is grateful for all the support and says she is touched by the comments she receives. “The people who follow Amira on Instagram are the sweetest,” she said. “They are so happy that she has a family that loves her now. “Some say Amira’s posts are their daily dose of ‘good feels’ or that her videos are ‘good for the soul’. “People feel they need to thank me for taking her, which is so kind, but I always tell them that it is my privilege to give her the best life that I possibly can,” “It’s the least I can do for such an angel. “I can only hope that her page may inspire someone else to help a special needs dog or donate to an organisation like Soi Dog Foundation so they can continue their amazing work.”

The Story Of Camberley Kate: A Dog Rescuer Extraordinaire



Kate Ward’s nickname “Camberley Kate” is said to have been given to her by historian Sir Arthur Bryant in his book “The Lion and the Unicorn”. It became the title by which she became known to everyone.

Kate’s early history is somewhat hazy – When interviewed she stated that she was born in Middlesbrough on June 13th 1895, and remained proud of her Yorkshire roots. Orphaned before she was ten, she was brought up by an aunt in a strict religious atmosphere. As a young girl she went into service, in Yorkshire and eventually found her way to Camberley. In 1943 Kate bought a cottage in Yorktown, and soon afterwards took in her first stray, a dog which had been about to be put down due to lameness.

As word grew, the number of dogs in her cottage increased – some being tied to her door, some left in carrier bags, others brought in by the police or other agencies. At the end of her life she estimated that she had looked after more than 600 dogs and local vet Geoffrey Craddock, a great admirer of Kate work testified that they were well looked after. An entry in the 1957 directory FOR Camberley reads “Ward K 218 London Road., Cam., Dogs Home”. In 1976 she stated that she had 34 dogs, although by 1977 she had cut this down to 19, as she had been told to go easier at the age of 82! The growth of other dog rescue centres helped in this regard. She also had at least one cat.


Kate and her olive-green painted hand cart, labelled STRAY DOGS, was a familiar sight locally as she pushed it from Yorktown to Camberley each day, through the town centre and up to Barossa Common, on a route suggested by the police. Some of the dogs were allowed to ride in the cart, others were attached to it with lengths of string, and occasionally a favoured few ran loose alongside. Inside the cart, there was usually some meat for the dogs and a shovel to clean any mess away. The dogs were controlled with the help of a whistle. Locals became used to the sight of Kate pushing her cart along the busy London Road although it never ceased to amaze outsiders.

As a local celebrity Kate and her dogs were much photographed, a situation she tolerated as long as the photographer gave a donation for the upkeep of the animals. She also sold her own photographic postcards, and gave short shrift to those who tried to take their own pictures. Generous supporters gave money to assist her work and some even left bequests. She was scrupulous that this money should be used only for its intended purpose: the dogs had their own bank account, administered by 2 trustees. She left money in trust for the few dogs left at her death.

If you gave her some money, she would INSIST you take a photo. That way she could not be accused of begging.


A diminutive figure with her shock of white hair and her beret, Kate defended herself and her work passionately against her critics, such as those who wanted her out of the town centre or who regarded the dogs as dangerous or a health or traffic hazard. On one occasion she rammed a new car which was blocking her way. She also had a number of disputes with the authorities. These clashes were often recorded in the columns of the press. However she won the backing of the local police for her work in taking abandoned dogs in off the streets.

In 21 August 1969 Kate was in the Camberley News fighting plans to introduce a bye law making it illegal for dogs to be out without a lead. This followed complains from residents of new housing estates, and concerns about road accidents caused by stray dogs. In her customary forthright fashion she condemned “The Council is nothing more than a collection of dog-haters. I think this will be rotten. It means that dogs will be chained up all day”. A proposal to ban dogs from the new precinct in Camberley also met with a terse response, particularly since she was in the habit of shopping at Sainsbury’s and leaving some of the dogs tied up outside. When protests about the local drag-hounds running out of control when being exercised attracted her support Kate, in typical fashion, addressed her complaint directly to the King. The Royal family continued to be a favourite route for correspondence. When a local schoolteacher complained that she had seen her beat her dogs with a stick, Kate immediately wrote in protest to the Queen. This was not their first encounter – when Princess Elizabeth got married one of the dogs sent a present of a dog lead.


