A TURKISH COMPANY MAKE ROOF TILES THAT ALSO DOUBLE AS BIRD NESTING BOXES

Today, approximately 55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, according to the UN. As a result, animals are forced to find ways to share these tight urban spaces with us humans, and it isn’t always straightforward. Birds are no exception. The creative designs could be key to solving a decline in urban bird populations.

TURKISH COMPANY HITIT TERRA MANUFACTURE ROOF TILES THAT DOUBLE AS BIRD SHELTERS

It all began when the Dutch product design agency Klaas Kuiken came up with the idea to design a roof tile that doubles as a bird house. The idea was pounced upon by Hitit Terra, a Turkish terracotta manufacturer based in the town of Çorum, which then started producing the bird nest tiles for the local communities.

Mahmoud Basic, the regional director for Turkish National Parks, told a local news website that the tiles were to be produced and distributed to the people free of charge.

The Hitit Terra founders, Cengiz Başaranhıncal and Ali Arslan, said that the idea to produce bird nest tiles came after they saw the design on social media. Ali explained that the price of the tile online came out at around $70* which, in his opinion, was too high and they started making their own product for a local market.

*The Dutch tiles they are referring to are in fact more than twice that price, so wherever they saw them for $70 was a bargain.

Hitit Terra’s bird nest tiles were tested by Afyon Nature Conservation and the 5th Regional Directorate of National Parks and re-designed according to the demand. They now produce 5 different tile designs that accommodate different bird species.

Ali Arslan, one of the company partners, said they started producing roof tiles with bird nests two years ago. They have sent 3 thousand products to various municipalities and institutions so far.

Explaining that they redesigned the birdhouse tile on the internet in a different way, Arslan said, “It was sold on the Internet for around $ 70 each. We thought it was a disadvantage to launch a product related to nature with such a high price. We get the point. Those who want, instead of bringing Turkey from abroad, we provide access to these products from Corum.”

“Demand is increasing as it is a new product” Expressing that the interest in bird nest tiles is increasing day by day, Arslan stated that until today, the 5th Regional Directorate of Afyon Nature Conservation and National Parks, municipalities of various provinces, companies and citizens who want to put them on the roof of their homes have produced 3 thousand pieces.

Stating that they received very good comments, especially on social media, Arslan said: “Especially in many buildings built during the Ottoman period, we see that there are such structures for the eating, drinking and sheltering needs of birds. We also wanted to keep the tradition of our ancestors alive and contribute to the animals we share our world with. We received very good reactions from all segments after production. Congratulations from many places, especially organisations and municipalities, and thanks on social media. This happiness leads us to make more quality and different products. The demands are increasing gradually as it is a new product.

A PRODUCT THAT CONTRIBUTES TO THE INCREASE OF THE BIRD POPULATION IN CITIES AND VILLAGES

In consultation with Vogelbescherming Nederland (Dutch organisation concerning the protection of birds), Klaas Kuiken originally developed “Vogelhuisjesdakpan” (the Birdhouse roof tile); the merge of a basic terracotta roof tile with the archetypal shape of a house. The result is a remarkable product that not only looks good, but also contributes to the increase of the bird population in cities and villages.

Inside the Birdhouse, underneath the roof tile, a carefully designed nesting basket made of wood and bird screen is attached. This nesting basket ensures good ventilation, prevents the birds from moving to other places underneath your roof and makes it really easy to clean the nest after a breeding period.

By installing one or more of these Birdhouse roof tiles, you ensure that birds are provided with a safe place to stay and raise their chicks. Instead of crawling under the roof tiles to build a nest, the birds can now linger in their own cosy cottage.

Bird houses are rooted in Turkish history. Back in the times of the Ottoman Empire, people would build elaborate architectural miniature palaces for the birds. Not only did they give animals shelter, they were also believed to grant good deeds to whoever built them.

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AN ABANDONED BABY FOX WHO CAN’T USE HER BACK LEGS GETS A SPECIAL WHEELCHAIR

ASIA IN HER WHEELCHAIR

One little fox has been gaining a lot of attention on social media, for one very unique reason. While she may have a disability, the folks at the Kentucky Wildlife Center are determined not to let that stop her.

When you walk through the doors at the centre, you may be greeted by the friendly house cat waiting for an ear scratch, or the curious bunny ready for her close up.

