MEET DERRICK CAMPANA, THE MAN WHO HAS HELPED THOUSANDS OF ANIMALS TO WALK AGAIN

DERRICK CAMPANA WITH MOSHA THE ELEPHANT

Derrick Campana is an animal orthotist who creates braces and artificial limbs to help increase animals’ mobility and improve their lives. Campana is one out of ten people in the world who make custom animal prosthetics, according to the Washington Business Journal. It’s amazing just how mobile animals with prosthetics can be, these few people are making a profound impact.

In 2004, Derrick founded the Animal Ortho Care in Sterling, Virginia, and since then, he has helped over 20,000 animals. The company sends out kits to pet owners and veterinarians so they can cast molds of their pets or patients. Then, they send back the casting kits, where Derrick crafts a personalized prosthetic, or brace, out of thermoplastic  material.

Since he started, his client base has grown dramatically. Now, he doesn’t only treat dogs or cats, he’s also making prosthetics for camels, horses, gazelles, sheep, birds, and elephants. “Now we’re seeing people caring about animals more, and we’re showing the world that things like dog prosthetics exist, and you can give your animals a second chance,” Campana proclaimed.

Receiving his undergraduate degree in Kinesiology/Biomechanics from Penn State University and Masters Degree in Orthotics and Prosthetics from Northwestern University, Derrick has pioneered the field of Veterinary Orthotics and Prosthetics (V-OP) into what it is today. Since that first dog, Derrick has treated nearly 20,000 furry patients with mobility devices. Derrick’s Goal is to help as many animals as he can while in his lifetime and even the playing field between animals and humans as far as treatment options available.

Currently, Derrick turns to medical grade plastic, foam, and sometimes even thermoplastic material for most of his projects. There is a specific reason that he chooses plastic for his efforts:

“These plastics enable him to craft and mold prostheses that contour to the shape of an animal’s body, while being sturdy enough to provide reliable support for many years. The plastics also help make prostheses more affordable, which is important to many pet owners without insurance to cover veterinarian care.”

One thing also noted is that sadly the need for veterinary doctors to help animals who require prosthetics is high, and there are roughly 200 animals a month that need his help.

“I’m always so excited about everything I do—from helping animals and developing new products to flying around the world and seeing different countries,” he says.

Campana considers seeing new parts of the world as a huge job perk, but he says the most rewarding part of his career will always be seeing animals walk again for the first time and watching their owners break down and cry.

“There’s never a dull moment,” he says. “It’s the best career in the world.” 

BABY ELEPHANT REFUSES TO LEAVE HIS INJURED FRIEND’S SIDE — NO MATTER WHAT!

This wild baby elephant refused to leave his injured friend’s side — no matter what.

Rangers were patrolling the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya spotted five elephants who’d been wounded by arrows. When the rangers gathered information from nearby communities, they learned what had happened — local farmers had shot the elephants after the herd ate some of their crops.

The rangers, who were from Olarro Conservancy, immediately got in touch with the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) and Mara Elephant Project (MEP), who, in turn, got in touch with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (DSWT). Then everyone worked together to get a mobile veterinary team to fly out and treat the elephants.

Before the team could help the injured elephants, they had to dart the animals with sedatives — and this had to be done by helicopter. When the team darted the first bull, the bull veered away from the herd, along with an older elephant and a baby.

“It was assumed from the air to be a mother and her calf accompanying the young bull,” Angela Sheldrick, CEO of DSWT, told The Dodo. “It was later confirmed by the ground teams to be two young bulls with the little calf.”

This wild baby elephant, who was about 18 months old, stayed close to the sedated elephant, who may have been the calf’s brother, although this couldn’t be confirmed. The calf’s mother wasn’t anywhere to be seen.

“The baby was very protective of the young bull and refused to leave his side to join the older elephant … once the young bull succumbed to the anesthetic,” Sheldrick said. “The youngster boldly remained by the side of the young bull throughout the operation.”

Being surrounded by humans was probably scary for the baby elephant, especially since it had been humans who injured his friend in the first place. But nothing deterred him from remaining by the bull’s side.

“This is not a tiny calf,” Sheldrick said. “At 18 months of age, he would still be very capable of knocking a grown man off his feet. He displayed no such aggression throughout proceedings, which is extraordinary behaviour for a wild elephant in a situation such as this. Normally one so young would run away, or charge around trumpeting, knocking into people.”