As these anecdotes show, Kate was an excellent publicist. A local policemen recalled that occasionally a dog would get loose and be brought to the dog pound. If the Police Station was empty she would pay the fine quietly and readily, but if there was an audience she would protest vocally!

Following a series of strokes old age and ill-health forced her to leave her cottage and her remaining seven dogs were put into kennels. Her last weeks were spent at Kingsclear residential home and she died on 4th August 1979. Her funeral was at St Michael’s, Yorktown.

Despite her avowed dislike of people, Baptist Minister the Rev Chris Russell who officiated at her funeral, remembers her private generosity to those in need. This aspect of her life she kept anonymous, passing on her donations through third parties.

After her death, Camberley vet Geoffrey Craddock was quoted in the Camberley News as saying “Camberley has lost its most celebrated and best known character. She will be greatly missed by those of us who had the rare privilege of knowing her”.


During her lifetime, Kate’s fame spread far and wide. She featured In the national press and on television programmes such as “Nationwide” and “Tonight”. was featured on NBC in the United States and her story appeared in publications across Europe from France to Rumania. She also received the ultimate accolade of a feature in “Time” Magazine, and was photographed by Lord Snowdon. To her surprise, in 1967 she received an award from the magazine “Dog’s Life” for her work. In answer to the inevitable question, why she did it? her invariable reply was that she preferred dogs to humans.



Her home at 218 London Road was just a few doors along from the former Lamb pub, near the present Meadows roundabout, but Is no longer standing. The Katherine Court retirement flats were named after her at the suggestion of a local resident in 2000.

There are so many great lessons we can learn from the life of Kate Ward, both as responsible dog owners, human beings, and as pet rescue charities. Most of all Kate recognized the value of a photograph and how it could be used for the positive influence of others, to bring light to a cause, and to help raise money.

Please share for others to enjoy.

The Best Dog Breeds For Mental Health Support

It’s been proven by science — dogs are good for your health.

The beneficial affects of dogs on people with depression has been well documented, and is it really any surprise?

Those furry, four-legged, tail-wagging dogs bring tons of joy into our lives, and for those coping with depression, the unconditional love of a dog can have tremendous power.

Dogs can help with anxiety, depression, PTSD, and many other mental health issues that affect your day-to-day life. Some dogs even provide emotional support as a full-time gig, working as service animals that are placed in schools, hospitals, nursing homes, and other locations.

While the advantages of dog ownership are huge, it’s worth asking – what are the best dogs for depression? You’ll want to find the right dog for you.

Picking the wrong dog for your lifestyle can increase stress and anxiety, so finding a dog that’s a good fit is essential for reaping the mood-boosting benefits of canine ownership.

In separate studies conducted by the “Journal of Psychiatric Research” and the “Journal of Applied Developmental Science,” researchers found that owning a dog not only made people suffering from mental health issues feel better, but it also made them more likely to help others. Additional research has shown that dog ownership also lowers blood pressure, elevates serotonin and dopamine in the brain, and even lowers triglycerides and cholesterol.

If you’re already a dog owner, some of these things may already be a given. You know what it means to have a dog and how it’s impacted your life. But if you’re still on the fence about dog ownership and are also experiencing mental health issues, dogs offer companionship and comfort, and can help ease loneliness, depression and anxiety. Check out or list of the best purebred and hybrid dog breeds to choose from if you need a loving best friend to brighten your day.

It’s also worth noting that you by no means need to get a purebred dog – make sure to consider adopting a rescue dog from a shelter.

These dogs tend to have boundless love to give, and are often especially appreciative of finding their new forever home. Mixed breed dogs, often found in shelters, can have the best of multiple breeds, so make sure to consider them for your canine companion!

The Best Dogs For Depression: Canines That Can Cure the Blues

The Cavalier King Charles spaniel is loving and gentle.
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

The Cavalier King Charles spaniel is on practically everyone’s list as a great support dog because of its rep as a “cuddlebug.” These super affectionate pups are true companion dogs and are quick to learn and eager to please.

