First They Tortured Animals, Then They Turned To Humans!

Jeffrey Dahmer. Ted Bundy. David Berkowitz. Aside from killing dozens of innocent people (combined), these men—and significant percentage of other serial killers—have something else in common: Years before turning their rage on human beings, they practiced on animals.

TED BUNDY

According to the FBI, animal abuse is highly correlated with interpersonal, human-to-human violence. Serial killers often torture or kill small animals from an early age, and men who commit child abuse or domestic violence very frequently harm household pets as well. “If somebody is harming an animal, there is a good chance they’re also hurting a human,” said John Thompson, deputy executive director of the National Sheriff’s Association, in a 2016 interview.

A&E Real Crime spoke to Dr. Chris Hensley, associate professor of criminal justice at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, for some insight on why these two behaviors are linked—and what we can do about it.

Why do people hurt animals in the first place?
People who harm animals go after someone they perceive as weaker. Many serial killers feel a sense of rejection from their parents or from someone they love; there’s either a perceived rejection or a real rejection. Rather than going after the person who rejected them, they’ll start with something that’s weaker, and often that’s an animal. It’s a matter of power.

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN CRUELTY TO ANIMALS AND HUMAN VIOLENCE

At what point does it progress to human beings?
Some research suggests there’s ‘graduation’ hypothesis, where killers start with animals and move to human beings later—and it’s often someone they perceive to be weaker than they are: prostitutes, for example, or hitchhikers, or the elderly. Other people think that animal and human abuse starts at the same time, which is called ‘generalized deviance theory.’ That’s where a kid might hit another kid and then go home and smack their cat. I think it’s somewhere in the middle, a combination of both [theories].   Your research team asked prison inmates about their experience with animal abuse. What’s the most surprising thing you’ve found?
Finding out that there’s a powerful link between bestiality (sexual relations between a human and an animal) and later interpersonal violence. We don’t know why there’s a connection there—it’s a fairly new area of study and there’s not a lot of literature, but what we know is people who commit bestiality at a young age are significantly more likely to commit interpersonal crime than those who don’t.

[Bestiality] is still rare, of course, but of the people who have committed it, they’re significantly more likely to go on to hurt human beings. Also people that have a method of abusing animals—like strangulation—usually use that same method in hurting human beings. [Serial killer] Henry Lee Lucas, for example, slit the throats of his animal victims as he was sexually abusing them, and then eventually did that with women.

How common is animal abuse? What are some warning signs?
Most studies since 1980 have shown a link between childhood animal cruelty and adult interpersonal violence. We also know that it can be co-concurrent with child abuse or elder abuse. It’s very common in a domestic-violence situation, especially if it’s the victim’s animal.

We’ve seen multiple cases where you have someone engaging in domestic violence that ends up not only killing the person they’re abusing, but then they go back and kill the pets as well. I think it’s because the pet is an extension of [the victim].

In Chattanooga, if you’re in a domestic-violence situation, we have a family-justice center that will allow survivors to stay there and there’s an animal hospital nearby that will board your pets for free.

What else are states or law-enforcement officers doing to keep animals safe?
Tennessee actually became the first state to have a registry—you can go online and look at who in the state has been convicted of animal cruelty, similar to sex-offender registration. Depending on the amount of cruelty, that person is prevented from owning animals. Tennessee is the only state that currently has one, but I know that the FBI is also looking at developing a database as well.

What else could states be doing?
It’s taking a long time for states to really look at the impact that childhood animal cruelty has on later violence. A lot of states have dragged their feet in making animal cruelty a felony, and there are some states that don’t have any laws on the books related to bestiality at all.

Around 2002 and 2003 a lot of states got rid of sodomy statutes, and those states would usually have bestiality underneath that umbrella of sodomy. Those laws became nullified so states had to write their own laws for bestiality specifically, and some haven’t been quick about doing that.

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How can we prevent animal abuse before it progresses into interpersonal violence?

To me, treatment is key for children who engage in animal cruelty. Oftentimes parents or caregivers will say “boys will be boys” or turn a blind eye to things, instead of admitting something is really wrong with their child. Most parents know when their kids are engaging in this behavior.

We need to say that any form of animal cruelty, should be unacceptable – if you see your kids doing it, that’s a warning sign, and something has to be done. If you see animals being mistreated please report it to the police.

Original story by Sarah Watts in A & E, Real Life Crime.