Yet the wild baby elephant remained calm and attentive throughout the ordeal, despite there being multiple people and vehicles driving in and out of the area, according to Sheldrick.

He showed concern and protectiveness, but elephants are such intelligent animals, and, somewhere, we feel sure he knew help was on hand,” Sheldrick added. “[This was] made all the more remarkable given the recent human-wildlife conflict and the injuries inflicted on this herd at the hands of humans. One would expect aggression and fear; this baby elephant knew the difference between the two situations as there was no panic.”

The vet team worked for two days to help the five injured elephants. Thankfully, none of their wounds were life-threatening, and the elephants were able to fully recover and rejoin their herd.

It was a very unusual day for all concerned, and those on the ground made clear how touched they were by the protective behavior of the youngster,” Sheldrick said. “Of course, attending to incidents like this, where elephants have been injured through no fault of their own … is always emotive for the teams. However, knowing you can make a difference is uplifting.”

All images: DSWT.

Story: The Dodo

Two-Legged Street Dog That Was Shot In The Head Lives To Tell The Tale And Now LOVES Life.

AMIRA WHEN SHE WAS RESCUED

A two-legged street dog from Thailand that was shot in the head and left to die has been rescued by a Canadian family – and now even has her own wheelchair. Lara Pleasence, 51, from Montreal, Canada, first heard about Amira’s tragic story through the Soi Dog Foundation, based in Asia. Administrator and personal trainer Lara first saw Amira in a video posted by the rescue centre in Thailand in October 2020. “This poor dog who was born without legs, lived on the streets having litter after litter, then after nine years of struggling to survive, someone shoots her in the head,” Lara told Jam Press. “I just broke down and cried.”

Amira was treated for her head wound by the Soi Dog rescue centre who shared regular updates of her progress on social media. “Sweet Amira was always wagging her tail; it just broke my heart that she still trusted humans even after everything she’d been through. “I knew I had to contact the rescue to see if I could help in any way, maybe even offer to be her forever family, although they doubted that she would ever be well enough to travel.” After a tense wait, the Soi Dog Foundation contacted Lara to tell her that Amira had recovered enough to be put up for adoption. “I was so stoked and so worried about what my husband was going to say, since we already had three dogs,” Lara admitted. “There was something about Amira, this incredible connection I felt for her from the very first time I saw her. “I wanted to right all the wrongs that were done to her, I just felt compelled to try. “I wanted desperately to show her all the love, security, happiness that she deserved, that every dog deserves, and that this poor sweetie had been denied for so many years.”

AMIRA’S LOVING AND LIVING LIFE TO THE FULL

To qualify to adopt Amira, Lara and her family had to go through a strict application procedure – including a virtual home visit, interview process and form-filling. “I was made aware that we would have to pay for her to be flown to Canada since, because of Covid, they didn’t have travellers who could take her on the plane for free.” “I think I would have mortgaged the house to get this sweet girl here.” When Amira touched down in Montreal in April 2021 after a 22-hour journey – which cost $2,000 – it was love at first sight. Lara said: “My husband was none too happy about even the idea of another dog since we already had three, but I told him that I had never felt this way about any rescues that I had seen. “I was so excited that we were getting her, I was practically bursting, and he knew that fighting it was a lost cause – happy wife, happy life.” Amira came with her wheelchair, after a man in Vietnam made a custom one for her and it was gifted to the pup by Soi Dog. “She literally came bouncing out of her crate and jumped all over us like the happiest kangaroo you’ve ever seen.” “She’d been in it for over 22 hours and didn’t even have an accident!” “We couldn’t believe the joy she exudes.

She is a true miracle. After everything she’s been through, Amira is fun-loving and outgoing. “She’s so trusting, she loves everyone she meets. “She absolutely loves to be held in your lap and will sleep there for as long as you will let her. “She is resilient and doesn’t let her past hold her back from trying new things or doing something a bit scary like canoeing or going on our paddleboard. “She is obsessed with our bed… If we’re not home, we have to block the stairs because we can’t risk her falling. “How a street dog, with no front legs, knows how to climb stairs is just one of Amira’s many mysteries. “She’ll let me kiss her nose 50 times in a row, my other three dogs will eventually pull their head away, but not Miss Amira, she loves it. “She gets these crazy puppy moments where she runs around on her nubs and jumps up on the furniture then flies right back off it. “These moments make my heart smile because it’s like she finally doesn’t have a care in the world and can just be a dog. “No more struggling for food or to keep her puppies safe and fed or hiding from bad people.”

