Significant Win For Animal Welfare As Scottish Parliament Votes To Pass New Hunting Legislation

Press release from League Against Cruel Sports (24th January 2023):

The Scottish Parliament has voted to pass the new Hunting with Dogs (Scotland) Bill. The vote was passed by 90 for and 30 against, with no abstentions. 

The new legislation was introduced last year, two decades after a failed attempt by the Scottish Parliament to ban hunting with the Protection of Wild Mammals (Scotland) Act, back in 2002.

The new Bill will bring into force a number of measures which significantly curtail mounted hunting activity, including reducing the number of dogs which can be used to hunt a wild mammal to just two, instead of a full pack, and reducing the number of dogs which can be used below ground to just one.

The Bill also includes a pre-emptive ban on trail hunting. Trail hunting is a sport which was created after hunting was banned in England and Wales following the passing of the Hunting Act in 2004. Its inclusion in the Bill means trail hunting can not be established north of the border.

Loopholes around fox hunting will be closed

The League Against Cruel Sports Scotland, has welcomed the new legislation. Director Robbie Marsland said:

As of today, Scotland has the most robust law anywhere in the UK to prevent the cruelty of chasing and killing wild mammals for sport – and this is something to celebrate. Despite a persistent campaign from those resolute to keep hunting alive in the Scottish countryside, the Scottish Government has been determined to end the sport of hunting, a sentiment which has today been supported by the Parliament.

The passing of the Hunting with Dogs (Scotland) Bill now provides an opportunity to right the wrongs of the last two decades and close the loopholes which allowed hunters to continue with hunting as though the law didn’t exist.

The inclusion of a ban on trail hunting is a significant victory for Scotland, meaning hunts will not be able to use this so-called sport as a smokescreen for traditional hunting.

The new Bill also includes a licensing system which will allow for a full pack of hounds to be used in certain circumstances. The detail of the scheme has yet to be developed but animal welfare campaigners have concerns this has the potential to be exploited.

Robbie Marsland added:

After twenty years of flawed legislation it is critical that this Bill is not simply a way of creating new loopholes for hunters to exploit, and the League is yet to be convinced the licensing scheme won’t do this.

Despite the best of intentions to ban hunting, the determination and deep rooted defiance among those who wish to chase and kill foxes should not be underestimated. The League will work closely with Nature Scot and other stakeholders to ensure the licensing system is robust, effective and fit for purpose.

The Hunting with Dogs Bill is expected to receive royal assent in the next few weeks and come into force in the autumn. 

ENDS

This is a significant win for campaigners in Scotland, including REVIVE coalition members the League Against Cruel Sports and OneKind, and will increase pressure on the Westminster Government to follow suit.

The proposed licensing scheme, which will allow the use of more than two dogs in “certain limited circumstances” has undoubtedly been brought in to help fend off any legal challenges but the details and effectiveness of the licences remain to be seen.

For example, will the licensing authority NatureScot think that footpacks running amok in public forests, killing foxes to protect gamebirds on grouse moors (e.g. see here) is an appropriate and licensable activity? We’ll see.

Charities Struggling To Raise Funds In “Animal Welfare Time Bomb”

Animal welfare charities are facing “significant” financial problems in the Covid-19 crisis due to falling donations, the closure of charity shops to protect volunteers, and the cancellation of fund raising events.

There has already been a rise in cancellations of charity donations by direct debit across the UK. The current cost of living crisis has affected rescue charities twofold. Donations have dropped significantly However, the need to help animals in need has increased DRAMATICALLY.

Many people who bought pets during the covid lockdown have handed them into rescue centres because they can no longer (or don’t want to) look after. The cost of living crisis means many people cannot afford the cost of keeping their pets.

To make matters worse, the pandemic struck at a bad time. When Lucy’s Law came into effect in England, many puppy farmers abandoned the ‘trade’ – a victory for animal welfare. However, this led to an increase in breeding dogs dumped to fend for themselves with no regard for their welfare – just as the charities looking after them struggle to raise enough funds to function.