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CHARITY APPEAL TO HELP BUILD THE FIRST CENTRE IN THE UK FOR DISABLED ANIMALS

As thousands of disabled animals are put to sleep across the UK, animal welfare charity Miracle’s Mission is looking for help to build the UK’s first centre for disabled animals – where they can be rehabilitated before finding their forever homes.

Victoria Bryceson, founder of Miracle’s Mission, says that countless disabled dogs are euthanased unnecessarily, despite the fact they could have a good quality of life with the right physical therapy and prosthetics.

She says, “At the moment amputation of one leg is common practice with UK vets, as dogs can live very well and still be very active with three legs, especially if it is a back leg, as most of the weight is on the front legs.

“However, when it comes to a double amputation leaving the dog with two legs, the general vets that I have seen in the UK have said it’s definitely not possible to do this as the dogs won’t be left with a good quality of life.”

As thousands of disabled animals are put to sleep across the UK, animal welfare charity Miracle’s Mission is looking for help to build the UK’s first centre for disabled animals – where they can be rehabilitated before finding their forever homes.

Many people may not be aware that dogs who have wheels and prosthetics can live as good a life as a fully able bodied dogs – much like Ella, who was found wandering the streets of Egypt, paralysed from the back down after being thrown off the top of a building.

Miracles’ Mission brought her to the UK, giving her a second chance. A wheelchair for dogs was made so she could get around, and soon Ella was running around with other dogs, living life to the fullest. Victoria is looking to let owners know that their disabled dogs could live happily, too, if only given a chance.

She adds, “The specialist hospitals seem more open to it as they have more experience in the area, but even they have problems where most of their dogs in these conditions are euthanased – not because they need to be but because, in their words, it is the owners of the dogs who can’t cope with the thought of a two legged dog. So there is a huge need for education in this area, amongst the public, dog owners and vets.

“General practice vets that have seen my journey with double amputee dogs have said that they have had a huge education on disabled animals and they can now see the possibilities and potential of a disabled dog. They are now much more open to using wheels and prosthetics. Dogs using wheels and prosthetics can live as good a life as a fully able-bodied dog and this is what I want to show people.

“I was stopped so many times when I was with a double amputee dog, to ask about her wheels as people hadn’t seen them before. They told me stories about their dogs back legs deteriorating and they thought the only option was euthanasia, but now they would look into wheels.”

The new centre will provide dedicated care for the most vulnerable dogs and cats. Animals under its care will receive thorough veterinary assessments, MRIs, surgeries, the fitting of prosthetics, and doggy wheels. Their personalised rehabilitation plan will include physiotherapy and hydrotherapy as well as daily massage and TENS machine stimulation.

Victoria says, “The animals coming into our care will initially all be stray dogs with nowhere else to go and no one else to help them. They will either have been born with some sort of condition, such as a bent leg that they can’t walk on or they will have been in an accident – for example hit by a car or they will have been abused.”

Once the patients have been emotionally and physically rehabilitated as much as possible, Miracle’s Mission get to work to find them all forever homes.

Victoria explains, “We will offer a full rehabilitation programme right through from assessment to surgery to rehabilitation, recovery and re-homing. This is again why education is so important, so that people become open to adopting disabled dogs.

“If we don’t re-home the dogs the centre will be full on day one and then we won’t be able to help anymore, so it is really desperately needed that the dogs be re-homed.”

There already is a waiting list of disabled dogs, but Victoria cannot accept them until she is able to finance the centre.  She is currently crowd funding to raise £20,000 to secure a deposit for the centre, which if secured will be built in Yorkshire in 2020.

If you’d like more information get in touch by writing to info@miraclesmission.org

Paul Christian, founder of Protect All Wildlife and Patron of Miracle’s Mission.

Images by Andrew Price

Please help Miracle’s Mission by donating ANY amount, large or small here.

The Story Of A Tragic Wolf Called ‘Romeo’ Who Loved Too Much And Deserved Much Better

ROMEO

On a twilit night in Juneau, Alaska, in December 2003, and Nick and Sherrie Jans were walking with Dakotah, their yellow Lab, in the Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area not far from their house. Suddenly, a young black wolf appeared on the ice—and began running in their direction. Awestruck but scared, the couple watched as Dakotah broke loose and charged the predator, which was twice the size of the dog. The animals stopped yards apart and gazed at each other “as if each were glimpsing an almost-forgotten face and trying to remember,” recalled Jans. After a few moments, Dakotah ran back to her owners, and the three hurried home, listening to the wolf howl

The locals named him Romeo, and soon his presence was noted by the entire town. Most found it fascinating that Romeo was so friendly, while others assumed that this naturally predatory animal would give into his natural instincts at any moment, potentially attacking their pets and children.