AMIRA IN HER WHEELS

Now, Amira enjoys a happy life spending her days with her family and playing at her favourite spot. Lara added: “She loves going to the dog park, even though many of the dogs get freaked out by the “transformer dog” with wheels and just bark at her.”

FROM STREET DOG TO CRUISING THE STREETS

In videos posted to Instagram (@amira.amiracle), Lara shares Amira’s adventures with her new set of wheels. In one comical clip, which has been viewed over 725,000 times, Amira runs after a cat and ends up doing a headstand when she hits a curb. “She just waits for me to pick her back up and she keeps on going like it’s no big deal,” said Lara. Another video shows her gradually getting better at walking in a straight line with her wheels. Followers of Amira’s page are in love with the pup, and she regularly receives gushing comments. One person commented: “So beautiful to see this! You’re amazing, sweet and strong Amira.” “Love u Amira very much,” said another viewer. “She’s amazing and you’re amazing with her,” added another person. Lara is grateful for all the support and says she is touched by the comments she receives. “The people who follow Amira on Instagram are the sweetest,” she said. “They are so happy that she has a family that loves her now. “Some say Amira’s posts are their daily dose of ‘good feels’ or that her videos are ‘good for the soul’. “People feel they need to thank me for taking her, which is so kind, but I always tell them that it is my privilege to give her the best life that I possibly can,” “It’s the least I can do for such an angel. “I can only hope that her page may inspire someone else to help a special needs dog or donate to an organisation like Soi Dog Foundation so they can continue their amazing work.”

Man Pushes His Beloved Dying Dog Up Pen Y Fan In A Wheelbarrow For ‘One Last Adventure’ Together

A dog owner whose pet dog was dying from leukaemia pushed him to the top of Pen y Fan in a wheelbarrow for “one final adventure together”.Carlos Fresco, a hotelier from London, had owned 10-year-old Monty since he was a puppy and the pair had always loved going on long walks together all around the UK.But, after the Labradoodle fell ill 18-months ago, he realised they only had a certain amount of time left and knew exactly what he had to do.

“At first Monty responded well to the chemotherapy, but sadly the leukaemia returned several weeks ago and he started fading fast,” said the 57-year-old.

“Then, at the end of last month, a mate of mine who lives in Brecon detached the retina in his eye and needed to get home from London. So I offered to drive him and took Monty with us. “We ended up staying there for a week and Monty loved having a big beautiful back garden to stretch out in – which is where I stumbled across a rusty old wheelbarrow which I decided to dust off and oil up.

“The next day I put Monty in it on top of a load of blankets and started wheeling him to the top of Pen y Fan. He loved it and the reaction he got from other walkers was amazing. They all took turns in helping to push the barrow, and Monty really enjoyed that because he’d always adored people and being made a fuss of.

“I was bowled over by the kindness we were shown, to be honest – total strangers taking the time out to say ‘hello’ and lend a hand in getting him to the summit. “However, Monty’s health continued to decline during their stay in Brecon and he finally passed away at the foot of Carlos’ bed a few days later.

“He hung on until the morning after Father’s Day – I peered over the mattress and he’d gone,” Carlos said. “He looked so peaceful though and I’m glad we got to go on one last adventure together. “He was a lovely little lad.”

REST IN PEACE MONTY

CHARITY AUCTION TO HELP DISABLED ANIMALS

Our wonderful supporters and friends have donated a number of amazing items featured below that you can bid for as part our ‘Charity Auction To Help Disabled Animals’.

This is a sealed bid auction, so all you need to do is decide which item you would like to bid for – noting the reserve price for each – and send us your bid with the lot number by email to protectallwildlife@btinternet.com by 21:00 on the 28th of february.  We’ll email you to let you know if your bid is the highest. Postage costs will be calculated when the auction ends. Good luck!