“That’s what we do here. We take care of every animal to the max,” said PK Blankenship.

For some, it’s a place to rest and rehabilitate before being released back into the wild. For others, it becomes their home.

“She’s come a long way, she really has. It used to be that there wasn’t any movement in those back legs at all,” Blankenship said.

Asia the three-month-old Red Fox became a “permanent resident” back in May. She was found by a Boone County couple who immediately called the center’s director, Sam Opp, when they saw Asia try to walk.

“They noticed she wasn’t using her back legs,” Opp said.

It’s a disability Opp believes Asia has had since birth, and something that would have left her defenceless, and eventually dead, in the wild.

“You would never know she can’t use those back legs. She thinks she’s a regular fox. She pounces like a regular fox. She jumps like a regular fox. She crawls over you like a regular fox,” Blankenship said.

But what you may not see on a regular fox is the shiny wheelchair.

“Sometimes it’s funny. We put her in it and she’s like a NASCAR race driver. She takes off,” Blankenship said.

While Asia may have the need for speed, learning to use the chair isn’t always a smooth ride.

“I’m not saying she won’t bump into something, it does frighten her. It’s just like as a child. She would tumble off her mom and shake it off,” Blankenship said.

Still a wild animal, there are days Asia isn’t in the mood for physical therapy.

“If she’s just having a bad day, she’ll get more free time, which is after every session anyways,” Opp said.

With the help of Opp, her handler Blankenship, and the wheelchair, she will most likely be able to walk using her back legs one day.

“She has shown improvement in using those back legs to actually stand on her own. She is a very determined fox kit. She’s not giving up and we’re not giving up on her either. We’re in it for the long haul,” Blankenship said.

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A 10-POINT BUCK SOUGHT SANCTUARY INSIDE A SOUTHERN MICHIGAN CHURCH ON THE OPENING DAY OF THE STATE’S DEER HUNTING SEASON

THE BUCK INSIDE THE CHURCH

On the first day of deer season for firearms in Michigan, a 10-point buck apparently sought to find refuge in Grace Christian Fellowship Church in Sturgis, breaking through a window and becoming a huge surprise to the pastors when they got to the church Monday morning.

“When Luke Eicher, Justin Wickey and Amanda Eicher arrived at the church this morning, they found signs of breaking and entering,” stated the church’s description on the video. “Little did they know that a 10-point buck had come for prayer in the auditorium on opening day of gun season.”

When the three walked into the church’s office Monday morning, they noticed light coming from a darkened window in the auditorium.

“When I peeked inside, I saw the window was broken and heard loud banging,” Amanda Eisher told Storyful. “My husband rushed in and found this 10-point buck. On the opening day of the gun season of all days!”

“I was just shocked by how high he could jump,” Amanda Eicher said. “I was amazed at how big he was.”

The buck didn’t appear to have any gunshot wounds and was bleeding just a bit from what appeared to be cuts from the glass, she told the Kalamazoo Gazette. Besides the broken window, the only other damage was blood stains on the carpet.

“There was some damage to the building and our pastors are a little traumatized,” the church reported. “But the buck left strengthened in the Lord to go face his battles.”

Credit: The Grace Christian Fellowship Church

Bird Aid : URGENT Help Needed For Hailsham Gull Sanctuary

A bird charity has very little time to save itself, and the thousands of injured gulls it cares for.

Bird Aid‘s sanctuary in Hailsham, East Sussex, houses 250 attacked or injured birds at any one time, including 100 permanent residents.

It needs £170,000 to buy the land it’s on, after an investor pulled out.

Owner Julia Gould said: “We need help, time is nearly out. We’re the only gull rescue centre in the country, we’re vital, without us thousands will die.”

JULIA GOULD WITH SOME OF HER GULLS

“I know they have a reputation for stealing people’s food, but they’re not nasty birds and they have no talons, no hooked beak, no weapons,” Mrs Gould said.

“It’s a shame Brighton or Sussex doesn’t adopt them as our county bird and do more to appreciate and protect them.

“The seaside wouldn’t be the same without them.”

Bird Aid began in Eastbourne at the home of Julia and Ian Gould. Julia had worked with garden birds and gulls for many years and decided to set up a separate charity dedicated to gulls. They had aviaries in the garden and four learning disabled adults who came for work experience. The facilities were limited so they decided to look for a bigger property. A large factor in their decision was an urgent need to give their, much loved, blind gull a better life by building him a bespoke aviary.

