Far From Home: A Farmer In South Australia Finds Baby Seal In Wheat Crop 3km From Nearest Ocean

A South Australian farmer has released a baby Seal back into the ocean after finding it in a wheat crop on a farm near Cowell on the Eyre Peninsula.

THE BABY SEAL FOUND IN A FARMER’S WHEAT FIELD

A neighbour called farmer Ty Kayden and said that he had found a Seal on his driveway, 3km inland from the sea.

“My neighbour called me up, he said: ‘You have to come and have a look at this.’ I thought he said a baby cow is in my driveway. He goes: ‘No, it’s a baby Seal,’” Kayden said.

“I was like: ‘You’re kidding, we better come for a look,’” he said.

The closest Seal colony is about 80km up the coastline, he added.

Kayden’s family have been farming in the area for more than 60 years and have never seen one come this far inland.

“We pulled up and there is this tiny little three-foot [about 91cm] Seal, sitting right on the edge of the wheat crop,” he said.

“Three kilometres is a long way from the ocean — it’s a small two-wheel track to the beach. I have no idea how it got there or what it had been doing,” he said.

“Hopefully it’s had a big feed of king whiting and is looking a bit fatter,” Kayden said.

The Seal appeared frail, but Kayden noted that it was fortunate to be alive given the current prevalence of foxes in the area.

Since there was no nearby animal protection organization, they decided it would be best to return the Seal to the beach rather than leave him in the centre of the harvest.

The only thing we could do was bring him back to the beach and start him moving because there is nothing comparable to the RSPCA nearby, he claimed.

We simply dropped a towel over its head, picked it up, and placed it in a tub in the back of the pickup.

The Seal was taken to the beach, where it was high tide, by Kayden and his worker. The Seal first resisted leaving, but after a slight prod, it swam off into the shallow water.

FARMER TY KAYDEN’S SHOCK FINDING UNEXPECTED BABY ANIMAL IN HIS CROPS | TODAY SHOW AUSTRALIA

According to Kayden, “I’m hoping it’s had a large feed of king whiting and is looking a bit heavier.”

Although other species occasionally visit the shore, South Australian waters are home to Australian sea lions, long-nosed fur Seals, and Australian fur Seals.

According to Steve Reynolds, president of the Marine Life Society of South Australia, the animal was probably a Longnose New Zealand fur Seal, which is capable of walking on its flippers.

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HELP KANGAROO ISLAND WILDLIFE PARK TREAT ANIMALS INJURED IN THE AUSTRALIAN BUSHFIRES

Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park

The Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park has been overwhelmed by the kindness, good wishes and support from the Australian and international community for the wildlife icon, the Koala.

At least 25,000 Koalas are believed to have died in a horrific wildfire in South Australia that may have devastating consequences for the survival of the species.

Four dead Koalas lie on a vet’s table in Lismore

The fire on Kangaroo Island, which was considered a Koala safe-haven because its population had escaped a devastating chlamydia epidemic, was described as “virtually unstoppable” on Saturday by firefighters.

Koala rescuer Margaret Hearle stated that another important Koala population, nicknamed “the gene pool” because of its good health, had been “wiped out” in Crestwood, New South Wales.

Due to the recent tragic bushfires, the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park has received a lot of concerned phone calls and messages regarding the impacted wildlife from these fires.

Over the past few days they have started to see a large number of injured Koalas, along with other native species heavily impacted by this event. They have been treating these victims as best they can to supply pain relief, antibiotics, treatment to wounds and basic husbandry requirements. They spent most of January 3rd building extra holding enclosures as well as defending the park from the immediate threat of the fire and will continue to prepare more infrastructure to house the extra wildlife they expect to see over the coming weeks.

A KOALA RECOVERS AT THE KANGAROO ISLAND WILDLIFE PARK

They need much-needed funds to help with veterinary costs, Koala milk and supplements, extra holding/rehabilitation enclosures, as well as setting up a building to hold supplies to treat these animals.