During this time Nick Jans started documenting Romeo. When he did, he uncovered an emotional story, the heart of which describes the tenuous relationships between wild animals and the humans around them.

“The first thing I saw was tracks out on the lake in front of our house on the outskirts of Juneau,” Jans said in an interview with National Geographic. “A few days later, I looked out from my house and there was this wolf out on the ice. I’d had 20 years of experience around wolves up in the Arctic and immediately knew it was a wolf, not a dog. I threw on my skis and found him.”

ROMEO

According to Jans, Romeo seemed totally relaxed and friendly.

And it wasn’t just one interaction, either: Romeo remained his curious, friendly self for the better part of six years.

“For want of a better word,” Jans said, “The only thing I can say from a human perspective is that it amounted to friendship. If you wanted to be scientifically correct, it would be “social mutual tolerance.” But it was more than that. The wolf would come trotting over to say hi, and give a little bow and a relaxed yawn, and go trotting after us when we went skiing. There was no survival benefit. He obviously just enjoyed our company.”

Romeo’s behavior was definitely unusual, as many wolves tend to assert dominance by attacking dogs and other animals.

he wolf got his name because Jans and his family noticed how Romeo was kind of a flirt — particularly with their “Juliet,” a dog named Dakotah. Here, they’re standing nose-to-nose in what seems to be an all-too-perfect photo moment.

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Romeo survived for years despite many mortal threats: scented traps, busy roads, illegal hunting, and even a poisoning attempt. He also had to contend with the natural dangers of starvation, injury, and attack by another pack of wolves. By almost any standard, his prolonged proximity to humans and dogs constituted incredibly rare behaviour. There was no obvious survival benefit to his socializing, yet the wolf lingered persistently, a late echo of the original process that must have initiated the domestication of dogs.

Romeo stayed in the area for as long as he lived — and he lived three times longer than most wild wolves do.

“Romeo was the single most transformative event of my life,” Jans said. “The amazing thing was Romeo’s understanding. It wasn’t just our understanding and tolerance. It was the combination of his and ours and the dogs’. We were these three species working out how to get along harmoniously. And we did.”

What happened to Romeo?                                                                                                   Romeo disappeared in late September 2009. After some sleuthing, a supporter found he had been shot and killed by Juneau resident Park Myers III and his Pennsylvanian friend Jeff Peacock. Both men were arrested and ended up paying fines, serving a few years on probation, and losing hunting and fishing privileges for a limited time. In late November 2010, a memorial service was held for Romeo and this plaque was laid along a path where he once roamed.

“Nothing can take away the miracle that was Romeo and the years we spent in his company,” writes Jans. “Love, not hate, is the burden we carry.”

Nick Jans’ beautiful account of his unusual relationship is now in a book called A Wolf Called Romeo.

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This Is Why You Should Never Ride On The Back Of An Elephant If You Are Travelling In Asia

Elephant rides are an attraction regularly offered to tourists in several Asian countries including Thailand. But to get there, the animals undergo a very particular training that is actually akin to real torture.

Between 35 and 40,000, is the number of wild Elephants that remain in Asia, according to estimates. A figure to which should be added the more than 15,000 domesticated Elephants. If you go to Asia one day, you will certainly meet these majestic pachyderms with big ears. You may even be asked to ride on their backs for a ride.

This attraction attracts millions of tourists every year in Asia, especially in Thailand. Nevertheless, it hides a reality that few tourists are aware of: to get there, the animals suffer a real torture. If the words can seem strong, they are not, as all those who have seen with their eyes what is really happening. Indeed, to be trained, Elephants undergo a ritual called “phajaan”.

The principle is simple: “break the spirit” of the Elephant. As two globetrotters, Seth and Lise, explain, “the origin of phajaan comes from the ancestral belief that one can separate the mind of an Elephant from its body so that it loses its reflexes and instinct natural wilderness and be completely under the control of man “. Concretely, it is to submit the Elephant until he agrees to do everything asked of him.

Beaten, hungry and sleep-deprived

From a practical point of view, it is only by using violence that the trainers achieve it. Phajaan lasts between 4 and 6 days and is carried out on young Elephants. The animals are separated from their mothers and locked in narrow cages where they are chained. Without being able to struggle or even move a limb, they are then repeatedly hit in strategic places, the most sensitive.