All funds support the Miracle’s Mission Centre for Disabled Animals and their work in the rescue, treatment and rehoming of sick, injured and disabled animals

LOT 1

Street artist Sonny Sundancer’s gigantic painting of an Amur Leopard overlooked the city of Vladivostok, Russia and is part of his worldwide ‘To The Bone’ project aimed at raising awareness about endangered species.

This STUNNING piece of his work is caught brilliantly in this VERY Limited Edition of only 45 prints and measures 500 x 355mm.

Reserve: £75

LOT 2

This study of a Lion is titled ‘Endangered Nobility’ and is a stunning ORIGINAL pencil drawing by Kim Thompson. It measures 375 x 470mm.

Reserve: £250

LOT 3

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Siberian Tiger by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 420 x 570mm.

Reserve: £100

LOT 4

Two Day tickets to the Yorkshire Wildlife Park where you can see, amongst others, the pride of rescued Romanian Lions.

Reserve: £50

LOT 5

An original stunning watercolour by Diane Antone titled ‘The Badger’. It measures 210 x 297mm.

Reserve: £75

LOT 6

This is a stunning ORIGINAL watercolour study of a Lion by wildlife artist William Elliston.  This superb piece measures 420 x 300mm.

Reserve: £75

LOT 7

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of an Amur Leopard by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410 x 530mm.

Reserve: £100

LOT 8

This is a signed plaque of Paralympic swimmer Stephanie Millward MBE who is one of the most experienced para-swimmers on the British team having won a total of ten medals, including two golds, across three games.

The plaque measures 300 x 210 x 5mm and would superb framed.

Reserve: £50

LOT 9

This STUNNING Ltd Edition print is titled ‘Highland Monarch’ and is by Michael Demain.  It is measures 555 x 335mm

Reserve: £40

LOT 10

This ORIGINAL watercolour of a Stag by I Mills is stunning. It measures 280 x 380mm

Reserve: £50

LOT 11

‘Mischief Maker’ is a beautiful Ltd Edition study of a Lion cub by Julie Rhodes. It is mounted and measures 560 x 380mm.

Reserve £50

LOT 12

‘Lekupania with Giraffe’ by multi-award winning photojournalist and documentary filmmaker Ami Vitalle. This stunning image is of an orphaned baby reticulated giraffe embracing Sarara Camp wildlife keeper Lekupania. It measures 11 x 16 inches and normally sells for $550 on Ami’s website.

Reserve: £250

LOT 13

‘Tails Erect’ by Wildlife Artist Carol Barrett. This ORIGINAL study of Warthogs is in watercolour and ink and is on Rhino Dung Paper! It is mounted and measures 400 x 300 mm.

Reserve: £200

LOT 14

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Giraffe and her calf by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 420mm x 300mm.

Reserve £100

LOT 15

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Badger by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 590mm x 420mm

Reserve £100

LOT 16

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of Zebras At A Waterhole by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 560mm x 420mm.

Reserve £100

LOT 17

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Sleeping Chimp by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410mm x 530mm.

Reserve £100

If you would like to make a donation to our fundraiser you can do so at Fundraiser To Help Disabled Animals

THE LIMBE WILDLIFE CENTRE URGENTLY NEEDS HELP TO SECURE THE FUTURE FOR CAMEROON’S WILDLIFE

SECURING A FUTURE FOR CAMEROON’S WILDLIFE

The Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC) is a conservation education centre in Limbe, Cameroon. Above all, they provide a solution to law enforcement agencies for where to place wildlife seized from the illegal wildlife trade. For all elements of their work, they collaborate with state and national government, communities, and other international and local NGOs to protect habitats and endangered species. In brief, they  in-situ and ex-situ activities that include rescue, rehabilitation and reintroduction, conservation education and advocacy, law reinforcement, creating alternative livelihoods to hunting, and research. Through a holistic approach, the LWC aims to ensure the survival of Cameroon’s unique flora and fauna.

Ultimately, there are three main pillars to our work: rescue and rehabilitation, education and community.

The Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC) is being hit hard by the current Covid-19 pandemic. With no volunteers or visitors coming to the centre, they have lost an important source of income, and much of their grant funding has been cut due to the global economic downturn. With travel and business restrictions happening across Cameroon, like in many other countries, they are struggling to obtain the food and medication needed every day for their rescued wildlife.

At this difficult time, they urgently need your helpThey are dependent on your kindness to continue providing daily essential care to the more than 450 animals currently in their care.