Donations go directly towards the Koalas and other wildlife that they have coming in from the fires for their care, triage and ongoing treatments, housing, essential equipment, feed and more.

They are working around the clock with a highly experienced, qualified and dedicated team of volunteers including qualified vets, vet nurses and wildlife carers to rescue, rehabilitate and care for all of the animals coming in from the bushfires.

Sam Mitchell, owner of Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park

On admittance to the unit, all efforts are made to rehydrate, treat and assess the wildlife by their vet care team. Many are being treated for severe burns with most burns being to their hands, feet and rumps.

They are providing the best care possible for our injured wildlife and due to the significant habitat loss they will be building exhibits to hold the treated Koalas until arrangements can be made to release them back into the wild where possible.

SOME OF THE KOALAS WHO SURVIVED THE FIRES IN THE RECOVERY UNIT

Kangaroo Island is well known for its thriving Koala population however over 150,000 hectares has been lost due to recent events, this will effect our Koala population dramatically. We ALL need to pull together to save this Australian icon. Once conditions improve and they are granted access to fire ground, a qualified team will be going out to rescue wildlife caught in the fires and relocate those left without a food source or home.

PLEASE HELP RAISE MUCH-NEEDED FUNDS FOR THE KANGAROO ISLAND WILDLIFE PARK

To help raise funds for this vital project we are donating ALL proceeds from the sale of Badges, Brooches, Car Stickers, Tote Bags, Jewellery and Conservation Packs to help the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park treat animals affected by the #AustralianFires.

They are available from the Protect All Wildlife store at http://protect-all-wildlife.ecwid.com

KANGAROO ISLAND WILDLIFE PARK

Animal Advocacy, Animal Rescue, Animal Welfare, Environment, Wildlife Conservation/ Tags Australia, Bushfires, Dying Wildlife, Kangaroos, Koalas

The Incredible Moment A Koala Stopped Cyclists To Drink Water

This desperate koala can be seen hastily drinking water in a bid to cool down amid the soaring heat in Australia. The marsupial approached a group of cyclists who were riding towards Adelaide, where temperatures are nearing 40C. Anna Heusler said the group saw the stricken animal in the middle of the road when they went around a bend in the state of South Australia. She told 7 News: ‘Naturally we stopped because we were going to help relocate him off the road. ‘I stopped on my bike and he walked right up to me, quite quickly for a koala, and as I was giving him a drink from all our water bottles, he actually climbed up onto my bike. ‘None of us have ever seen anything like it.’

Video: #Bikebug2019 . The Koala desperately drinks water from cyclist Anna Heusler

Australia is currently experiencing a record-breaking heatwave, with average daily temperatures pushing into the high 40s. The heat has exacerbated the bushfires and more than four million hectares have already been burnt – an area roughly one-third of the size of England. Nearly 1,000 homes have been destroyed and nine people have been killed.

 The plight of the koala has come into particular focus as around 30% of their habitat has been destroyed. Thousands of the iconic marsupials are feared to have died in the fires, particularly in the hardest hit state of New South Wales. The state was home to around 28,000 koalas but their numbers are known to have been depleted since the crisis broke out around two months ago. They have perished either in the bushfires or from starvation and dehydration afterwards. Campaign group the Total Environment Centre said the government was not doing enough to help the animals and said management plans needed to be put in place. Director Jeff Angel added: ‘Survival of koalas is at emergency level with the decline of populations, loss of habitat and the bushfires. ‘We urge the government to do more, and quickly. Local residents have been rescuing the marsupials or taking them to specialist centres, where they have been treated for burns.

You can help Koalas and other animals affected by the devasting fires by supporting the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital fundraiser to help provide and build drinking stations in fire affected regions across New South Wales.

Please DONATE ANY amount, large or small, at: PLEASE HELP KOALAS 🐨