THE PHAJAAN

In addition to being beaten, Elephants are kept awake, deprived of food and water under the eyes of trainers (“mahout”) who recite prayers that can be translated as “Elephant, if you stop fighting, we do not you’ll hurt more, “says a documentary. The torture does not stop until after several days, when the trainers believe that the spirit of the Elephant is broken, that his behaviour has changed.

The Bullhook

Out of his cage, the animal appears submissive, impressed by the fear of the man who subjected him to this torture. Then begins a real training that will consist in teaching the Elephant all the necessary commands or gestures intended to amuse the tourists. Once the specimen is formed, it can be used as an attraction for most of its life.

50% of Elephants die during the ritual

It is estimated that half of the Elephants would not survive phajaan. Others would become aggressive: about 100 mahouts are killed each year by their animals. Still others would go insane or have trouble with their experience, rendering them unusable for attractions. Most would then be killed.

The surviving Elephants are used to wander among the tourists, to beg or for work. In order for them to remain submissive, they are given a few booster shots by hitting them or pressing the sensitive spots again. In tourism, an Elephant can spend the day carrying people without a minute to rest, eat or drink. The rest of the time, most animals are tied up so that they are not dangerous.

WHEN NOT BEING EXPLOITED BY TOURISTS THE ELEPHANTS ARE CHAINED

A life that would often lead to the appearance of disorders including neurological. “If you ever have a chance to spot domestic Elephants, watch them,” Seth and Lise explain. “Chance or not, all the Elephants we’ve seen had signs of recent abuse, scars, obvious signs of poor health, some are more damaged than others, and it’s extremely rare to see one of these well-treated animals. “.

“It is largely because of tourists that this business works, so it is up to tourists to make the right decisions. The future and especially the well-being of thousands of Elephants is at stake,” they conclude in their blog.

Seth & Lise: To Make Elephants Attractions In Thailand … What Is Hidden From Tourists? 

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MEET DERRICK CAMPANA, THE MAN WHO HAS HELPED THOUSANDS OF ANIMALS TO WALK AGAIN

DERRICK CAMPANA WITH MOSHA THE ELEPHANT

Derrick Campana is an animal orthotist who creates braces and artificial limbs to help increase animals’ mobility and improve their lives. Campana is one out of ten people in the world who make custom animal prosthetics, according to the Washington Business Journal. It’s amazing just how mobile animals with prosthetics can be, these few people are making a profound impact.

In 2004, Derrick founded the Animal Ortho Care in Sterling, Virginia, and since then, he has helped over 20,000 animals. The company sends out kits to pet owners and veterinarians so they can cast molds of their pets or patients. Then, they send back the casting kits, where Derrick crafts a personalized prosthetic, or brace, out of thermoplastic  material.

Since he started, his client base has grown dramatically. Now, he doesn’t only treat dogs or cats, he’s also making prosthetics for camels, horses, gazelles, sheep, birds, and elephants. “Now we’re seeing people caring about animals more, and we’re showing the world that things like dog prosthetics exist, and you can give your animals a second chance,” Campana proclaimed.

Receiving his undergraduate degree in Kinesiology/Biomechanics from Penn State University and Masters Degree in Orthotics and Prosthetics from Northwestern University, Derrick has pioneered the field of Veterinary Orthotics and Prosthetics (V-OP) into what it is today. Since that first dog, Derrick has treated nearly 20,000 furry patients with mobility devices. Derrick’s Goal is to help as many animals as he can while in his lifetime and even the playing field between animals and humans as far as treatment options available.

Currently, Derrick turns to medical grade plastic, foam, and sometimes even thermoplastic material for most of his projects. There is a specific reason that he chooses plastic for his efforts:

“These plastics enable him to craft and mold prostheses that contour to the shape of an animal’s body, while being sturdy enough to provide reliable support for many years. The plastics also help make prostheses more affordable, which is important to many pet owners without insurance to cover veterinarian care.”

One thing also noted is that sadly the need for veterinary doctors to help animals who require prosthetics is high, and there are roughly 200 animals a month that need his help.

“I’m always so excited about everything I do—from helping animals and developing new products to flying around the world and seeing different countries,” he says.

Campana considers seeing new parts of the world as a huge job perk, but he says the most rewarding part of his career will always be seeing animals walk again for the first time and watching their owners break down and cry.

“There’s never a dull moment,” he says. “It’s the best career in the world.” 