Protect All Wildlife are supporting LWC continue their amazing work by selling these unique Ltd Edition tops to raise funds.

Please help @LimbeWildlife rescue, rehabilitate & release primates & other animals orphaned by the illegal bush meat and pet trades. These beautiful Ltd Edition tops are available in a variety styles & colours at https://teezily.com/stores/limbe-wildlife-centre…. All profits help this wonderful charity.

CHARITY AUCTION TO HELP DISABLED ANIMALS

Our wonderful supporters and friends have donated a number of amazing items featured below that you can bid for as part our ‘Charity Auction To Help Disabled Animals’.

This is a sealed bid auction, so all you need to do is decide which item you would like to bid for – noting the reserve price for each – and send us your offer with the bid number by email to protectallwildlife@btinternet.com by 21:00 on the 30th of November.  We’ll email you to let you know if your bid is the highest. Postage costs will be calculated when the auction ends. Good luck!

All funds support the Miracle’s Mission Centre for Disabled Animals and their work in the rescue, treatment and rehoming of sick, injured and disabled animals

LOT 1

Street artist Sonny Sundancer’s gigantic painting of an Amur Leopard overlooked the city of Vladivostok, Russia and is part of his worldwide ‘To The Bone’ project aimed at raising awareness about endangered species.

This STUNNING piece of his work is caught brilliantly in this VERY Limited Edition of only 45 prints and measures 500 x 355mm.

Reserve: £75 Current Bid:

LOT 2

This study of a Lion is titled ‘Endangered Nobility’ and is a stunning ORIGINAL pencil drawing by Kim Thompson. It measures 375 x 470mm.

Reserve: £250 Current Bid:

LOT 3

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of a Tiger by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410 x 540mm.

Reserve: £100 Current Bid: £350 Donna Earrey

LOT 4

Elephant Gin, Wildlife Warrior – Limited Art Edition Set. In collaboration with renowned wildlife artist Martin Aveling, we are supporting Big Life Foundation’s ‘Wildlife Warrior’ programme with a special limited edition of 5,000 bottles. The “Wildlife Warrior” Elephant London Dry Gin (45%) bottles are adorned with Aveling’s “Kichwa Tembo” artwork and packed in an elegant gift box, accompanied with an exclusive A5 art print.

Reserve: £40 Current Bid: £50 Laker Allison

LOT 5

Two Day tickets to the Yorkshire Wildlife Park where you can see, amongst others, the pride of rescued Romanian Lions.

Reserve: £50 Current Bid:

LOT 6

This ORIGINAL watercolour by Eddie Kagimu is titled ‘Elephants Out And About’ and depicts a group of young Elephants, the future of the herd.

This absolutely stunning piece measures 570 x 380mm.

Reserve: £250 Current Bid: £425 Dean Cheeseman

LOT 7

An original stunning watercolour by Diane Antone titled ‘The Badger’. It measures 210 x 297mm.

Reserve: £75 Current Bid

LOT 8

This is a stunning ORIGINAL watercolour study of a Lion by wildlife artist William Elliston.  This superb piece measures 420 x 300mm.

Reserve: £75 Current Bid:

LOT 9

This Pet Portrait Voucher has been very kindly donated by Pet Portrait and Wildlife Artist Sharon Spradbury. Sharon will draw a 1o” x 7″ head and shoulder portrait of the winner’s pet in pastels (P+P extra).

Reserve: £75 Current Bid:

LOT 10

This stunning study of an Orang Utan is by wildlife artist Jo Adams. This is a beautiful A4 Giclee Fine Art print and is No. 1 in a very Ltd Edition of only 100 prints.

Reserve: £30 Current Bid £55 Dean Cheeseman

LOT 11

‘An African Love Story’ is the life story of the late Dame Daphne Sheldrick DBE, who, with her late husband David, founded the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust which is dedicated to the rescue of orphaned Elephants. The book has been hand-signed by this magnificent lady.

Reserve: £50 Current Bid: £50 Claire Poil

LOT 12

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of an Amur Leopard by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410 x 530mm.

Reserve: £100 Current Bid:

LOT 13

This UNIQUE auction lot has been kindly donated by Nicky Campbell. Nicky will create a video montage put to music of the auction winner’s pet/pets.