Like many animal welfare charities, we are struggling after lockdown. Covid restrictions and the cost of living crisis has resulted in very little funding coming in. This has dramatically affected our ability to help charities who are really struggling at the moment.

Please help us help other by donating ANY amount, large or small, at the link below. EVERY penny counts at these desperate times.

Everyone who donates will receive a Certificate of Appreciation as a thank you for helping animals in need.

Certificate of Appreciation

R.I.P. Frodo, The Last Surviving Dog Rescued From Michael Vick’s Dogfighting Ring.

ANIMAL ABUSER MICHAEL VICK AND FRODO

In 2007, authorities rescued 51 Pit Bulls from a Virginia compound belonging to Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick. These dogs endured horrible torture. They were electrocuted, beaten, hanged, drowned, and forced to fight.

DOGS BEING RESCUED FROM VICK’S PROPERTY

Sadly, four of the dogs did not survive, but 47 brave Pitties did. These frightened, formerly abused dogs were given love and patience by several rescue organizations and their forever families.

THE 47 SURVIVING DOGS OF THE DOG-FIGHTING RING

One of these survivors, Frodo, lived to be 15 years old. He died on December 18th, 2021. After one year of hell at Vick’s compound, he spent the last 14 years being “pampered like a prince.”

R.I.P. “Sweet” Frodo

BAD RAP, an Oakland-based nonprofit animal welfare organization, announced the dog’s passing on Facebook. This organization helped immensely in advocating for the dogs and rehabilitating them.

The post from BAD RAP mourning Frodo’s loss states:

“Sweet Frodo – How we loved him. He was one of the bravest survivors we’ve ever met.”

FRODO

Frodo had a good life with his loving family, and he also went out surrounded by love. BAD RAP described the dog’s final moments:

“Frodo gobbled that big bag of steak under the tears of his mama, Kim Ramirez and her daughter Dominique. Thank you Dr. Williams for tending to his medical needs up until the end. He trusted you and you made this moment so perfect.”

The Story Of Frodo’s Recovery

Throughout his life, Frodo served as a face of the movement to eliminate the negative stereotype against Pit Bulls. He also proved the value of patience and kindness in a dog’s life.

BAD RAP, who have plenty of experience working with dogs seized from fighting situations, believed in these dogs from the start. In a previous post, BAD RAP wrote that dogs with difficult pasts deserve a chance:

“Frodo showed us that younger dogs pulled from cruelty cases need socialization from Day one so they can grow up strong and brave. In his case, he was approx. 3-6mos old when seized by authorities, and then waited six long and damaging months in solitary confinement for rescue help.”

Poor Frodo was especially shy and fearful when rescued from his horrible situation. In a 2009 interview with The Mercury News, Kim Ramirez, Frodo’s adopter, explained:

“Anything mechanical, the sound bothers him. We have ceiling fans at our house and he would become fixated on them, looking up at them with apprehension. If I opened a cabinet, he would shy away. Or popcorn in the microwave. I don’t know, maybe the popcorn equates to gunshots for him. I don’t think he witnessed any of the fights. But I’m sure he heard them.”

Luckily, Frodo had the Ramirez family, who showed him so much love and patience. The sweet dog’s family even pushed him around in a stroller when his legs started to fail him.

R.I.P. to a true survivor.

The 48 Surviving “Vick” Dogs And Their Heroes

In 2019, 13 dogs freed from Vick’s ring were still alive, 12 years later. Just two days before Frodo passed, Jonny Justice died surrounded by his family, and Uba crossed the rainbow bridge in October 2021.

These dogs were given the chances they deserved, and they all lived happy lives despite their pasts.

BAD RAP also acknowledged how hard several rescue groups worked to change these dogs’ lives for the better. While BAD RAP and Best Friends received most of the public appreciation, these organizations helped rehabilitate the Pitties too:

  • The Richmond Animal League
  • Georgia SPCA
  • SPCA of Monterey County
  • Out of the Pits
  • Our Pack
  • Recycled Love
  • Animal Rescue of Tidewater
  • Animal Farm Foundation

When animal advocates come together, great things can happen. These 48 “Vick” dogs prove that.

