The BIG LIE About Lion Trophy Hunting

So often we hear from the pro-hunting lobby that by killing free roaming Lions, trophy hunters are actually saving Lions.

That term “sustainable off-take” often creeps into the justification. The trophy hunting of free roaming Lions is about as sustainable as putting ice cubes in a mug of steaming coffee. Let’s dig deeper into this issue of sustainable, shall we?

Consider the following six examples of why the trophy hunting of free-roaming Lions is NOT sustainable – from the very countries held high by the trophy hunting industry itself as being paragons of sustainable hunting practices:

  1. The Namibian government does not know how many breeding-age desert-adapted Lions are left, how many territory/pride males there are, or even how many of each sex are killed during human-Lion conflict. They told me so – see this article written by me. And yet each year they set trophy hunting quotas for large male desert-adapted Lions. The awarding of trophy hunting quotas off the back of no relevant statistics is NOT sustainable.
  2. Namibian laws permit rural livestock owners to request for the lethal removal of predators targeting their livestock – so-called ‘problem animals’. Fair enough. BUT trophy hunters are often used to perform the execution, and we know that trophy hunters want to shoot big male Lions. And communities benefit financially when ‘problem animals’ are identified and taken down by hunters. Is it coincidence then that there is a large bias towards male Lions amongst those Lions reported as being ‘problem animals’, and consequently executed by trophy hunters?

In the last scientific research report on Namibia’s desert-adapted Lions, published in 2010, the author states, when referring to six collared male Lions killed by trophy hunters as ‘problem animals’: “In all six cases, however, it is arguable whether the adult males that were shot, were in fact the Lions responsible for the killing of livestock.”

This gap in legislation – empowering the two beneficiaries of ‘problem animal’ execution to act as witness, jury, judge and executioner – is NOT sustainable.

  1. The above report concluded: “The long-term viability of the desert Lion population has been compromised by the excessive killing of adult and sub-adult males. There is an urgent need to adapt the management and utilisation strategies relating to Lions, if the long-term conservation of the species in the Kunene were to be secured.”

Since then the situation has worsened as regards male Lion offtake, with some areas now almost devoid of male Lions. Even the last known adult male Lion in the Sesfontein Conservancy was earmarked to be shot – again conveniently classified as a ‘problem animal’ – until international pressure forced the Minister to change his mind. A rapidly reducing male/female Lion ratio is NOT sustainable.

  1. Craig Packer, director of the Lion Research Center at the University of Minnesota, has led a series of studies identifying over-hunting as the major reason for the steep decline in Lion populations in Tanzania, the Lion hunting mecca. Packer was banned from entering Tanzania for exposing corruption with regard to Lion trophy hunting.
  1. When 13-year-old Cecil the Lion was shot in Zimbabwe, the over-riding justification was that he was ‘too old’ to breed or to successfully hold a territory (as if those are the only uses of a mature Lion). Then, Cecil’s son, Xanda, was also shot by a hunter, at the age of six – and the professional hunter Richard Cooke knew that Xanda was a pride male with cubs, and lied about the situation. In fact, Cooke also led the hunt that killed Xanda’s other son – at the age of four.

So, Lions of all ages are being shot, and the trophy hunting industry lies and re-invents the justifications each time to suit their need to keep the business model rolling. That is NOT sustainable.

cecil30n-7-web
Walter Palmer, the US dentist who shot Cecil The Lion, poses with another Lion that he killed
  1. Rural communities living amongst wild Lions have to see meaningful and sustainable benefit from having Lions in the area. Lions are often a threat to lives and livelihoods and these people have the right to expect to be compensated to behave differently. After all, the rest of the world has mostly sanitised itself of large predators.

Surely for trophy hunting to be truly sustainable, these communities must receive a significant portion of the trophy fee? A 2013 study by Economists at Large, an Australian organisation of conservation-minded economists, found that on average only 3% of money generated by trophy hunting winds up in the hands of local people.

During research for my article referred to in point one above, Namibian government officials told me that the relevant community only receives about 12.5% of the trophy hunting fee for a quota Lion (US$10,000 of the ± US$80,000 fee) – and only about 1% in the case of a ‘problem animal’ hunt. The rest goes to the professional hunting operator. This is NOT fair or sustainable.

This is what we do know about Lions: Populations have crashed from about 450,000 in the 1940’s to about 20,000 today – mostly due to human-wildlife conflict, habitat loss, prey base loss and trophy hunting (US Fish and Wildlife Services).

The remaining pockets of Lions are increasingly isolated from other populations, and no longer able to disperse and so maintain population genetic diversity and stability. When young males flee from dominant pride males, and seek out other Lions, they leave protected areas and are picked off by hunters and livestock farmers – thus preventing the vital dispersal of young Lions to other areas.

The surgical removal of big male Lions by trophy hunters within the context of the above is NOT sustainable in any way, shape or form – regardless of what the other causes of Lion population reductions are. The trophy hunting industry claim of sustainable practises is nothing but a lie. It’s a fiercely protected justification to continue the senseless and outdated fetish for killing off Africa’s big male Lions for fun and ego. The fantasies of a few rich people are taking precedence over the survival of an African icon, over the proper functioning of Africa’s wild places and over the tourism industry which brings in many times more revenue, jobs, skills enhancement and societal benefits.

The trophy hunting of Africa’s wild, free roaming Lions is NOT sustainable and has to stop.

Originally posted in Africa Geographic on 10th August 2017

Please SHARE to raise awareness to the REAL effect of Lion trophy hunting. Please SUBSCRIBE for news and updates.

How can you help? Please SIGN the petition to Ban Trophy Hunting at https://www.thepetitionsite.com/en-gb/776/729/850/president-zuma-when-the-wildlife-is-gone-what-then-ban-trophy-hunting-now/?taf_id=43202064&cid=twitter

Please SHARE to raise awareness to the REAL effect of Lion trophy hunting. Please SUBSCRIBE for news and updates.

Advertisements