Reserve: £50 Current Bid: £53 Rachel Upward

LOT 14

This is a signed plaque of Paralympic swimmer Stephanie Millward MBE who is one of the most experienced para-swimmers on the British team having won a total of ten medals, including two golds, across three games.

The plaque measures 300 x 210 x 5mm and would superb framed.

Reserve: £50 Current Bid:

LOT 15

This is an ORIGINAL watercolour, pastel and pencil study of an Red Fox by wildlife artist Milo. This STUNNING piece measures 410 x 530mm

Reserve: £100 Current Bid: £200 Jules_Orca

LOT 16

A football signed by the full squad and manager of West Bromwich Albion football club. It comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.

Reserve: £25 Current Bid: £45 Martin Bowen

LOT 17

This auction is for signed tops and photos very kindly donated by football and broadcasting legend Chris ‘Kammy’ Kamara.

Reserve: £35 Current Bid

LOT 18

This STUNNING Ltd Edition print is titled ‘Highland Monarch’ and is by Michael Demain.  It is measures 555 x 335mm

Reserve: £40 Current Bid: £85 ~ Jennifer Herd.

LOT 19

This ORIGINAL watercolour of a Stag by I Mills is stunning. It measures 280 x 380mm

Reserve: £50 Current Bid: £85 ~ Jennifer Herd.

LOT 20

‘Mischief Maker’ is a beautiful Ltd Edition study of a Lion cub by Julie Rhodes. It is mounted and measures 560 x 380mm.

Reserve £50 Current Bid

THANK YOU FOR LOOKING AND GOOD LUCK

LATE ADDITIONS

LOT 21

‘Lekupania with Giraffe’ by multi-award winning photojournalist and documentary filmmaker Ami Vitalle. This stunning image is of an orphaned baby reticulated giraffe embracing Sarara Camp wildlife keeper Lekupania. It measures 11 x 16 inches and normally sells for $550 on Ami’s website.

Reserve: £250 Current Bid:

LOT 22

‘Sleeping Fox’ by Jen Buckley Art. This is a Limited Edition print on 320gm acid free archival quality fine art  paper and measures 210 x 297 mm.

Resrve: £30 Current Bid: £60 Laker Allison 

LOT 23

‘Tails Erect’ by Wildlife Artist Carol Barrett. This ORIGINAL study of Warthogs is in watercolour and ink and is on Rhino Dung Paper! It is mounted and measures 400 x 300 mm.

Reserve: £200 Current Bid:

If you would like to make a donation to our fundraiser you can do so at Fundraiser To Help Disabled Animals

ANIMAL LOVER LAUNCHES FUNDRAISER TO BUILD A CENTRE FOR DISABLED ANIMALS

Some of the dogs that Victoria has saved (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)

When lockdown struck, Victoria Bryceson was in the process of pulling together funds to build an animal centre for disabled dogs and cats. The founder of the animal welfare charity, Miracle’s Mission, had planned a series of vegan festivals in the UK, with the aim to use the profits to launch her latest project. Unfortunately, as the pandemic has put a halt to all events, the charity is quickly running out of money – and all plans for the centre have been put on hold. This means that canines across the country are currently at risk of dying from disease, abandonment or due to vets being forced to put them down.

‘Ninety per cent of disabled dogs that are seen by vets are euthanised unnecessarily so there must be literally thousands of dogs killed like this in the UK,’ Victoria said. To save their lives, the charity founder is now turning to the public with a campaign to raise £20,000 – the equivalent of the centre’s property deposit.

Miracle’s Mission already has a waiting list of dogs in urgent need of help, such as those with missing limbs or who are paralysed. Once open, the centre will provide care for the vulnerable dogs and cats, offering veterinary assessments, MRIs, surgeries, the fitting of prosthetics and doggy wheels. Each pup will also be given a personalised rehabilitation plan with physiotherapy and hydrotherapy, as well as daily massages and TENS machine stimulation. Additionally, they will be able to play with each other in a sensory garden and given educational toys for mental and physical stimulation. Victoria said: ‘At the moment amputation of one leg is common practice with UK vets, as dogs can live very well and still be very active with three legs, especially if it is a back leg, as most of the weight is on the front legs. ‘However, when it comes to a double amputation, leaving the dog with two legs, the general vets that I have seen in the UK have said it’s definitely not possible to do this as the dogs won’t be left with a good quality of life.