What happened to Michael Vick?

Vick served just 19 months in federal prison for bankrolling the dogfighting, even after admitting to killing dogs. Despite this injustice, the high-profile case helped change the way the world sees Pit Bulls and how abused dogs can be rehabilitated.

Protesters at the Michael Vick hearing outside the Sussex County Courthouse in Sussex, Va.
What you can do to help animals in need:
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Protect All Wildlife are involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to Protect All Wildlife supports ALL of our worthy programmes and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Your donations make our work possible. Thank you for your support.

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Bobbie The Wonder Dog, The Inspiration Behind Lassie Returns.

Bobbie and his owner, G. Frank Brazier. Courtesy Vades Crockett, Silverton.

Bob was an average-looking collie puppy in every way, except for his bobbed tail . . . and maybe that’s why the Brazier family named him Bob, or Bobbie. But he was average in no other way. 

In 1923, Bobbie joined Frank and Elizabeth Brazier for a cross-country drive from Silverton, Oregon, to Indiana, Frank’s home state, where they planned to visit family. During a stop in Indiana, Bobbie was chased off by loose dogs, and after a week of searching and placing newspaper ads, the broken-hearted Braziers had to give up and start the drive home.

Bobbie the Wonder Dog perches on the trunk of the Braziers’ touring car in Silverton. Photo Offbeat Oregon

Six months to the day after he was lost in Indiana, a very thin Bobbie was spotted on a Silverton sidewalk, his coat matted, his paws raw from wear. Unbelievable as it seemed, the three-year-old dog had WALKED almost 2,800 miles to get back home.

Though weak and tired, Bobbie went berserk with joy when he was reunited with his family, and from that day, all of their lives changed. In the weeks and months that followed, his story tore across the country in newspapers and even in a hardcover collection of pet stories. He was the main attraction at an Oregon home-builders convention in Portland, where thousands lined up to pet him, and he starred in a short feature film. Also, the Braziers eventually heard from people along Bobbie’s homeward-bound route, places where he’d stopped long enough to recoup, and then he was gone again. These stories verified their thinking. Bobbie had done the impossible.

Bobbie’s remarkable journey thrilled readers around the country, who wanted to know more about “The Wonder Dog.” The Oregon Humane Society in Portland investigated and confirmed that he had traveled about 2,800 miles on foot. They presented Bobbie with a silver medal and keys to the city. Letters and presents poured in daily.

Frank wrote about him in Animal Pals, a book of dog stories, and Bobbie starred in a silent movie. Bobbie’s feat even appeared in Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Bobbie got so famous that at one weeklong appearance, more than 100,000 people showed up to pet him.


In April 1925, Bobbie became a parent with another collie named Tippy. She gave birth to sixteen puppies-all boys-and Bobbie made headlines again.

When Bobbie died 1927, he was buried in Portland, Oregon, by the Oregon Humane Society. Rin Tin-Tin, the dog star of twenty-seven Hollywood movies, was there to lay a wreath at his funeral, which was officiated by the mayor of Portland.

Rin Tin-Tin, the dog star of 27 Hollywood movies, lays a wreath at Bobbie’s funeral.

In 1932, Silverton hosted its first Pet Parade to honor Bobbie, with his son Pal leading the way. Every summer since then, the town has celebrated with a parade and a Bobbie Look-Alike Contest. Bobbie’s Castle, his red-and-white doghouse, stands over his burial place at the Oregon Humane Society’s animal cemetery.

Bobbie’s Castle

A statue in Silverton pay tribute to their famous dog.

This incredible story is all true, and the origins of Lassie Come Home are said to be traced to the story of Bob of Silverton, also known as Bobbie, the Wonder Dog.

Bobbie The Wonder Dog
Lassie Come Home
What you can do to help animals in need:
Support ‘Protect All Wildlife’ by donating as little as £1 – It only takes a minute but it can last a lifetime for an animal in need.