BABY ELEPHANT REFUSES TO LEAVE HIS INJURED FRIEND’S SIDE — NO MATTER WHAT!

This wild baby elephant refused to leave his injured friend’s side — no matter what.

Rangers were patrolling the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya spotted five elephants who’d been wounded by arrows. When the rangers gathered information from nearby communities, they learned what had happened — local farmers had shot the elephants after the herd ate some of their crops.

The rangers, who were from Olarro Conservancy, immediately got in touch with the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) and Mara Elephant Project (MEP), who, in turn, got in touch with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (DSWT). Then everyone worked together to get a mobile veterinary team to fly out and treat the elephants.

Before the team could help the injured elephants, they had to dart the animals with sedatives — and this had to be done by helicopter. When the team darted the first bull, the bull veered away from the herd, along with an older elephant and a baby.

“It was assumed from the air to be a mother and her calf accompanying the young bull,” Angela Sheldrick, CEO of DSWT, told The Dodo. “It was later confirmed by the ground teams to be two young bulls with the little calf.”

This wild baby elephant, who was about 18 months old, stayed close to the sedated elephant, who may have been the calf’s brother, although this couldn’t be confirmed. The calf’s mother wasn’t anywhere to be seen.

“The baby was very protective of the young bull and refused to leave his side to join the older elephant … once the young bull succumbed to the anesthetic,” Sheldrick said. “The youngster boldly remained by the side of the young bull throughout the operation.”

Being surrounded by humans was probably scary for the baby elephant, especially since it had been humans who injured his friend in the first place. But nothing deterred him from remaining by the bull’s side.

“This is not a tiny calf,” Sheldrick said. “At 18 months of age, he would still be very capable of knocking a grown man off his feet. He displayed no such aggression throughout proceedings, which is extraordinary behaviour for a wild elephant in a situation such as this. Normally one so young would run away, or charge around trumpeting, knocking into people.”

Yet the wild baby elephant remained calm and attentive throughout the ordeal, despite there being multiple people and vehicles driving in and out of the area, according to Sheldrick.

He showed concern and protectiveness, but elephants are such intelligent animals, and, somewhere, we feel sure he knew help was on hand,” Sheldrick added. “[This was] made all the more remarkable given the recent human-wildlife conflict and the injuries inflicted on this herd at the hands of humans. One would expect aggression and fear; this baby elephant knew the difference between the two situations as there was no panic.”

The vet team worked for two days to help the five injured elephants. Thankfully, none of their wounds were life-threatening, and the elephants were able to fully recover and rejoin their herd.

It was a very unusual day for all concerned, and those on the ground made clear how touched they were by the protective behavior of the youngster,” Sheldrick said. “Of course, attending to incidents like this, where elephants have been injured through no fault of their own … is always emotive for the teams. However, knowing you can make a difference is uplifting.”

All images: DSWT.

Story: The Dodo

Two-Legged Street Dog That Was Shot In The Head Lives To Tell The Tale And Now LOVES Life.

AMIRA WHEN SHE WAS RESCUED

A two-legged street dog from Thailand that was shot in the head and left to die has been rescued by a Canadian family – and now even has her own wheelchair. Lara Pleasence, 51, from Montreal, Canada, first heard about Amira’s tragic story through the Soi Dog Foundation, based in Asia. Administrator and personal trainer Lara first saw Amira in a video posted by the rescue centre in Thailand in October 2020. “This poor dog who was born without legs, lived on the streets having litter after litter, then after nine years of struggling to survive, someone shoots her in the head,” Lara told Jam Press. “I just broke down and cried.”

Amira was treated for her head wound by the Soi Dog rescue centre who shared regular updates of her progress on social media. “Sweet Amira was always wagging her tail; it just broke my heart that she still trusted humans even after everything she’d been through. “I knew I had to contact the rescue to see if I could help in any way, maybe even offer to be her forever family, although they doubted that she would ever be well enough to travel.” After a tense wait, the Soi Dog Foundation contacted Lara to tell her that Amira had recovered enough to be put up for adoption. “I was so stoked and so worried about what my husband was going to say, since we already had three dogs,” Lara admitted. “There was something about Amira, this incredible connection I felt for her from the very first time I saw her. “I wanted to right all the wrongs that were done to her, I just felt compelled to try. “I wanted desperately to show her all the love, security, happiness that she deserved, that every dog deserves, and that this poor sweetie had been denied for so many years.”