One of the Trustees said he wanted to give some of his own money to the Gould’s so that a larger place could be purchased. He said he was fully supportive of Julia’s work with the gulls and wanted Bird Aid to help as many gulls as possible. After a long search they found Hydeaway, which was perfect for the birds and would provide plenty of work for Learning-Disabled volunteers too. Hydeaway is set on a two-acre site which now has superb facilities that cannot be bettered by any rescue centre. 

 After a change in circumstances we have had to come to an agreement that Bird Aid has one year to raise enough money to buy this person out. If the money cannot be raised, then this centre of excellence for gulls all over Southern England will close.

Herring gulls are on the RSBPs red list for threatened birds, as the species has seen a sharp decrease in population over last 25 years.

Mrs Gould has been operating the centre for eight years and said she has seen some horrific injuries to the seaside birds.

One came in with a broken leg, wing and ribs after being “beaten to near death” by a man in Eastbourne. t recovered but due to neurological damage can never be released back into the wild.

“People attack them, throw them into bins, it’s horrendous,” she said.

Gulls from across the country are taken to Bird Aid, and people from all over the world ring Mrs Gould for advice on caring for injured gulls.

“People call them a nuisance, but they adapt to us. They’re not wanted on the beach, we keep building hotels, houses, towns on the beachfront and they’re not wanted there either.

“They need to live somewhere. They have a right to be here, and be treated kindly.”

If you would like to help you can donate here: Help Hailsham Bird Sanctuary

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Appeals For Information After A Staffordshire Bull Terrier Was Found Tied To A Tree And Abandoned In A Flooded Area

THE STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER FOUND TIED TO A TREE BY A METAL LEAD.

The RSPCA is appealing for information after a Staffordshire Bull Terrier was found tied to a tree in a flooded area in Croydon.

The female dog, now named Lorraine by RSPCA staff, was found off Kestral Way in New Addington in the old Pitch and Putt site on an unused footpath which had become severely flooded. She had been tied to a tree by a metal lead and was scared and barking.

Torrential rain had formed a river around her on the footpath which was approximately 1.5ft deep.

RSPCA Inspector James Whipps attended and rescued the dog on Sunday 31 October.

He said: “This poor dog was terrified when I arrived. The area was completely flooded around her and she’d been tied to a tree and abandoned. I rescued her and took her to our RSPCA Leybourne Animal Centre in Kent where she is now getting some much needed TLC.

“We know that people’s circumstances may change which means they can no longer care for their pets but there is never an excuse to abandon an animal like this. This dog was scared and cold and in danger due to the flooding. Abandoning a dog like this is just cruel.

“I’d urge anyone who saw anything in the area or who recognises this dog to please contact us, in strictest confidence, on the inspectorate appeal line on 0300 123 8018.”

Editor’s Note: Regardless of the dog owner’s circumstances, there is NO excuse for abandoning Lorraine. Tying her to a tree with no chance of escaping from the floods is DISGUSTING!!!!

A Greek Coffee Shop Opens Its Doors Every Night To Stray Dogs

HOTT SPOTT: THE KINDNESS CAFE

Greece has a large stray dog population where stray dogs roam the city looking for a meal, a home, and some warmth. On the Greek island of Lesbos in the north Aegean Sea there is a small coffee shop along the waterfront in the town of Mytilene where all the stray dogs come to hang out. It goes by the kitschy name Hott Spott and offers a warm spot for the dogs to spend a bit of evening and catch up on some sleep for the night. It is kind of a hostel for strays.

Once all customers are gone, Hott Spott welcomes the city’s homeless dogs to come in and enjoy a safe, warm spot to sleep for the night. Most of them can be seen on the couches of the café, getting that sacred good night sleep that strays on the street are never able to find.

a safe pLace for HOMELESS dogs to sleep

While it may not be possible to open your home to every stray pet in need, an open heart can be just as accommodating.

“When the bar closes each night, the dogs come and sleep here,” says one of the café’s waiters.  “We don’t have a problem. From July, every night there is a dog on the couch.”