We believe EVERY animal should be treated with respect, empathy, and understanding. We raise awareness to protect and conserve wild, captive, companion and farm animals. It is vital that we protect animals against acts of cruelty, abuse, and neglect by enforcing established animal welfare laws and, when necessary, take action to ensure that those who abuse animals are brought to justice.

Protect All Wildlife are involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to Protect All Wildlife supports ALL of our worthy programmes and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Your donations make our work possible. Thank you for your support.

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The ‘Animal-Loving’ Ukrainian Sniper Who Rescues Abandoned Pets From Battlefield.

Oksana Krasnova with a rescued dog. (Oksana Krasnova/PA)

An “animal-loving” Ukrainian sniper and her husband fighting on the frontline have rescued dozens of pets after discovering them abandoned on the battlefield.

Oksana Krasnova, 27, uses her wages to pay for food and supplies to nurse the animals back to health before arranging for them to be transported on military vehicles to the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, to be rehomed.

Oksana Krasnova (left), 27, and her husband Stanislav Krasnov, 35, holding a rescued cat. (Oksana Krasnova/PA)

Oksana had previously worked as a lawyer in the capital until Russia invaded the country six months ago and she joined the Ukrainian frontline defence, fighting in the Donetsk region.

In between working as snipers, Oksana and her husband Stanislav Krasnov, 35, have rescued almost 30 pets they have discovered when passing through abandoned villages.

Speaking to the PA news agency from the frontline, Oksana said: “I love animals a lot and I used to help rescue animals with my husband even before the Russian invasion.

“I come across a lot of abandoned pets when I am going about my duties and I can’t just leave them.

“It’s hard to evacuate animals from the frontline but these poor pets have been used to living with humans so they can’t survive on their own.

“I have my own pets who are being looked after by my parents in Kyiv and I could never dream of abandoning them.”

The first animal the couple rescued was a black dog they found in an abandoned house. (Oksana Krasnova/PA)

Oksana said her most memorable rescue to date was the first abandoned animal she saved on the frontline.

The couple had heard “some strange sounds” while walking through an abandoned house and found a small, black dog trapped in the building.

Oksana said the animal was “clearly traumatised” and had been surviving off raw potatoes when they discovered her.

“I think she had been there for about a month – it was awful,” she said.

“She was just lying on the floor and we placed a pillow under her head while she was barking and crying and foaming at the mouth.

“We had to push her into a box and transport her in our military vehicle.

“She was having seizures and we didn’t think she would survive.”

Oskana and Stanislav have rescued almost 30 pets they discovered when passing through abandoned villages. (Oksana Krasnova/PA)

Oksana fed the dog every hour and cared for her around the clock until her health began to improve.

“We have a friend who has some volunteers out in Kyiv who work with traumatised animals and he took in the poor dog,” she said.

“Months on, she’s now okay and she lives with a foster family.”

Oksana said she mainly rescues dogs and cats but has occasionally helped smaller creatures like birds and rabbits, which she tends to release into the wild once healthy.

“At the moment where we are based we have a herd of pigs with us from one of the nearby villages,” Oksana said.

“Obviously we can’t rescue them as they won’t all fit in our military vehicles but we are making sure they are okay and have enough food.”

The rescued animals have become a huge part of the couple’s life and even when Stanislav was wounded, he was joined by a small kitten while he was strapped to a stretcher receiving medical treatment.

A rescued kitten sits on Stanislav while he receives medical treatment after being injured. (Oksana Krasnova/PA)

“The animals we rescue are really very grateful and loyal,” Oksana said.

“Sometimes it’s really hard (to say goodbye to them) mainly because I spend so much time treating them.

“But I feel relieved because I know that they won’t starve and suffer again,” she added.

How you can help animals in need:
Support ‘Protect All Wildlife’ by donating as little as £1 – It only takes a minute but it can last a lifetime for an animal in need.

We believe EVERY animal should be treated with respect, empathy, and understanding. We raise awareness to protect and conserve wild, captive, companion and farm animals. It is vital that we protect animals against acts of cruelty, abuse, and neglect by enforcing established animal welfare laws and, when necessary, take action to ensure that those who abuse animals are brought to justice.