AMIRA’S LOVING AND LIVING LIFE TO THE FULL

To qualify to adopt Amira, Lara and her family had to go through a strict application procedure – including a virtual home visit, interview process and form-filling. “I was made aware that we would have to pay for her to be flown to Canada since, because of Covid, they didn’t have travellers who could take her on the plane for free.” “I think I would have mortgaged the house to get this sweet girl here.” When Amira touched down in Montreal in April 2021 after a 22-hour journey – which cost $2,000 – it was love at first sight. Lara said: “My husband was none too happy about even the idea of another dog since we already had three, but I told him that I had never felt this way about any rescues that I had seen. “I was so excited that we were getting her, I was practically bursting, and he knew that fighting it was a lost cause – happy wife, happy life.” Amira came with her wheelchair, after a man in Vietnam made a custom one for her and it was gifted to the pup by Soi Dog. “She literally came bouncing out of her crate and jumped all over us like the happiest kangaroo you’ve ever seen.” “She’d been in it for over 22 hours and didn’t even have an accident!” “We couldn’t believe the joy she exudes.

She is a true miracle. After everything she’s been through, Amira is fun-loving and outgoing. “She’s so trusting, she loves everyone she meets. “She absolutely loves to be held in your lap and will sleep there for as long as you will let her. “She is resilient and doesn’t let her past hold her back from trying new things or doing something a bit scary like canoeing or going on our paddleboard. “She is obsessed with our bed… If we’re not home, we have to block the stairs because we can’t risk her falling. “How a street dog, with no front legs, knows how to climb stairs is just one of Amira’s many mysteries. “She’ll let me kiss her nose 50 times in a row, my other three dogs will eventually pull their head away, but not Miss Amira, she loves it. “She gets these crazy puppy moments where she runs around on her nubs and jumps up on the furniture then flies right back off it. “These moments make my heart smile because it’s like she finally doesn’t have a care in the world and can just be a dog. “No more struggling for food or to keep her puppies safe and fed or hiding from bad people.”

AMIRA IN HER WHEELS

Now, Amira enjoys a happy life spending her days with her family and playing at her favourite spot. Lara added: “She loves going to the dog park, even though many of the dogs get freaked out by the “transformer dog” with wheels and just bark at her.”

FROM STREET DOG TO CRUISING THE STREETS

In videos posted to Instagram (@amira.amiracle), Lara shares Amira’s adventures with her new set of wheels. In one comical clip, which has been viewed over 725,000 times, Amira runs after a cat and ends up doing a headstand when she hits a curb. “She just waits for me to pick her back up and she keeps on going like it’s no big deal,” said Lara. Another video shows her gradually getting better at walking in a straight line with her wheels. Followers of Amira’s page are in love with the pup, and she regularly receives gushing comments. One person commented: “So beautiful to see this! You’re amazing, sweet and strong Amira.” “Love u Amira very much,” said another viewer. “She’s amazing and you’re amazing with her,” added another person. Lara is grateful for all the support and says she is touched by the comments she receives. “The people who follow Amira on Instagram are the sweetest,” she said. “They are so happy that she has a family that loves her now. “Some say Amira’s posts are their daily dose of ‘good feels’ or that her videos are ‘good for the soul’. “People feel they need to thank me for taking her, which is so kind, but I always tell them that it is my privilege to give her the best life that I possibly can,” “It’s the least I can do for such an angel. “I can only hope that her page may inspire someone else to help a special needs dog or donate to an organisation like Soi Dog Foundation so they can continue their amazing work.”

Man Pushes His Beloved Dying Dog Up Pen Y Fan In A Wheelbarrow For ‘One Last Adventure’ Together

A dog owner whose pet dog was dying from leukaemia pushed him to the top of Pen y Fan in a wheelbarrow for “one final adventure together”.Carlos Fresco, a hotelier from London, had owned 10-year-old Monty since he was a puppy and the pair had always loved going on long walks together all around the UK.But, after the Labradoodle fell ill 18-months ago, he realised they only had a certain amount of time left and knew exactly what he had to do.

“At first Monty responded well to the chemotherapy, but sadly the leukaemia returned several weeks ago and he started fading fast,” said the 57-year-old.

“Then, at the end of last month, a mate of mine who lives in Brecon detached the retina in his eye and needed to get home from London. So I offered to drive him and took Monty with us. “We ended up staying there for a week and Monty loved having a big beautiful back garden to stretch out in – which is where I stumbled across a rusty old wheelbarrow which I decided to dust off and oil up.