The Greek Isles are home to over 1 million stray dogs, says Greek charities, according to White Wolf Pack. So this one café, the Hott Spott, located on the island of Lesbos, is stepping up and doing its part in an act of sheer humanity. Many dogs in Greece without a permanent home receive a collar and are cared for by the community, instead of placing them in overcrowded shelters.

Such random acts of generosity toward animals isn’t uncommon in Greece, which has a large number of stray dogs. Despite being without a permanent home or family, these animals are often collared and cared for by the community — an alternative to putting them into crowded shelters.

“Here in Greece our homes are not large enough for all of us to house animals,” said an Athens resident. “The island of Lesbos has also been the epicenter of the refugee crisis,” said Eustratios Papanis, a 46-year-old assistant professor of sociology at the University of the Aegean on Lesbos island, who posted the pictures and story of the dogs sleeping peacefully on social media. “The locals have increased levels of solidarity towards environmental and humanistic issues. The new generation is more sensitive and well informed.”

It only took this one simple kind act to change the lives of the sweet dogs who come to the café at night, where they now matter to someone.

To learn more about Greece’s stray pet population, and to find out how you can help, visit Greek Animal Rescue and The Friends Of The Strays Of Greece.

The Coffee Shop That Opens Its Doors Every Night To Stray Dogs  VIDEO

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These Service Dogs Attended A Relaxed Performance Of ‘Billy Elliot’ To Learn How To Behave In A Theatre

We’ve all had the misfortune of suffering through some inconsiderate audience members while enjoying ourselves at a theatre. There’s that one person that has to spoil main plot twists or the ever-annoying social media addict that’s glued to their phones with screens blasting on a 100% brightness. But have you ever met a dog in the audience?

The Stratford Festival in Ontario, Canada hosted a very special kind of audience, a group of adorable service dogs. On August 15, the Stratford Festival shared a gallery of photos on their Twitter account with the caption, “We had some pawsitivly adorable audience members from K-9 Country Inn Service Dogs during last week’s Relaxed Performance of #sfBillyElliot.”

ALL EYES ON BILLY ELLIOT

The team of canines were from K-9 Country Inn Service Dogs, a Service dog training Program that specializes “in programs for first responders, front line workers, and victims of trauma with PTSD”. The working dogs probably enjoyed the music and pretty sights, but they were actually on a training plan. They were brought to the Relaxed Performance of “Billy Elliot the Musical” to learn proper theatre behaviour which involved a lot of sitting, quietly.

Laura MacKenzie, the woman behind K-9 Country Inn Working Service Dogs, revealed she’s been dog training for over 35 years. “I made the move to training service and guide dogs years ago because I wanted to give back to society and found a great need within the service dog industry,” she revealed. MacKenzie previously trained police dogs, personal protection dogs, herding dogs, etc. “It’s important to prepare the dogs for any activity the handler may like to attend,” she said.

Who are the Service Dogs Watching Billy Elliot?

This adorable canine pack are from the dog training provider, K-9 Country Inn Working Service Dogs. K-9 Country Inn aims to support first responders, veterans, and civilians suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

THE K-9 Country Inn Service Dogs

The performance that the pups were observing was also special and as the theatre calls it, relaxed. Their site describes the relaxed performances like this:

“Relaxed performances are specifically designed to welcome patrons who will benefit from a less restricted audience environment. Patrons of all abilities are welcome, including but not limited to those with intellectual or learning disabilities, sensory processing conditions or autism. There is a relaxed attitude to noise and movement within the auditorium, and some minor production changes may be made to reduce the intensity of light, sound and other potentially startling effects. Babes in arms are also welcome to our relaxed performances.”

It’s not the first time that dogs have been seen having a good time in weird and wonderful places.

WHAT A SERIOUS FACE

A cinema in Planto, Texas, became the first in the world to allow dog-lovers to attend the movies along with their pets.

With this in mind, having the service dogs there is actually a huge help to the performers. In Billy Elliott, there are tons of child actors. This specific situation helps the child actor get used to seeing animals in the audience. It’s a win-win!

A Stratford Festival spokesperson told CBC that the festival hosts guests with service dogs several times a week.

“It’s wonderful that going to the theatre is considered one of the things that you want to train a service dog for, rather than thinking that theatre is out of reach for people who require a service animal, because it isn’t,” the spokesperson said.