Protect All Wildlife are involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to Protect All Wildlife supports ALL of our worthy programmes and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Your donations make our work possible. Thank you for your support.

Everyone who donates will receive a Certificate of Appreciation as a thank you for supporting wildlife.

CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION

Ricky Gervais Speaks Out To Save Roscommon Ex-Garda’s Dog Kim From Being Put Down

RICKY GERVAIS GIVES HIS SUPPORT FOR DONAL AND KIM

The After Life creator took to Twitter to show his support for Donal Rogers and his dog Kim, calling the situation ‘sad and frustrating’ – his tweet has received masses of support.

Ricky Gervais has become the latest person to join in the fight to save ex-Garda Donal Rodgers’ dog Kim.

The Jack Russell was ordered by a court to be put down after she reportedly bit a woman while walking on the Strokestown Famine Trail in Co Roscommon on March 6th.

However, the UK comedian has said that the order to put her down is “sad and frustrating”.

More than 600 people have donated €12,868 in a bid to help Roscommon’s Mr Rogers and his beloved pup – surpassing the fundraiser’s goal of €5,000.

Hundreds of thousands of people have also signed a Change.org petition to save the dog.

Retweeting a post about Donal and Kim that asked for “high public exposure”, Ricky Gervais wrote: “This is so sad and frustrating. Anyone out there know how this dog can be saved? #SaveKim”

Donal launched an appeal in the High Court to prevent Kim from being put down, but on July 28th, he withdrew the appeal after the court indicated to him “that there were other avenues to pursue.

“The battle is far from over, not even half over,” Donal told Gript.ie. “My supporters are fighting to keep Kim alive. I have wonderful support from all over the country.”

DONAL ROGERS AND HIS BELOVED JACK RUSSELL KIM

How to help Kim:

Donate at: Help Mr Rogers And Kim

Sign the petition at: https://www.change.org/p/save-kim

Ricky Gervais’ Canine Co-Star Antilly Enjoys Booming Career Following After Life Success

TONY AND BRANDY (RICKY GERVAIS AND ANTILLY)

Antilly, the German Shepherd who shared the screen with comedian and actor Ricky Gervais in After Life, is adding plenty of screen credits to her CV since the show.

She won the hearts of TV viewers worldwide as Ricky Gervais’ loyal dog in Netflix smash After Life.

RICKY AND ANTILLY

And thanks to her role as Brandy, the pup who gives Ricky’s character Tony Johnson a reason to live after his wife’s death, Antilly’s career is booming.

ANTILLY

The German Shepherd has been to Belfast to shoot scenes with Hollywood stars Chris Pine and Michelle Rodriguez for a blockbuster Dungeons And Dragons film.

ANTILLY IN DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS

And she’s starring in upcoming BBC drama Sherwood with David Morrissey and Robert Glenister as well as Netflix spy series Treason with Charlie Cox and Olga Kurylenko.

Antilly has graced screens since she was a puppy, playing everything from Army hounds to police dogs.

She’s also worked with A-listers including Tom Cruise and George Clooney, who said she was the best-trained dog he’d seen.

Antilly’s owner Ashley Foster jokes: “They bring us over to do the serious acting.”

Ashley started as an animal trainer 10 years ago and worked on Batman flick The Dark Knight Rises with Antilly’s parents – he was one of villain Bane’s henchmen with the dogs playing attack hounds.

Antilly followed in her parents’ pawprints and signed with Stunt Dogs & Animals. The company was working on a film with Michael Fassbender and wanted a police dog to bite him – one of Antilly’s many skills.

ANTILLY’S DAD ASHLEY

Using protective sleeves, Ashley, 34, safely directs the clever canine where to bite. He says: “She’s very controlled. As soon as the director calls cut and I tell her to let go, she lets go straightaway.”

Antilly’s skills are so honed, she even managed to convince a scared stuntman on Martin Clunes’ series Doc Martin to do a dog bite scene.