Loving and gentle, the King Charles was a top dog in royal circles back in the day, but they don’t have the attitude of a monarch; they’re happy just to be in your presence, whether you’re on a long walk or snuggling on a couch. They are excellent companions for those with depression or PTSD.

Pugs have a certain grin that will make anyone smile.
Pug

The “clowns” of the dog world, pugs delight nearly everyone they come across with their human-like facial expressions and friendly, fun demeanor. Pugs are extremely sociable and make great emotional support animals for almost any affliction.

These small, charming companions are well mannered, even tempered and do especially well with children.

The standard poodle is obedient and clever.
Standard Poodle

These medium-sized, regal dogs are not just for show — they’re smart, obedient, easy to train and are valued as a wonderful mental health companion. Standard poodles are working dogs that love a good challenge, physical activity and that thrive in any environment.

They are friendly and do well around humans and animal companions alike, but their top priority is their compassion and responsibility toward their owner.

Labrador retrievers bring much-needed energy to someone struggling with mental health.
Labrador Retriever

The labrador retriever is an energetic, sturdy companion dog who lives up to the name “retriever” as that’s what he was bred to do — find things, carry them and ultimately drop them at the feet of his cherished human.

The lab is smart and obedient with a calm demeanor, which makes for a top-notch emotional support animal for any mental health issue. Those with ADD or autism often feel more grounded and settled in the presence of a loving lab.

Yorkies make the perfect lap dogs.
Yorkshire Terrier

You’ll see many Yorkies as service or support animals and there are several reasons as to why that is. Yorkies are small enough that they fall under most rental policies and they can be taken anywhere dogs are welcome, which, as the Psychiatric Service Dog Society claims, is vital to specific mental health issues.

Yorkies also rise to the occasion for lap duty, providing caregivers the opportunity to physically embrace them when needed. These tiny wonderdogs can also be taught myriad tasks, from pulling open cabinet doors to alerting their owners to specific sounds.

Border collies make loyal and friendly companions.
Border Collie

Breeds don’t come much smarter than this! The border collie is a devoted, friendly companion that is easily trainable, affectionate and a people pleaser. A herding dog by nature, the border collie will motivate and inspire you to get moving even when you don’t feel like it. 

This trait makes them an excellent dog for those who deal with depression. Additionally, if you suffer from anxiety, this calm, content canine will provide plenty of grounding and physical comfort.

This breed also makes an excellent guide dog.
Corgi

While their height makes them unsuited for some service dog jobs, Corgis were also bred for herding and make wonderful guide dogs. They have a strong instinct for picking up on their owners’ emotions and helping them accordingly. These energetic working dogs are smart, curious, eager and easy to train.

Corgis are also known for being aware of their surroundings at all times, which makes them perfect for people who need constant emotional support.

The vizsla will get its owner outside to enjoy the fresh air.
Vizsla

The vizsla is a lesser-known breed in the U.S. but is gaining popularity as a companion pet and emotional support animal. Bred for hunting, these Hungarian pointers are joyful and people-focused. Vizslas have a ton of energy and do need outdoor exercise, so if you’re not a person that gets out much, this may not be the dog for you.

Vizslas are intelligent, quick learners that carry out any task put before them, and their cheerful disposition makes them an excellent choice of support dog. Like pugs, vizslas bond with nearly everyone and do well in a home with children.

English bulldogs are low key and calm.
English Bulldog

The English bulldog is delightful emotional support companion that is perfect for apartment living and also for those who don’t spend much time exercising or doing other outdoor activities. They are kind, affectionate dogs that are low key and offer a sense of calm to whoever they come in contact with.

If you’re interested in a brachycephalic (short-nosed) breed as a companion animal, it’s best if you don’t travel by plane much. Many of them, particularly bulldogs, have been banned from flying as they can have breathing issues due to the change in air pressure.

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German Shephard

Germans shepherds have strong protective instincts, which can lead to aggression if they are not carefully trained. If you are interested in this breed, make sure you have the upper hand in your dynamic. Germans are smart, responsible and love a good challenge — all of which makes them highly trainable for a variety of jobs.