‘The specialist hospitals seem more open to it as they have more experience in the area, but even they have problems where most of their dogs in these conditions are euthanised, not because they need to be but because in their words it is the owners of the dogs who can’t cope with the thought of a two legged-dog. ‘So there is a huge need for education in this area, amongst the public, dog owners and vets. ‘The animals coming into our care will initially all be stray dogs with nowhere else to go and no one else to help them. ‘They will either have been born with some sort of condition, such as a bent leg that they can’t walk on or they will have been in an accident – for example hit by a car or they will have been abused.’ Once the dogs (and cats) have recovered, Miracle’s Mission will then find them a forever home – but to be able to do this, people’s attitudes towards disabled animals need to change, explained Victoria.

She said: ‘We will offer a full rehabilitation programme right through from assessment to surgery to rehabilitation, recovery and re-homing. ‘This is again why education is so important, so that people become open to adopting disabled dogs. ‘If we don’t re-home the dogs, the centre will be full on day one and then we won’t be able to help any more, so it is really desperately needed that the dogs be re-homed.’ So far, the campaign has raised £5,355. Once she reaches her goal, Victoria can build the centre in Yorkshire, which she hopes to open in 2020.

Here is the amazing transformation of some of the dogs that Victoria has already saved.

Miracle, who inspired the charity’s name (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)
Look at Miracle now (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)

Many disabled dogs are euthanised but thankfully Nacho was saved (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)

Look at Nacho now – furry beauty (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)
Prince was badly malnourished when Victoria first met him (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)
Look at Prince’s happy face (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)

Willow had injured her legs (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)

Willow now has a wheelchair so she can be more independent on her walks (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)
Ella has lost one of her legs (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)
Ella in the hydrotherapy pool (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)
Ella proving that dogs can still live a full life on three legs (Picture: Victoria Bryceson)

If you would like to donate to this wonderful cause, you can do so on the Miracle’s Mission GoFundMe page.

Alternatively, if you want to host a fundraising event of your own, email Victoria for more information.

Senate Unanimously Passes PACT Act, Which Will Make Animal Cruelty A Federal Felony!

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would make animal cruelty a federal felony. The Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act, or PACT Act, bans abusive behavior including crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating, impaling and other bodily injury toward any non-humans.

The bill was introduced by two Florida congressmen, Democrat Ted Deutch and Republican Vern Buchanan, in January. It was approved Tuesday by a voice vote.

Representatives Ted Deutch, left, and Vern Buchanan, sponsors of the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act (PACT), in Washington in July. The House unanimously approved the bill.

The PACT Act expands the Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act, which was passed by Congress in 2010 and made the creation and distribution of animal crushing videos illegal. However, the new act closes a loophole by prohibiting the underlying acts of animal abuse, according to the office of Congressman Deutch

“There’s no place in a civilized society for maiming and torturing animals – period,” said Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, who is a co-sponsor of the Senate bill. Current federal law prohibits animal fighting and only criminalizes animal cruelty if the wrongdoers create and sell videos depicting the act. Under the PACT Act, a person can be prosecuted for crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating and impaling animals and sexually exploiting them. Those convicted would face federal felony charges, fines and up to seven years in prison.”I’m glad Congress is finally sending the PACT Act to the President’s desk to be signed into law,” Blumenthal said.Right now, all 50 states have laws in their books against animal cruelty on the state level. If President Trump signs the bill, authorities can go after the wrongdoers because they will have federal jurisdiction and will not be bound by state laws. They can also prosecute criminals if the cruelty occurs on federal property.

The Humane Society Legislative Fund called Tuesday’s Senate vote a well-deserved victory. “We’ve made the case for this measure for many years, and view it as one of the largest victories for animals in a long time,” President and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States Kitty Block said. She went on “Over the course of 30 years in animal protection, I have encountered terrible animal cruelties, but acts of intentional torture are the most disturbing because they demonstrate how some people treat the most vulnerable in our society,” . “Reps. Ted Deutch (D-Fla) and Vern Buchanan (R-Fla) are tremendous advocates for animal protection, and we thank them for their leadership in closing this important gap in the law.”

The bill has been endorsed by the National Sheriffs Association and the Fraternal Order of Police.