ANTILLY CHASES DOC MARTIN (MARTIN CLUNES)

Ashley, from Bicester, Oxon, says: “He’d done one before, they’d used two ex-police dogs and they couldn’t get the dogs off him. I had to show how she works for him to agree to do it.”

The talented pooch, 10, has a wide range of tricks from shaking her head and limping on command to playing dead. All she needs is the reward of a sausage and Ashley stands off-camera, tempting her with his telescopic bait stick.

(OUTTAKE) ANTILLY AND RICKY ON THE SET OF AFTERLIFE

“She’ll lie there, completely still,” he says. “People could be crying and wailing over her and she won’t move. Every time she does something she will get paid with a sausage.”

Ashley often appears alongside Antilly and after receiving the script, they do lots of prep work to make sure she is happy.

PREPARED FOR AN AFTERLIFE SCENE

Ashley adds: “For After Life there wasn’t really much to prepare for. It was straightforward.”

When they’re not filming scenes, he uses the time to work on training.

He also brings other dogs with him to train, including German Shepherd pup Pen, who has already worked as a police dog in TV shows and will eventually take over from Antilly.

For now, though, she is continuing her film work. Ashley says: “She’s still super fit, healthy and happy and loves to work.”

Ashley and Antilly are backing a new challenge from charity Street Paws, encouraging Brits to walk 274,000 steps in April for every homeless person in England.

Founded in Newcastle in 2016, Street Paws provides free accessible vet care and support services to homeless people and their pets.

STREET PAWS

Ashley says: “The work they do can save people. I’ve known people who are struggling to find housing and have got a dog and are really worried about not being able to find somewhere to live with them.”

What you can do to help rescue animals:
Support ‘Protect All Wildlife’ by donating as little as £1 – It only takes a minute but it can last a lifetime for an animal in need.

We believe EVERY animal should be treated with respect, empathy, and understanding. We raise awareness to protect and conserve wild, captive, companion and farm animals. It is vital that we protect animals against acts of cruelty, abuse, and neglect by enforcing established animal welfare laws and, when necessary, take action to ensure that those who abuse animals are brought to justice.

Protect All Wildlife are involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to Protect All Wildlife supports ALL of our worthy programmes and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Your donations make our work possible. Thank you for your support.

Everyone who donates will receive a Certificate of Appreciation as a thank you for supporting wildlife.

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When Tomorrow Starts Without Me

When tomorrow starts without me, 
And I’m not there to see;
The sun will rise and find your eyes
All filled with tears for me

I wish so much you wouldn’t cry 
The way you did today,
I know how much you loved me,
As much as I love you, 
And each time that you think of me
I know you’ll miss me too.

But when tomorrow starts without me,
please try to understand 
That an angel came and called my name
And petted me with her hand.

She said my place was ready, 
In Heaven far above, 
And that I’d have to leave behind
All those I dearly love. 

But,as I turned to heel away, 
A tear fell from my eye, 
For all my life I never thought 
That I would have to die. 

I had so much to live for, 
So many sits and downs to do,
It seemed almost impossible, 
That I was leaving you. 

I thought about our lives together,
I know you must be sad, 
I thought of all the love we shared, 
And all the fun we had. 

Remember when I’d nudge your hand,
And poke you with my nose? 
The frisbee I would gladly chase,
The bad guy,I’d “bark and hold” 

If I could relive yesterday,
Just even for awhile, 
I’d wag my tail and kiss you,
Just so I could see you smile. 

But then I fully realized, 
That this could never be 
For emptiness and memories 
Will take the place of me. 

And when I thought of treats and toys 
I might miss come tomorrow,
I thought of you and when I did, 
My dog-heart filled with sorrow. 

But when I walked through Heaven’s gate;
And felt so much at home; 
As God looked down and smiled at me,
From His beautiful throne. 

He said,”This is eternity”, 
And now we welcome you, 
Today your life on earth is past, 
But here is starts anew. 