They are also herders by nature and tend to lead the way, which is good for someone who needs a little motivation. The breed’s size also lends itself to strength and physical support if needed.

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Golden Retriever

Goldens are one of the most popular breeds around overall and are considered one of the best mental health support dogs out there. They are energetic, loving and comforting to those who need it, and are super social with other animals and people.

These intelligent, gentle giants are loyal companions that are easy to train and are willing to perform nearly any task put before them.

The Lhasa apso is small but very intuitive.
Lhasa Apso

This little dog has a warm disposition and is excellent for those suffering from with PTSD, depression or bipolar disorder. They, too, are “mood readers” and are known to “nudge” their owners toward the right course of action in certain situations.

Lhasa apsos are easily trainable, highly demonstrative and are perfect for individuals in need of uplifting companionship.

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Collie

If you remember the television show “Lassie,” you’ll remember the Collie that comes to the rescue of her family in every episode. Collies are known to make great support dogs for many mental health ailments, including PTSD, as they are highly intuitive to human feelings. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and gentle, all of which are great qualities for an emotional support animal or psychiatric therapy dog.

Collies are also very protective of their families and have a large bark to prove it. The very act of petting a dog lowers stress hormones, and the Collie, with its soft and fluffy fur, seems to have been created just for this purpose.

Rotties are often misunderstood, but they are quite friendly and patient.
Rottweiler

Known for its strength and guarding abilities, the rottie also makes for a great mental health support companion. A breed must have a good disposition and temperament, and be friendly, patient and at ease in all situations to be a psychiatric or emotional therapy dog. Rotties indeed fit this bill.

While some people believe rotties to be vicious, that is not the case at all. They are lovable cuddlers who are fiercely loyal to their owners. You can lean on a rottie for help, both figuratively and literally.

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Chihuahua

The Chihuahua proves you don’t have to be big to be a loving, responsible support animal. These small dogs win big in intelligence and loyalty and are highly alert to verbal and visual cues and commands.

Like most smaller dogs, Chihuahuas can live or travel anywhere, and for those who have 24/7 emotional support and mental health needs, a Chihuahua will never need to leave your side. This breed can also live to 15 years old or longer.

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French Bulldog

Frenchies are cute, friendly clowns with happy dispositions who can tackle any mental health need from anxiety to depression, stress and emotional trauma. They are both a stress reliever and a shoulder to cry on for anyone needing a friend.

Frenchies are low maintenance, love people, are OK with being handled and have good manners. They are also especially loving toward kids. As with any brachycephalic breed, Frenchies don’t do well in hot weather — so be sure to keep them cool!

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Dachshund

This low-to-the-ground pup is one of the most adorable emotional support animals out there, but don’t let the breed’s diminutive size fool you — it packs a punch in beating back the blues. Dachshunds are born hunters with a keen sense of smell and are emotionally intuitive. They are friendly, loyal and do exceptionally well with kids.

You can also prepare to have this loyal breed around for the long haul because they live, on average, about 15 years, sometimes even up to 20 years.

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Borzoi

Borzois have such a keen intellect, independent streak and protection instinct — so much so that they are one of the chosen breeds of the non-profit Operation Wolfhound. The organization places dogs with vets suffering from PTSD.

Borzois can live to the ripe old age of 15, and are quiet, loyal and able to physically support a person if needed. They, like Irish wolfhounds, are gentle giants and enjoy spending time at their owner’s side. Remember, however, they need proper training and plenty of exercise to keep them well behaved and happy.

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Australian Labradoodle

This mixed breed is a popular mental and physical therapy dog. It can answer to several different mental health needs, depending on the dog’s personality.

Australian labradoodles are specifically bred for companionship and guidance. They have an even keel temperament and are loving and highly intelligent. Australians can “pick up” on human emotions and can answer your needs accordingly. They’re happy, love to play and will bring a smile to just about any face.

Do you have an emotional support pet, official or unofficial? How does your dog help you through the day? Share your experience in the comments!

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