A VERY WELL-BEHAVED AUDIENCE

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IS TODAY A BONES OR NO BONES DAY? HERE’S HOW NOODLE THE PUG PREDICTS YOUR DAY FOR YOU

#Bones or #NoBones? The internet’s mood is now determined by Noodle the rescue Pug.

NOODLES ~ THE BONES OR NO BONES PUP

The 13-year-old pup has captivated TikTok with “no bones,” a game his owner Jonathan Graziano plays and posts video of nearly every day.

Horoscopes and tarot cards can all take a backseat to Noodle the pug. To be clear, this isn’t a story about a boneless dog. Noodle has bones. But millions of people across the internet are using Mr. Graziano’s TikTok videos as a daily horoscope of sorts to see what kind of day they will have. Think of Noodle as a four-legged clairvoyant.

Mr Graziano first posted about Noodle in September 2020; since then, the account has gained over 2 million followers. New Noodle videos are posted somewhat sporadically, which only adds to the thrill. Waking up to see a new video of Noodle is, in fact, the highlight of viewer’s days.

Mr. Graziano has had Noodle since January 2016, when he got him from a woman who had been fostering him after Noodle was surrendered by his previous owner. With Noodle’s companionship, Mr. Graziano has been able to ride out the pandemic.

“Having a dog is the best thing that I’ve done for me,” he said. “No matter what is going on in my life or what’s going on in the world, this dog has no clue. He still has to eat every morning. He’s got to go on his walks.”

The senior pup has captivated TikTok with “no bones,” a game his owner Jonathan Graziano plays and records nearly every morning to see if Noodle will stand up or simply flop back over onto his doggie bed.

Noodle is now a fluffy oracle for Gen Z and millennials alike: Across social media, people are now using the bones day classifications to determine whether the day will be a lazy or productive one. Like waiting on a groundhog to see his shadow, people await Noodle’s bones status to determine how their day will be.

If the loveable pooch flops over when he wakes up in the morning then it is ‘No Bones Day’ which means that you can relax and put off all of those tasks that you really didn’t want to do. But, if Noodle ‘has bones’ and stands up at the start of the day then it is a ‘Bones Day’ meaning that you have to get up, get ready and crack on with all of those things that you have been meaning to do.

“Good morning, everyone, and welcome back to yet another round of ‘no bones,’ the game where we find out if my 13-year-old pug woke up with bones, and we also kind of find out how our day is going to go,” Graziano says at the start of most of his “no bones” videos.

“Oh, my gosh! Oh my, gosh! We have bones!” Graziano declared in a recent video, in which Noodle stands up.

Graziano’s “no bones” videos have racked up millions of views, and his account has grown to 1.7 million followers. The hashtag “BonesDay” has been viewed more than 33.8 million times as of Monday, and “#BonesOrNoBones” has been viewed more than 2.1 million times.

We’ve just been doing this for years,” he said. “I adopted Noodle when he was seven and a half years old, and we learned very early on that when he doesn’t want to go on walkies, he will not go on walkies. And it’s just insane to be able to share this with you guys and see the response. So I really appreciate it.”

Catch with Noodle’s predictions here: Bones Or No Bones

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A HIKER SAVED THE LIFE OF AN ALASKAN TIMBER WOLF—4 YEARS LATER THE WOLF STILL REMEMBERED HIM

Deep in the Alaskan wilderness, a prospector came to the rescue of an injured mother wolf and her pups, and a lasting connection is formed.

One spring morning many years ago, I had been prospecting for gold along Coho Creek on south-eastern Alaska’s Kupreanof Island, and as I emerged from a forest of spruce and hemlock, I froze in my tracks. No more than 20 paces away in the bog was a huge Alaskan timber wolf—caught in one of Trapper George’s traps.

Old George had died the previous week of a heart attack, so the wolf was lucky I had happened along. Confused and frightened at my approach, the wolf backed away, straining at the trap chain. Then I noticed some­thing else: It was a female, and her teats were full of milk. Somewhere there was a den of hungry pups waiting for their mother.

From her appearance, I guessed that she had been trapped only a few days. That meant her pups were probably still alive, surely no more than a few miles away. But I suspected that if I tried to release the wolf, she would turn aggressive and try to tear me to pieces. Here are the proven skills to survive any emergency.