I promise no tomorrow, 
But today will always last; 
For you see,each days’ the same, 
There’s no longing for the past. 

Now you have been so faithful 
So trusting, loyal and true; 
Though there were times you did things, 
You knew you shouldn’t do 

But good dogs are forgiven,
And now at last you’re free;
So won’t you sit here by my side,
And wait right here with me? 

So when tomorrow starts without me,
Don’t think we’re far apart, 
For every time you think of me,
I’m right there, in your heart. 

Author unkown

What you can do to help animals in need:
Support ‘Protect All Wildlife’ by donating as little as £1 – It only takes a minute but it can last a lifetime for an animal in need.

We believe EVERY animal should be treated with respect, empathy, and understanding. We raise awareness to protect and conserve wild, captive, companion and farm animals. It is vital that we protect animals against acts of cruelty, abuse, and neglect by enforcing established animal welfare laws and, when necessary, take action to ensure that those who abuse animals are brought to justice.

Protect All Wildlife are involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to Protect All Wildlife supports ALL of our worthy programmes and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Your donations make our work possible. Thank you for your support.

Everyone who donates will receive a Certificate of Appreciation as a thank you for supporting wildlife.

CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION

GoD and DoG

When God had made the earth and sky,
The flowers and the trees,
He then made all the animals,
The fish, the birds and bees.

And when at last He’d finished,
Not one was quite the same,
God said, “I’ll walk this earth of mine,
And give each one a name.”

And so He travelled far and wide,
And everywhere He went,
A little creature followed Him,
Until its strength was spent.

When all were named upon the earth,
And in the sky and sea,
The little creature said, “Dear Lord,
There’s not one left for me.”

Kindly the Father said to him,
“I’ve left you to the end,
I’ve turned my own name back to front,
And call you DOG, my friend.

What you can do to help animals in need:

Support ‘Protect All Wildlife’ by donating as little as £1 – It only takes a minute but it can last a lifetime for an animal in need. Thank you.

We believe EVERY animal should be treated with respect, empathy, and understanding. We raise awareness to protect and conserve wild, captive, companion and farm animals. It is vital that we protect animals against acts of cruelty, abuse, and neglect by enforcing established animal welfare laws and, when necessary, take action to ensure that those who abuse animals are brought to justice.

Protect All Wildlife are involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to Protect All Wildlife supports ALL of our worthy programmes and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Your donations make our work possible. Thank you for your support.

Everyone who donates will receive a Certificate of Appreciation as a thank you for supporting wildlife.

Certificate of Appreciation

The Story Of Camberley Kate: A Dog Rescuer Extraordinaire

CAMBERLEY KATE AND HER MANY RESCUES

Kate Ward’s nickname “Camberley Kate” is said to have been given to her by historian Sir Arthur Bryant in his book “The Lion and the Unicorn”. It became the title by which she became known to everyone.

Kate’s early history is somewhat hazy – When interviewed she stated that she was born in Middlesbrough on June 13th 1895, and remained proud of her Yorkshire roots. Orphaned before she was ten, she was brought up by an aunt in a strict religious atmosphere. As a young girl she went into service, in Yorkshire and eventually found her way to Camberley. In 1943 Kate bought a cottage in Yorktown, and soon afterwards took in her first stray, a dog which had been about to be put down due to lameness.

As word grew, the number of dogs in her cottage increased – some being tied to her door, some left in carrier bags, others brought in by the police or other agencies. At the end of her life she estimated that she had looked after more than 600 dogs and local vet Geoffrey Craddock, a great admirer of Kate work testified that they were well looked after. An entry in the 1957 directory FOR Camberley reads “Ward K 218 London Road., Cam., Dogs Home”. In 1976 she stated that she had 34 dogs, although by 1977 she had cut this down to 19, as she had been told to go easier at the age of 82! The growth of other dog rescue centres helped in this regard. She also had at least one cat.