“The next day I put Monty in it on top of a load of blankets and started wheeling him to the top of Pen y Fan. He loved it and the reaction he got from other walkers was amazing. They all took turns in helping to push the barrow, and Monty really enjoyed that because he’d always adored people and being made a fuss of.

“I was bowled over by the kindness we were shown, to be honest – total strangers taking the time out to say ‘hello’ and lend a hand in getting him to the summit. “However, Monty’s health continued to decline during their stay in Brecon and he finally passed away at the foot of Carlos’ bed a few days later.

“He hung on until the morning after Father’s Day – I peered over the mattress and he’d gone,” Carlos said. “He looked so peaceful though and I’m glad we got to go on one last adventure together. “He was a lovely little lad.”

REST IN PEACE MONTY

CHARITY AUCTION TO HELP DISABLED ANIMALS

This is your chance to bid on beautiful original artworks and signed memorabilia in our ‘Charity Auction To Help Disabled Animals’.

This is a sealed bid auction, so all you need to do is decide which item you would like to bid for – noting the reserve price for each – and send us your bid with the lot number and name by email to protectallwildlife@btinternet.com by 21:00 on the 17th of April . We will email you to let you know if your bid is the highest. Postage costs will be calculated when the auction ends. Good luck!

All funds raised help support the Miracle’s Mission Centre for Disabled Animals and their work in the rescue, treatment and rehoming of sick, injured and disabled animals .

Happy bidding and good luck 🐾.

Lot 1

This signed After Life image has been very kindly donated by animal welfare great Ricky Gervais.

Reserve £100

RICKY GERVAIS AFTER LIFE 1

Lot 2

This signed After Life image has been very kindly donated by animal welfare great Ricky Gervais.

Reserve £100

RICKY GERVAIS AFTER LIFE 2

Lot 3

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Badger by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 54 x 41 cms

Reserve: £100

Lot 4

This is an ORIGINAL pencil study of a Rhino by Dane Youkers . This STUNNING piece measures 28 x 36 cms .

Reserve: £100

RHINO

Lot 5

‘The Animals Fight Back’ original watercolour by Charito Lilley. This thought-provoking piece measures 40 x 30 cms

Reserve: £50

THE ANIMALS FIGHT BACK

Lot 6

‘Tails Erect’ by Wildlife Artist Carol Barrett. This ORIGINAL study of Warthogs is in watercolour and ink and is on Rhino Dung Paper! It is mounted and measures 40 x 30 cms.

Reserve: £200

TAILS ERECT

Lot 7

A ‘Dazzle Of Zebras’ by Jan Ferguson. This stunning print measures 41 x 30 cms

Reserve: £30

A DAZZLE OF ZEBRAS

Lot 8

Limited Edition print titled ‘Highland Monarch’ Michael Demain. This stunning measures 56 x 34 cms.

Reserve: £40

HIGHLAND MONARCH

Lot 9

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Cheetah by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 57 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £100

CHEETAH

Lot 10

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Fox by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 58 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £100

FOX

Lot 11

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Clouded Leopard by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 57 x 42 cms

Reserve: £100

CLOUDED LEOPARD

Lot 12

A beautiful print of Tiger cubs by Jan Ferguson. This piece measures 41 x 31 cms.

Reserve: £30

TIGER CUBS

Lot 13

This lot is for an official Scottish Rugby ball signed by the 2021/2022 squad.

Reserve: £75

OFFICIAL SIGNED SCOTTISH RUGBY BALL 2021/2022 SQUAD

Lot 14

This is a stunning ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Jaguar by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 57 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £100

JAGUAR

Lot 15

This is a stunning ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a pair of baby Snow Leopards by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 59 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £100

A PAIR OF BABY SNOW LEOPARDS

Lot 16

This is a stunning ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Snow Leopard by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 59 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £100

SNOW LEOPARD

Lot 17

A stunning Limited Edition print titled ‘Endangered Nobility’ by Kim Thompson. This beautiful study of the noble Lion measures 60 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £75

ENDANGERED NOBILITY

Lot 18

‘Mischief Maker’ is a beautiful Ltd Edition study of a Lion cub by Julie Rhodes. It is mounted and measures 560 x 380mm.

Reserve: £50

MISCHIEF MAKER

Lot 19

The beautiful Butterflies In The Round by Cath Hodsman. This Limited Print measures 51 x 41 cms.