So I decided to search for her pups instead and began to look for incoming tracks that might lead me to her den. Fortunately, there were still a few remaining patches of snow. After several moments, I spotted paw marks on a trail skirting the bog.

The tracks led a half ­mile through the forest, then up a rock­-strewn slope. I finally spotted the den at the base of an enormous spruce. There wasn’t a sound in­side. Wolf pups are shy and cautious, and I didn’t have much hope of luring them outside. But I had to try. So I began imitating the high­-pitched squeak of a mother wolf calling her young. No response. A few moments later, after I tried another call, four tiny pups appeared.

They couldn’t have been more than a few weeks old. I extended my hands, and they tentatively suckled at my fingers. Perhaps hunger had helped overcome their natural fear. Then, one by one, I placed them in a burlap bag and headed back down the slope.

When the mother wolf spotted me, she stood erect. Possibly picking up the scent of her young, she let out a high­-pitched, plaintive whine. I released the pups, and they raced to her. Within seconds, they were slurping at her belly.

What next? I wondered. The mother wolf was clearly suffering. Yet each time I moved in her direction, a menacing growl rumbled in her throat. With her young to protect, she was becoming belligerent. She needs nourishment, I thought. I have to find her something to eat.

I hiked toward Coho Creek and spotted the leg of a dead deer sticking out of a snowbank. I cut off a hindquarter, then re­turned the remains to nature’s ice­box. Toting the venison haunch back to the wolf, I whispered in a soothing tone, “OK, Mother, your dinner is served. But only if you stop growling at me. C’mon, now. Easy.” I tossed chunks of venison in her direction. She sniffed them, then gobbled them up.

Cutting hemlock boughs, I fashioned a rough shelter for myself and was soon asleep nearby. At dawn, I was awakened by four fluffy bundles of fur sniffing at my face and hands. I glanced toward the agitated moth­er wolf. If I could only win her confidence, I thought. It was her only hope.

Over the next few days, I divided my time between prospecting and trying to win the wolf’s trust. I talked gently with her, threw her more venison, and played with the pups. Little by little, I kept edging closer—though I was careful to re­main beyond the length of her chain. The big animal never took her dark eyes off me. “Come on, Mother,” I pleaded. “You want to go back to your friends on the mountain. Relax.”

At dusk on the fifth day, I delivered her daily fare of venison. “Here’s dinner,” I said softly as I approached. “C’mon, girl. Nothing to be afraid of.” Suddenly, the pups came bounding to me. At least I had their trust. But I was beginning to lose hope of ever winning over the mother. Then I thought I saw a slight wagging of her tail. I moved within the length of her chain. She remained motionless. My heart in my mouth, I sat down eight feet from her. One snap of her huge jaws and she could break my arm … or my neck. I wrapped my blanket around myself and slowly settled onto the cold ground. It was a long time before I fell asleep.

I awoke at dawn, stirred by the sound of the pups nursing. Gently, I leaned over and petted them. The mother wolf stiffened. “Good morning, friends,” I said tentatively. Then I slowly placed my hand on the wolf’s injured leg. She flinched but made no threatening move. This can’t be happening, I thought. Yet it was.

I could see that the trap’s steel jaws had imprisoned only two toes. They were swollen and lacerated, but she wouldn’t lose the paw—if I could free her.

“OK,” I said. “Just a little longer and we’ll have you out of there.” I applied pressure, the trap sprang open, and the wolf pulled free.

Whimpering, she loped about, favouring the injured paw. My experience in the wild suggested that the wolf would now gather her pups and vanish into the woods. But cautiously, she crept toward me. The pups nipped playfully at their mother as she stopped at my elbow. Slowly, she sniffed my hands and arms. Then the wolf began licking my fingers. I was astonished. This went against everything I’d ever heard about timber wolves. Yet, strangely, it all seemed so natural.

After a while, with her pups scurrying around her, the mother wolf was ready to leave and began to limp off toward the forest. Then she turned back to me.

“You want me to come with you, girl?” I asked. Curious, I packed my gear and set off.

Following Coho Creek for a few miles, we ascended Mount Kupreanof ­ until we reached an al­pine meadow. There, lurking in the forested perimeter, was a wolf pack—I counted nine adults and, judging by their playful antics, four nearly full­-grown pups. After a few minutes of greeting, the pack broke into howling. It was an eerie sound, ranging from low wails to high-pitched yodelling.