Kate and her olive-green painted hand cart, labelled STRAY DOGS, was a familiar sight locally as she pushed it from Yorktown to Camberley each day, through the town centre and up to Barossa Common, on a route suggested by the police. Some of the dogs were allowed to ride in the cart, others were attached to it with lengths of string, and occasionally a favoured few ran loose alongside. Inside the cart, there was usually some meat for the dogs and a shovel to clean any mess away. The dogs were controlled with the help of a whistle. Locals became used to the sight of Kate pushing her cart along the busy London Road although it never ceased to amaze outsiders.

As a local celebrity Kate and her dogs were much photographed, a situation she tolerated as long as the photographer gave a donation for the upkeep of the animals. She also sold her own photographic postcards, and gave short shrift to those who tried to take their own pictures. Generous supporters gave money to assist her work and some even left bequests. She was scrupulous that this money should be used only for its intended purpose: the dogs had their own bank account, administered by 2 trustees. She left money in trust for the few dogs left at her death.

If you gave her some money, she would INSIST you take a photo. That way she could not be accused of begging.


A diminutive figure with her shock of white hair and her beret, Kate defended herself and her work passionately against her critics, such as those who wanted her out of the town centre or who regarded the dogs as dangerous or a health or traffic hazard. On one occasion she rammed a new car which was blocking her way. She also had a number of disputes with the authorities. These clashes were often recorded in the columns of the press. However she won the backing of the local police for her work in taking abandoned dogs in off the streets.

In 21 August 1969 Kate was in the Camberley News fighting plans to introduce a bye law making it illegal for dogs to be out without a lead. This followed complains from residents of new housing estates, and concerns about road accidents caused by stray dogs. In her customary forthright fashion she condemned “The Council is nothing more than a collection of dog-haters. I think this will be rotten. It means that dogs will be chained up all day”. A proposal to ban dogs from the new precinct in Camberley also met with a terse response, particularly since she was in the habit of shopping at Sainsbury’s and leaving some of the dogs tied up outside. When protests about the local drag-hounds running out of control when being exercised attracted her support Kate, in typical fashion, addressed her complaint directly to the King. The Royal family continued to be a favourite route for correspondence. When a local schoolteacher complained that she had seen her beat her dogs with a stick, Kate immediately wrote in protest to the Queen. This was not their first encounter – when Princess Elizabeth got married one of the dogs sent a present of a dog lead.


As these anecdotes show, Kate was an excellent publicist. A local policemen recalled that occasionally a dog would get loose and be brought to the dog pound. If the Police Station was empty she would pay the fine quietly and readily, but if there was an audience she would protest vocally!

Following a series of strokes old age and ill-health forced her to leave her cottage and her remaining seven dogs were put into kennels. Her last weeks were spent at Kingsclear residential home and she died on 4th August 1979. Her funeral was at St Michael’s, Yorktown.

Despite her avowed dislike of people, Baptist Minister the Rev Chris Russell who officiated at her funeral, remembers her private generosity to those in need. This aspect of her life she kept anonymous, passing on her donations through third parties.

After her death, Camberley vet Geoffrey Craddock was quoted in the Camberley News as saying “Camberley has lost its most celebrated and best known character. She will be greatly missed by those of us who had the rare privilege of knowing her”.


During her lifetime, Kate’s fame spread far and wide. She featured In the national press and on television programmes such as “Nationwide” and “Tonight”. was featured on NBC in the United States and her story appeared in publications across Europe from France to Rumania. She also received the ultimate accolade of a feature in “Time” Magazine, and was photographed by Lord Snowdon. To her surprise, in 1967 she received an award from the magazine “Dog’s Life” for her work. In answer to the inevitable question, why she did it? her invariable reply was that she preferred dogs to humans.


Her home at 218 London Road was just a few doors along from the former Lamb pub, near the present Meadows roundabout, but Is no longer standing. The Katherine Court retirement flats were named after her at the suggestion of a local resident in 2000.

There are so many great lessons we can learn from the life of Kate Ward, both as responsible dog owners, human beings, and as pet rescue charities. Most of all Kate recognized the value of a photograph and how it could be used for the positive influence of others, to bring light to a cause, and to help raise money.

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