Reserve: £50

BUTTERFLIES IN THE ROUND

Lot 20

This lot is ‘A Mother’s Love’, an adorable original watercolour, pastel and pencil of a Lioness and her cubs by wildlife artist Milo. This beautiful piece measures 30 x 28 cms.

Reserve: £75

A MOTHER’S LOVE

Lot 21

Who can resist ‘Those Eyes’? This delightful original watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a baby Orangutan is by Milo and measures 59 x 42 cms.

Reserve: £100

ORANGUTAN

Lot 22

A custom made digital pet portraits makes a wonderful keepsake or present for your loved ones and are ideal for framing.

Reserve: £25

DIGITAL PET PORTRAIT

Thank you for taking the time to look at our auction and happy bidding.

If you would like to make a donation to our fundraiser to help support our work you can do so at Fundraiser To Help Disabled Animals. Thank you.

CHARITY AUCTION TO HELP DISABLED ANIMALS

Our wonderful supporters and friends have donated a number of amazing items featured below that you can bid for as part our ‘Charity Auction To Help Disabled Animals’.

This is a sealed bid auction, so all you need to do is decide which item you would like to bid for – noting the reserve price for each – and send us your bid with the lot number by email to protectallwildlife@btinternet.com by 21:00 on the 28th of february.  We’ll email you to let you know if your bid is the highest. Postage costs will be calculated when the auction ends. Good luck!

All funds support the Miracle’s Mission Centre for Disabled Animals and their work in the rescue, treatment and rehoming of sick, injured and disabled animals

LOT 1

Street artist Sonny Sundancer’s gigantic painting of an Amur Leopard overlooked the city of Vladivostok, Russia and is part of his worldwide ‘To The Bone’ project aimed at raising awareness about endangered species.

This STUNNING piece of his work is caught brilliantly in this VERY Limited Edition of only 45 prints and measures 500 x 355mm.

Reserve: £75

LOT 2

This study of a Lion is titled ‘Endangered Nobility’ and is a stunning ORIGINAL pencil drawing by Kim Thompson. It measures 375 x 470mm.

Reserve: £250

LOT 3

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Siberian Tiger by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 420 x 570mm.

Reserve: £100

LOT 4

Two Day tickets to the Yorkshire Wildlife Park where you can see, amongst others, the pride of rescued Romanian Lions.

Reserve: £50

LOT 5

An original stunning watercolour by Diane Antone titled ‘The Badger’. It measures 210 x 297mm.

Reserve: £75

LOT 6

This is a stunning ORIGINAL watercolour study of a Lion by wildlife artist William Elliston.  This superb piece measures 420 x 300mm.

Reserve: £75

LOT 7

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of an Amur Leopard by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410 x 530mm.

Reserve: £100

LOT 8

This is a signed plaque of Paralympic swimmer Stephanie Millward MBE who is one of the most experienced para-swimmers on the British team having won a total of ten medals, including two golds, across three games.

The plaque measures 300 x 210 x 5mm and would superb framed.

Reserve: £50

LOT 9

This STUNNING Ltd Edition print is titled ‘Highland Monarch’ and is by Michael Demain.  It is measures 555 x 335mm

Reserve: £40

LOT 10

This ORIGINAL watercolour of a Stag by I Mills is stunning. It measures 280 x 380mm

Reserve: £50

LOT 11

‘Mischief Maker’ is a beautiful Ltd Edition study of a Lion cub by Julie Rhodes. It is mounted and measures 560 x 380mm.

Reserve £50

LOT 12

‘Lekupania with Giraffe’ by multi-award winning photojournalist and documentary filmmaker Ami Vitalle. This stunning image is of an orphaned baby reticulated giraffe embracing Sarara Camp wildlife keeper Lekupania. It measures 11 x 16 inches and normally sells for $550 on Ami’s website.

Reserve: £250

LOT 13

‘Tails Erect’ by Wildlife Artist Carol Barrett. This ORIGINAL study of Warthogs is in watercolour and ink and is on Rhino Dung Paper! It is mounted and measures 400 x 300 mm.

Reserve: £200

LOT 14

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Giraffe and her calf by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 420mm x 300mm.

Reserve £100

LOT 15

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Badger by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 590mm x 420mm

Reserve £100

LOT 16

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of Zebras At A Waterhole by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 560mm x 420mm.

Reserve £100

LOT 17

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Sleeping Chimp by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410mm x 530mm.

Reserve £100

If you would like to make a donation to our fundraiser you can do so at Fundraiser To Help Disabled Animals