At dark, I set up camp. By the light of my fire and a glistening moon, I could see furtive wolf shapes dodging in and out of the shadows, eyes shining. I had no fear. They were merely curious. So was I.

I awoke at first light. It was time to leave the wolf to her pack. She watched as I assembled my gear and started walking across the meadow.

Reaching the far side, I looked back. The mother and her pups were sitting where I had left them, watching me. I don’t know why, but I waved. At the same time, the mother wolf sent a long, mournful howl into the crisp air.

Four years later, after serving in World War II, I returned to Coho Creek. It was the fall of 1945. After the horrors of the war, it was good to be back among the soaring spruce and breathing the familiar, bracing air of the Alaskan bush. Then I saw, hanging in the red cedar where I had placed it four years before, the now­-rusted steel trap that had ensnared the mother wolf. The sight of it gave me a strange feeling, and something made me climb Kupreanof Mountain to the meadow where I had last seen her. There, standing on a lofty ledge, I gave out a long, low wolf call—­something I had done many times before.

An echo came back across the distance. Again, I called. And again the echo reverberated, this time followed by a wolf call from a ridge about a half­ mile away.

I had no fear. The wolves were merely curious. So was I.

Then, far off, I saw a dark shape moving slowly in my direction. As it crossed the meadow, I could see it was a timber wolf. A chill spread through my whole body. I knew at once that familiar shape, even after four years. “Hello, old girl,” I called gently. The wolf edged closer, ears erect, body tense, and stopped a few yards off, her bushy tail wagging slightly.

Moments later, the wolf was gone. I left Kupreanof Island a short time after that, and I never saw the animal again. But the memory she left with me—vivid, haunting, a little eerie—will always be there, a reminder that there are things in nature that exist outside the laws and understanding of man.

With four tiny pups to feed, the mother wolf would need to stay nourished.

During that brief instant in time, this injured animal and I had some­how penetrated each other’s worlds, bridging barriers that were never meant to be bridged. There is no explaining experiences like this. We can only accept them and—because they’re tinged with an air of mystery and strangeness—per­haps treasure them all the more.

This story originally appeared in the May 1987 issue of Reader’s Digest.

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A Critically Endangered Sumatran Tiger Has Been Found Dead In An Animal Trap In Indonesia

MEMBERS OF NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION AGENCY INSPECT A SUMATRAN TIGER FOUND DEAD AFTER BEING CAUGHT IN A SNARE TRAP IN PEKANBARU, RIAU

A critically endangered Sumatran Tiger was found dead after being caught in a trap on Indonesia’s Sumatra island, authorities said on Monday, in the latest setback for a species whose numbers are estimated to have dwindled to about 400.

A STUNNING SUMATRAN TIGER

The female Tiger, aged between 4 and 5 years, was found dead Sunday near Bukit Batu Wildlife Reserve in the Bengkalis district of Riau province, said Fifin Arfiana Jogasara, the head of Riau’s conservation agency.

Jogasara said an examination determined the Tiger died from dehydration five days after being caught in the snare trap, apparently set by a poacher, which broke one of its legs.

She said her agency will cooperate with law enforcement agencies in an investigation.

Sumatran Tigers, the most critically endangered Tiger subspecies, are under increasing pressure due to poaching as their jungle habitat shrinks, according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It estimated fewer than 400 Sumatran Tigers remain in the wild.

It was the latest killing of endangered animals on Sumatra island. Conservationists say the coronavirus pandemic has led to increased poaching as villagers turn to hunting for economic reasons.

Three Sumatran Tigers, including two cubs, were found dead in late August after being caught in traps in the Leuser Ecosystem Area, a region for tiger conservation in Aceh province.

In early July, a female Tiger was found dead with injuries caused by a snare trap in South Aceh district.

An Elephant was found without its head on July 11 in a palm plantation in East Aceh. Police arrested a suspected poacher along with four people accused of buying ivory from the dead animal.

AN ELEPHANT FOUND WITHOUT ITS HEAD AFTER BEING KILLED BY POACHERS

Aceh police also arrested four men in June for allegedly catching a Tiger with a snare trap and selling its remains for 100 million rupiah ($6,900). Days later, another Sumatran Tiger died after it ate a goat laced with rat poison in neighbouring North Sumatra province.

Via A P News

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